Current Chronic Kidney Disease News and Events

Current Chronic Kidney Disease News and Events, Chronic Kidney Disease News Articles.
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New blood pressure-lowering guidelines could benefit 25 million americans with chronic kidney disease
A recommendation for more intensive blood pressure management from an influential global nonprofit that publishes clinical practice guidelines in kidney disease could, if followed, benefit nearly 25 million Americans. (2021-02-23)

New strategy blocks chronic lung disease in mice
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has uncovered a previously unknown role for exosomes in inflammatory respiratory diseases. The study has implications for finding new therapies. Exosomes are tiny compartments released from cells that carry different types of cargo, including inflammatory chemicals called cytokines that can drive lung disease. (2021-02-23)

New model helping identify pregnant women whose previous kidney injury puts them, babies at risk
Young pregnant women, who appear to have fully recovered from an acute injury that reduced their kidney function, have higher rates of significant problems like preeclampsia and low birthweight babies, problems which indicate their kidneys have not actually fully recovered. MCG scientists have developed a rodent model that is enabling studies to better understand, identify and ideally avoid this recently identified association. (2021-02-22)

LSU Health study finds psychosocial factors may drive peritoneal dialysis patient dropout
A retrospective study conducted by LSU Health New Orleans reports that contrary to previous research, most patients who drop out of peritoneal dialysis may do so for psychosocial reasons. The findings are published in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The paper inspired a companion editorial. (2021-02-19)

Real world data on hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure
In an analysis of information on 448 patients with heart failure who were discharged from a hospital in Sweden, 20.3% of patients were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, and 60.9% were readmitted within 1 year. The ESC Heart Failure analysis found that most of the patients who needed to be rehospitalized were readmitted for heart failure. (2021-02-18)

Physical conditions linked to psychological distress in patients with cancer
Among patients with cancer, having additional physical comorbidities was linked with a higher risk of experiencing psychological distress. The finding comes from a Psycho-Oncology analysis of 2017 data from the National Health Survey of Spain. (2021-02-18)

Mimicking a chronic immune response changes the brain
Abnormal production of Inflammatory cytokines by the immune system is responsible for a host of autoimmune disorders. One important cytokine is IL-17A, which is also involved in neurological diseases. Researchers at Tsukuba University in Japan made a mouse model of chronically high IL-17A and to study its effect on the brain. They show that it leads to reduced activity and density of microglia in the brain's hippocampus, but no obvious memory deficits. (2021-02-17)

COVID-19 associated with leukoencephalopathy on brain MRI
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), COVID-19-related disseminated leukoencephalopathy (CRDL) represents an important--albeit uncommon--differential consideration in patients with neurologic manifestations of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). (2021-02-17)

Youth exposed to natural disasters report low post-traumatic stress
A study of over 1,700 U.S. young people exposed to four major hurricanes found that just a few of them reported chronic stress, and the trajectories among most youth reflected recovery or low-decreasing post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms, according to recently published research. The inquiry combined data from four studies of youths ages six to 16 who attended schools near the respective destructive paths of Hurricanes Andrew (1992), Charley (2004), Ike (2005) and Katrina (2008). (2021-02-17)

MSK physician shares kidney cancer research at annual ASCO GU Symposium
Memorial Sloan Kettering's Robert Motzer presented positive data from a phase III randomized study that assessed two different treatment combinations as first-line therapies that may benefit people with advanced kidney cancer. (2021-02-16)

IU researchers find disease-related gene changes in kidney tissue
Researchers from Indiana University have identified key genetic changes in the interstitial kidney tissue of people with diabetes, a discovery that signifies the potential for a revolutionary new genetic approach to the treatment of kidney disease. They will contribute their findings to the Kidney Precision Medicine Project's (KPMP) ''cell atlas,'' a set of maps used to classify and locate different cell types and structures within the kidney. (2021-02-16)

Researchers develop algorithm to find possible misdiagnosis
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed an algorithm that can identify patients who may have been wrongly diagnosed. With the help of digital disease history, the algorithm is able to register disease trajectories that differ so much from normal trajectories that there may be a misdiagnosis. The algorithm has been developed on the basis of data from several hundreds of thousands of COPD patients. (2021-02-15)

New hope for treating chronic pain without opioids
According to some estimates, chronic pain affects up to 40% of Americans, and treating it frustrates both clinicians and patients--a frustration that's often compounded by a hesitation to prescribe opioids for pain. (2021-02-15)

Cabozantinib most effective treatment for metastatic papillary kidney cancer
In a SWOG Cancer Research Network trial that put three targeted drugs to the test, the small molecule inhibitor cabozantinib was found most effective in treating patients with metastatic papillary kidney cancer - findings expected to change medical practice. (2021-02-13)

Immunotherapy -- targeted drug combination improves survival in advanced kidney cancer
Patients with advanced kidney cancer, who received a targeted drug combined with a checkpoint-blocker immunotherapy agent had longer survival than patients treated with the standard targeted drug, said an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial. (2021-02-13)

Researchers propose that humidity from masks may lessen severity of COVID-19
Masks help protect the people wearing them from getting or spreading SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, but now researchers from the National Institutes of Health have added evidence for yet another potential benefit for wearers: The humidity created inside the mask may help combat respiratory diseases such as COVID-19. (2021-02-12)

Endovascular aneurysm repair linked to higher readmission rates
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) are responsible for nearly 2% of all deaths in U.S. men over the age of 65. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has emerged as a newer and less invasive alternative to open repair for rAAA. But researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that while EVAR is more commonly utilized for rAA, the odds of hospital readmission after EVAR are 1.5 times higher compared to traditional open repair. (2021-02-10)

Lessons from the flu season
Australian researchers have come up with two key recommendations from studies of the annual influenza season - one highlighting the benefits of antivirals in reducing repeat hospitalisation, and the other to watch for underlying cardiovascular disease. While the world focuses on the rising COVID-19 death toll, seasonal influenza continues to cause significant mortality and poses a significant economic burden every year. (2021-02-10)

Study describes the diversity of genetic changes that cause inherited kidney disease
A study has described genetic changes in patients with the most common form of hereditary kidney disease that affects an estimated 12.5 million people worldwide. The research, which focussed on Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in Ireland, provides insights into PKD that will assist doctors and patients in the management of this of inherited condition. (2021-02-08)

Electronic health records can be valuable predictor of those likeliest to die from COVID
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital identifies key predictors of COVID-19 mortality among different age groups from patient longitudinal medical records. Predictive analytics based on electronic health records could prove valuable in allocating and distributing limited resources in the time of a pandemic. (2021-02-04)

Solving chronic pain during intercourse
Women suffering from chronic conditions that result in painful intercourse represent about 10% of females of reproductive age - triggering a combined economic burden of more than $7.7 billion per year - yet scant knowledge about the origins of this pain is preventing an effective way to treat it. (2021-02-04)

SARS-CoV-2 under the helium ion microscope for the first time
Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics have succeeded for the first time in imaging the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with a helium ion microscope. In contrast to the more conventional electron microscopy, the samples do not need a thin metal coating in helium ion microscopy. This allows interactions between the coronaviruses and their host cell to be observed particularly clearly. The findings have been published in the Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology. (2021-02-04)

Uncovering a link between inflammation and heart disease
Patients with cardiac disease often have chronic inflammation that damages their hearts, even with no infection present. A new study published in Circulation reveals a mechanism that is activating T cells, a type of immune cell, and causing inflammation in the heart. (2021-02-04)

More than half of cancer survivors have underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID
New study finds more than half (56.4%) of cancer survivors in the United States reported having additional underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID-19 illness. (2021-02-03)

On the dot: Novel quantum sensor provides new approach to early diagnosis via imaging
A phenomenon called 'oxidative stress' is seen in affected organs during the early stages of certain difficult-to-treat diseases like cancer and kidney dysfunction. Detecting oxidative stress could thus enable early diagnosis and preventive treatments. But, the in vivo measurement of oxidative stress caused by both oxidation and reduction has historically been difficult. Now, scientists have developed an advanced quantum sensor technology that can detect 'oxidative stress' non-invasively throughout the body using fluorescent imaging and MRI. (2021-02-03)

Study examines role of biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury in cancer patients
A study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in Kidney International Reports finds that immune checkpoint inhibitors, may have negative consequences in some patients, including acute kidney inflammation, known as interstitial nephritis. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are used to treat cancer by stimulating the immune system to attack cancerous cells. (2021-02-03)

Solving a puzzle
University of New Mexico scientists tease out the underlying mechanism of tuberous sclerosis complex (2021-02-03)

Biomedical basis of the Barker hypothesis uncovered
A research group at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern has published an extensive study on prenatal causes of kidney disease in adults in Nature Communications. The findings reveal that the serum protein fetuin-A plays a key role in attenuating local inflammation and microcalcifications in the fetal kidney, which have consequences for kidney function later in adulthood. The study results provide indications for clinical use of fetuin-A in kidney diseases. (2021-02-02)

When hyperactive proteins trigger illnesses
Autoimmune diseases, in which the body's own immune system attacks healthy tissue, can be life-threatening and can impact all organs. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now found a possible cause for these self-destructive immune system attacks: a hyperactive RANK protein on the surface of B cells. The research opens the door to new therapeutic possibilities. (2021-02-02)

Opioid prescriptions remained elevated two years after critical care
Nearly 11 percent of people admitted to an ICU in Sweden between 2010 and 2018 received opioid prescriptions on a regular basis for at least six months and up to two years after discharge. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet published in Critical Care Medicine. The findings suggest some may become chronic opioid users despite a lack of evidence of the drugs' long-term effectiveness and risks linked to increased mortality. (2021-02-02)

International research network identifies triggers for severe course of liver cirrhosis
Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a common cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. In ACLF the progressive loss of function of the scarred liver can no longer be compensated (acute decompensation). As a result, other organs such as the kidney or brain fail. The triggers for acute decompensation of liver cirrhosis and an ACLF are most frequently bacterial infections, liver inflammation caused by alcohol, or a combination of both factors. (2021-02-02)

Stress on every cell:
Uncovering the activities of the organs, tissues and cells responsible for the body's stress response as they've never before been seen revealed new cells and possible new drug targets (2021-02-01)

New protein neutralizes COVID in tiny human kidney
Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a new protein that acts as a trickster to neutralize the COVID-19 infection in a human kidney organoid, a miniature organ made from stem cells in the lab. (2021-02-01)

Nasal spray that protects against COVID-19 is also effective against the common cold
Research into a new drug, known as INNA-X, which primes the immune system in the respiratory tract and is in development for COVID-19 shows it is also effective against rhinovirus. Rhinovirus is the most common respiratory virus, the main cause of the common cold and is responsible for exacerbations of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (2021-02-01)

Social & structural factors influence racial disparities in COVID-19 mortality
COVID-19 mortality racial disparities in the US are associated with social factors like income, education and internet access, rather than biology, according to a Rutgers study. (2021-01-31)

New weapon for inflammation
Flinders University researchers have discovered a new anti-inflammatory role for well-known blood clot protein fibrinogen, which could support targeted new treatments for kidney, heart and other common diseases. The study in Redox Biology describes how fibrinogen can be protective against hypochlorite - a chemical generated by the body during inflammation - and so act as a kind of antioxidant in blood plasma. (2021-01-31)

Researchers illustrate the need for anti-racism in kidney care, research
There is a growing awareness of systematic inequality and structural racism in American society. Science and medicine are no exception, as evidenced by historical instances of discrimination and overt racism. In a perspective piece in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), take an honest look at how the current practice of nephrology (kidney medicine) may have elements rooted in racist ideologies. (2021-01-29)

Women who develop high blood pressure after birth at greater risk of chronic hypertension
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh will unveil findings that suggest that women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy and who continue to have elevated blood pressure postpartum are at an increased risk for developing chronic hypertension. (2021-01-29)

Link between dual sensory loss and depression
People with combined vision and hearing loss are nearly four times more likely to experience depression and more than three times more likely to suffer chronic anxiety, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology and led by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU). (2021-01-28)

Study introduces mRNA-LNP as a safe therapeutic intervention for liver regeneration
When severely or chronically injured, the liver loses its ability to regenerate. A new study led by researchers at the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) now describes a safe new potential therapeutic tool for the recovery of liver function in chronic and acute liver diseases. (2021-01-27)

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