Current Chronic Kidney Disease News and Events | Page 25

Current Chronic Kidney Disease News and Events, Chronic Kidney Disease News Articles.
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Interaction between immune factors triggers cancer-promoting chronic inflammation
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified interaction between two elements of the immune system as critical for the transformation of a protective immune response into chronic, cancer-promoting inflammation. (2019-02-11)

Is chronic rhinosinusitis associated with increased risk of depression, anxiety?
Chronic rhinosinusitis is a common condition marked by sinus inflammation that can make breathing difficult and cause face pain or tenderness. The condition affects quality of life but whether it contributes to depression and anxiety in patients is unclear. This study of about 49,000 people in a South Korean insurance database examined the risk of depression and anxiety in chronic rhinosinusitis and depending on the type of chronic rhinosinusitis (with or without nasal polyps). (2019-02-07)

Erenumab in migraine: Indication of considerable added benefit for certain patients
The first drug of a new drug class can reduce the number of headache days if other prophylactic medications have failed or have not been an option. (2019-02-07)

Feinstein CEO, global researchers show significance of neurotransmitter in viral infection
Feinstein Institute for Medical Research President and CEO Kevin J. Tracey, MD has joined with leading scientists across Canada, Europe and Asia, to discover the critical role the chemical acetylcholine plays as a neurotransmitter in combating chronic viral infection, as published online today in Science. A neurosurgeon specialist in the molecular mechanisms of inflammation, Dr. Tracey has studied the immune system for decades and led the development of the emerging field of bioelectronic medicine. (2019-02-07)

Financial relationships and prescribing practices between physicians and drug companies
In a study published in The Oncologist, physicians treating certain cancers who consistently received payments from a cancer drug's manufacturer were more likely to prescribe that drug over alternative treatments. (2019-02-06)

Scientists seeking to regrow kidneys make promising discovery
Scientists seeking to regrow damaged kidneys have discovered that blocked kidneys in newborns have a remarkable ability to repair themselves after the obstruction is removed. The finding offers insights into how that happens and could eventually help doctors regenerate kidneys in adults. (2019-02-06)

NSAID impairs immune response in heart failure, worsens heart and kidney damage
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are widely known as pain-killers and can relieve pain and inflammation. In a study published in the journal Life Sciences, researchers found that treatment with the NSAID carprofen alone triggered subtle low-grade inflammation in the heart and kidneys. The combination of carprofen pretreatment and heart attack magnified this impact by dysregulating the acute inflammatory response, amplifying inflammation and intensifying the cardiorenal syndrome. (2019-02-06)

Connective tissue on the wrong road -- when organs start to scar
The increased deposition of connective tissue is a problem in chronic diseases of many organs. Up to 40 percent of all deaths in industrial nations are caused by the deposition of connective tissue with subsequent tissue scarring. In spite of this, there are very few effective treatments available. Scientists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now decrypted a molecular network that controls these processes and could in future provide a new way to treat organ scarring. (2019-02-05)

Researchers one step closer to growing made-to-order human kidneys
A team led by researchers from the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan successfully use stem cells to grow mouse kidneys inside rats. (2019-02-05)

Mayo Clinic researchers develop prediction tool for kidney stones
Kidney stones are a common and painful condition, with many sufferers experiencing recurrent episodes. Most people who pass an initial stone want to know their chances of future episodes, but this has not always been easy to predict. Now Mayo Clinic researchers are tracking the familiar characteristics of kidney stone formers in an online prediction tool that could help sufferers anticipate if they'll experience future episodes. The study was published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2019-02-04)

What drives patients to use medical marijuana: mostly chronic pain
A new University of Michigan study seeks to understand whether people are using medical cannabis for evidence-based reasons. (2019-02-04)

Researchers are worried that people with chronic disease are not being active enough
A study of over 96,000 UK men and women, of average age 64.5 years, has found that those with chronic conditions are spending considerably less time on physical activity than their healthy peers, so are missing out on its health management benefits. (2019-02-04)

When mucus can be key to treating colon and airway diseases
New research reveals how healthy cells in our bodies produce mucins -- the main component of mucous, which protects our intestine and airway from pathogens, toxins and allergens. Scientists have already linked defects in mucins secretion to airway and colonic diseases, such as asthma or ulcerative colitis. Now, researchers at Malhotra's laboratory in Barcelona, reveal how cells control quantities of mucin released and could become a new avenue to treat several mucin-related diseases. (2019-02-01)

ATS publishes new clinical guideline on home oxygen for children
The American Thoracic Society has developed a new clinical practice guideline for home oxygen therapy for children. The guideline appears in the Feb. 1 edition of the Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-02-01)

Chronic kidney disease: Everyone's concern
850 million people worldwide are affected by kidney disease. This worrying figure was published last June. The leading preventable causes of CKD, which carries significant health burden, are diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. Prevention of CKD is a global concern and the fight against preventable causes must be intensified. ERA-EDTA has published a leaflet with practical tips to help reduce the risk of developing conditions which can lead to CKD. (2019-01-31)

Treatment for obesity and fatty liver disease may be in reach
Professor Amiram Goldblum and his team at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute for Drug Research have discovered 27 new molecules. These molecules all activate a special protein called PPAR-delta and have the potential to treat fatty liver disease, obesity, diabetic nephrotoxicity, and to heal wounds. (2019-01-31)

Minority kidney transplants could increase with new option
Kidney transplant recipients are now benefiting from donor organs that do not match their blood type but are compatible and just as safe, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. (2019-01-31)

Can the eye help achieve islet transplant tolerance in type 1 diabetes?
Diabetes Research Institute scientists show in experimental and preclinical recipients that islets transplanted in the eye can survive and function long-term without continuous immunosuppression, and, moreover, that initial islet transplants within the eye may lead to long-term peripheral immune tolerance to islets in other transplant sites. (2019-01-31)

Kidney transplantation to minority patients with a different blood types is safe
Minority patients achieve the same outcomes if they receive donor kidneys that are fully immunologically compatible compared with patients who receive the organs from fully compatible donors, according to study findings from Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn. (2019-01-30)

Extremely high blood pressure in African-Americans is 5 times the national average
Extremely high blood pressure that leads to strokes, heart attacks and acute kidney damage, classified as hypertensive emergency, is five times higher in inner-city African-American patients than the national average, according to a recent study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. (2019-01-30)

Measuring how arthritis patients respond to a common treatment
A new assay accurately measures how arthritis patients respond to treatment with the arthritis drug adalimumab, a finding that highlights potential strategies for predicting the drug's effectiveness in patients. (2019-01-30)

Cells that destroy the intestine
In spite of tremendous advances in treating the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases Morbus Crohn and ulcerative colitis with medication, the chronic inflammation still cannot be kept sufficiently in check for a number of patients. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now proven that certain cells in the intestines have a key role to play in inducing acute inflammatory episodes. It is hoped that this discovery will lead to innovative approaches to treating the diseases in future. (2019-01-29)

Study examines barriers to exercise experienced by dialysis patients
Patients undergoing dialysis experience various barriers to exercise -- predominately fatigue, shortness of breath, and weakness. Patients were primarily interested in exercise as a mechanism to improve quality of life as opposed to reduce heart disease and hospitalization. (2019-01-29)

UBC research examines living well while dying
A UBC professor has determined that people diagnosed with terminal cancer -- who have hope, positivity and family support -- are able to live well during the advanced stage of the disease. Carole Robinson, professor emeritus with UBC Okanagan School of Nursing, recently published a paper explaining the process of living well with an awareness of dying. (2019-01-29)

Diabetes tops common conditions for frequent geriatric emergency patients
Older adults go to the emergency department more often than other age groups, stay longer, and typically require more resources and medical interventions. The most common conditions among geriatric frequent users include diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, congestive heart failure and blockage or damage to veins or arteries, according to new research in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2019-01-28)

New therapeutic targets for kidney fibrosis emerge
A new study, published in Science Translational Medicine, identifies key factors involved in this cell cycle arrest and illuminating their consequences. Based on these discoveries, the research team, led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital, also identifies a novel intracellular structure and new therapeutic targets for kidney fibrosis. (2019-01-28)

ESC press release: Loss of muscle and weight associated with disability after stroke
Loss of muscle and body weight is associated with disability after stroke, reports a study presented today at Heart & Stroke 2019, a meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Stroke, and published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. (2019-01-25)

Scientists successfully obtain synthetic growth factor compatible to the native protein
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at Kanazawa University show that an artificially synthesized molecule can exhibit compatible activities to natural molecules in its biological effectiveness. (2019-01-25)

New therapeutic target for graft-vs-host disease could make bone marrow transplant safer
Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of bone marrow transplant, a potentially curative treatment for patients with blood-borne cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma. Inhibiting Sirt-1 in a mouse model helped control GVHD without making tumor relapse more likely, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in Blood. The inhibitor has already been proven safe in humans but would need further testing in patients with blood-borne cancers. (2019-01-25)

Zinc deficiency may play a role in high blood pressure
Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Renal Physiology. (2019-01-24)

New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs
Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a 'master regulator' of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals. (2019-01-24)

Why liver transplant waitlists might misclassify high-risk patients
A new study in the journal Gastroenterology reveals that the standard method for ranking patients on the waitlist for lifesaving liver transplantation may not prioritize some of the sickest candidates for the top of the list. (2019-01-24)

Kidney-resident macrophages -- a role for healing during acute kidney injury?
Researchers have found that, during acute kidney injury in a mouse model, the kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state, resembling these same cells when they are found in newborn mice. Newborn mouse kidneys are still developing. This reprogramming during may be important to promote healing and tissue regeneration. (2019-01-24)

Study finds unique form of chronic sinusitis in older patients
Older patients with a diagnosis of chronic sinusitis -- a disease of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses that often persists over many years -- have a unique inflammatory signature that may render them less responsive to steroid treatment, according to a new study published by Vanderbilt researchers. (2019-01-23)

Cancer has a biological clock and this drug may keep it from ticking
Scientists at USC Michelson Center and Japan's Nagoya University find and test a promising drug that stops cancer by interfering with the cancer cells' metabolism and other circadian-related functions. (2019-01-23)

Investigators close in on best treatment guidelines for critical limb ischemia
A new report in the Journal of Vascular Surgery chronicles a multi-site randomized controlled trial that seeks to compare treatment efficacy, functional outcomes, cost effectiveness, and quality of life for 2,100 patients suffering from the condition. (2019-01-22)

Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats
Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts. A 2008 paper in Nature described the emergence of no fewer than 335 infectious diseases in the global human population between 1940 and 2004. In the veterinary field, just as in the medical field, advanced molecular techniques and sophisticated computer-based algorithms for genetic sequence assembly and analysis have revolutionized infectious disease research. (2019-01-22)

Fewer medical tests -- timely listing for transplantation
Younger patients would benefit greatly from kidney transplantation. Their expected remaining lifetime may even be doubled by having a transplant. 'We have to do all we can to get young patients listed for transplantation as soon as possible, preferably pre-emptively', says Professor Luuk Hilbrands, Chair of the DESCARTES working group of the ERA-EDTA. A proposal for the work-up of low-risk kidney transplant candidates has now been published for that reason. (2019-01-22)

Timely referral to kidney transplant may improve survival for patients with lupus nephritis
Patients with lupus nephritis and end stage renal disease may benefit from timely kidney transplant, as transplantation was associated with a significant increase in survival in a nationwide cohort study. The main reason for the overall survival benefit was fewer deaths due to cardiovascular disease and infections. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-01-21)

New therapeutic avenue in the fight against chronic liver disease
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. (2019-01-18)

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