Current Chronic Kidney Disease News and Events | Page 3

Current Chronic Kidney Disease News and Events, Chronic Kidney Disease News Articles.
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Black churches are trusted messengers of COVID-19 information to their communities
U.S. public health officials have reported that Black communities are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. As the number of COVID-19 cases across the U.S. surge, Mayo Clinic researchers are working closely with Black churches on disparities in emergency preparedness and providing access to culturally relevant, evidence-based health information. The early results of this research were published Thursday, Dec. 10, in Preventing Chronic Disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) public health journal. (2020-12-10)

How blood and wealth can predict future disability
Research shows that blood tests for biomarkers such as cholesterol and inflammation can predict disability in five years. Researchers studied blood biomarkers of 5,286 participants involved in the UK Household Longitudinal Study - and found that biological health can predict disability and healthcare demand in five years' time. They also found that people on higher-incomes were more likely to seek GP appointments and outpatient treatments for their medical problems. (2020-12-09)

UL, Ireland, research finds promising treatment to protect kidney function in diabetes
A clinical trial involving researchers at University of Limerick, Ireland has demonstrated the potential benefits of new drugs in protecting kidney function in diabetes. (2020-12-09)

Ability to predict C-diff mortality nearly doubled with new guidelines
Updated national guidelines for treating infections caused by the deadly superbug Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) have been examined and approved by a nationally renowned C. diff researcher at University of Houston and his team of students. (2020-12-09)

Glyphosate can create biomarkers predicting disease in future generations
Exposure to the widely used weed-killer glyphosate makes genetic changes to rats that can be linked to increased disease in their grandchildren and great-grandchildren. These glyphosate-induced changes to sperm from exposed rats could be used as biomarkers for determining propensity in subsequent generations for prostate and kidney diseases as well as obesity and incurring multiple diseases at once. (2020-12-09)

Large US study confirms COVID-19 complications: lung, kidney and cardiovascular issues
A large study of patients in the United States who contracted coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) confirms many complications of the disease, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-12-08)

Kidney injury in diabetic ketoacidosis linked to brain injury
Researchers have identified factors that make children with diabetic ketoacidosis more likely to experience acute kidney injury. Analyzing data from a large, multicenter clinical trial, the researchers also found that children who experience acute kidney injury are more likely to also experience subtle cognitive impairment and demonstrate lower IQ scores, suggesting a pattern of multiple organ injury. (2020-12-04)

First in nation treatment for chronic subdural hematoma at Los Robles Health System
Los Robles Health System is leading the way in neurovascular clinical trials. Interventional neurologist, Dr. Asif Taqi, is the principal investigator of the STEM Study, a landmark trial that can change the management of chronic subdural hematomas completely. Los Robles enrolled and treated the first patient in the nation into this trial. (2020-12-04)

Amino acid connected to NAFLD could provide treatment clues
Basic science research explores the effects of impaired glycine metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - and how to potentially use glycine-based treatment to help people with NAFLD. (2020-12-03)

Patients with kidney disease may delay AVF creation
Many patients start hemodialysis with temporary vascular access despite regular kidney care and pre-dialysis education. Delay is often related to patient choice but research on patients' perspectives is limited. In this study, researchers surveyed pre-dialysis patients and their family members about their perceptions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their intentions to undergo access creation. They also report on a new survey instrument to measure attitudes towards hemodialysis preparation. (2020-12-03)

Differences in immunity and blood vessels likely protect children from severe COVID-19
Differences in the immune systems and better blood vessel health were among the factors protecting children from severe COVID-19, according to a new review. (2020-12-02)

Healthy muscles are a carrot on a string for healthy lungs
Scientists show effectiveness of carrot-based Japanese herbal medicine called ''Ninjin'yoeito'' in improving muscle atrophy in the hind legs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke through an increased expression of PGC-1α, positioning the medicine as a potential treatment for sarcopenia frailty-related complications with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Their findings were published online in the international scientific journal ''International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease'' on November 27, 2020. (2020-12-02)

Rethinking race and kidney function
Removing race from clinical tools that calculate kidney function could have both advantages and disadvantages for Black patients. (2020-12-02)

Kidney disease leading risk factor for COVID-related hospitalization
An analysis of Geisinger's electronic health records has revealed chronic kidney disease to be the leading risk factor for hospitalization from COVID-19. (2020-12-02)

Cancer cases are rising in adolescents and young adults
Cancer cases in adolescents and young adults have risen by 30% during the last four decades, with kidney cancer rising at the greatest rate, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The team said further research into screening, diagnosis and treatment are needed to address the growing trend in this age group. (2020-12-01)

Why long-suffering hosts grow a thick skin
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that the skin fibrosis seen in chronic graft-versus-host disease is mediated by transforming growth factor-β1 expressed by epidermal cells undergoing programmed death when they are stimulated by interferon-γ. Further investigations elucidate the sclerodermatous changes characteristic of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as systemic sclerosis, discoid lupus erythematosus and toxic epidermal necrolysis, thus opening up research avenues in pharmacotherapeutics based on targeting apoptosis and interferon-γ. (2020-12-01)

Liver cirrhosis: Disease progression
Patients with liver cirrhosis display a wide range of clinical symptoms. A prospective study conducted by MedUni Vienna has now shown that blood levels of biomarkers for systemic inflammation increase over the various stages of the disease and can predict the development of complications, even in previously asymptomatic patients. (2020-11-30)

The number of times a person gives birth may affect how quickly they age
Having children doesn't just make you feel like you've aged overnight -- a new study led by Penn State researchers found that the number of times a person gives birth may also affect the body's physical aging process. (2020-11-30)

A tricky kidney puzzle
By analyzing the gene expression of single cells, algorithms are able to not only reconstruct their original location in the tissue, but also to determine details about their function. Teams led by Kai Schmidt-Ott and Nikolaus Rajewsky have published their findings in JASN, using the kidney as an example. (2020-11-27)

Survival protein may prevent collateral damage during cancer therapy
Australian researchers have identified a protein that could protect the kidneys from 'bystander' damage caused by cancer therapies. The 'cell survival protein', called BCL-XL, was required in laboratory models to keep kidney cells alive and functioning during exposure to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Kidney damage is a common side effect of these widely used cancer therapies, and the discovery has shed light on how this damage occurs at the molecular level. (2020-11-25)

RASi associated with reduced risk of KRT compared with CCB in CKD patients
In a population-based Swedish database, researchers studied the clinical outcomes of starting renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASi) or calcium channel blockers (CCB) in 2,458 patients with CKD G4-5. Compared with CCB, RASi initiation was associated with a lower risk of KRT, but similar risks of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings suggest that RASi initiation might slow the progression of kidney disease compared with CCB in patients with advanced CKD, and offer similar cardiovascular protection. (2020-11-24)

Research shows bariatric surgery may reduce severity of COVID-19 in patients with obesity
A Cleveland Clinic study shows that among patients who have obesity and who tested positive for COVID-19, a past history of bariatric surgery was significantly associated with a lower risk of hospital and intensive care unit admission. The results were published in the journal of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. (2020-11-24)

Non-invasive electrolyte levels' measuring method can prevent sudden cardiac death
Researchers from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania came up with the idea on how to measure fluctuating blood potassium levels non-invasively, through electrocardiogram. The researchers claim that their method may become a digital biomarker in the future for managing electrolyte levels. This would be a huge step towards preventing potentially life-threatening conditions among people who suffer from chronic kidney disease. (2020-11-23)

Researchers use cutting edge technology to bioprint mini-kidneys
Researchers have used cutting edge technology to bioprint miniature human kidneys in the lab, paving the way for new treatments for kidney failure and possibly lab-grown transplants. (2020-11-23)

More than 1.1 million deaths among Medicare recipients due to high cost of drugs
WASHINGTON, DC and SAN DIEGO, CA - Nov. 19, 2020 - More than 1.1 million Medicare patients could die over the next decade because they cannot afford to pay for their prescription medications, according to a new study released today by the West Health Policy Center, a nonprofit and nonpartisan policy research group and Xcenda, the research arm of the drug distributor AmerisourceBergen. (2020-11-19)

Afro-Caribbean patients with severe kidney disease at greater risk of hospitalisation from COVID-19
Afro-Caribbean people with end stage kidney disease (ESKD) are more likely to be hospitalised with COVID-19 than other ethnicities, a study has found. (2020-11-19)

Gut microbiome link to deadly lung disease
Research led by the Centenary Institute, the University of Technology Sydney and the University of Queensland has shown for the first time a link between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an often fatal lung condition, and the gut microbiome. (2020-11-19)

New diabetes medication reduced heart event risk in those with diabetes and kidney disease
Sotagliflozin - a type of medication known as an SGLT2 inhibitor primarily prescribed for Type 2 diabetes - reduces the risk of adverse cardiovascular events for patients with diabetes and kidney disease. Researchers say the results of this randomized clinical trial provide evidence that SGLT2 inhibitors should be part of the standard of care for people with Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. (2020-11-17)

New medication helps heart health in people with chronic kidney disease, Type 2 diabetes
Results of a large, international clinical trial on the novel medication finerenone indicate it reduced the rate of death, heart attack, stroke and hospitalization for heart failure among patients with chronic kidney disease and Type 2 diabetes. Finerenone helped patients with chronic conditions improve their heart health, regardless of if they had a history of cardiovascular disease. (2020-11-17)

Smartphone use offers tool to treat MS, other diseases
Monitoring how patients with multiple sclerosis or other degenerative diseases use their smartphones could provide valuable information to help get them better treatment. In the journal Chaos, researchers used an app to record the keystroke dynamics of a control group and those of subjects in various stages of MS treatment. In doing so, they observed changes in the way people with MS typed that were not seen in subjects who did not have the disease. (2020-11-17)

High-dose equal to standard flu vaccine for risk of death or heart, lung hospitalization
A high-dose, trivalent influenza vaccine was no more effective than the standard-dose quadrivalent vaccine at reducing the risk of death or hospitalization for heart or lung-related causes among patients with heart disease. While overall there were few serious side effects in both vaccine groups, those who received the high-dose vaccine had more injection-related side effects such as pain, swelling and muscle aches. (2020-11-17)

Home oxygen therapy for adults with COPD and ILD: New ATS clinical practice guideline
The latest clinical practice guideline on home oxygen therapy addresses long-term and ambulatory oxygen therapy for adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and interstitial lung disease (ILD) and includes the most comprehensive review of the evidence of any oxygen guideline to date. (2020-11-17)

Chronic alcohol use reshapes the brain's immune landscape, driving anxiety and addiction
Deep within the brain, a small almond-shaped region called the amygdala plays a vital role in how we exhibit emotion, behavior and motivation; it's also strongly implicated in alcohol abuse. Now, for the first time, a Scripps Research team has identified important changes to anti-inflammatory mechanisms and cellular activity in the amygdala that drive alcohol addiction. (2020-11-16)

SCORED and SOLOIST trials add to evidence for treating diabetes with SGLT2 inhibitors
In these two paired trials, teams of investigators led by Brigham cardiologist Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH, evaluated sotagliflozin, a drug that inhibits SGLT2 and SGLT1. Results of the trials are both published in The New England Journal of Medicine and presented by Bhatt simultaneously at the Late-Breaking Clinical Trial Sessions of the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. (2020-11-16)

How to ensure patients manage their chronic kidney disease
A Singapore study finds patients with chronic kidney disease need tailored nutrition guidance, as well as better communication with doctors and family support, to empower them to manage their condition. (2020-11-13)

New medicine reduced risk for heart failure emergencies, hospital visits
Results from a large, Phase 3, global, cardiovascular outcomes study indicate a new medication may reduce the risk for heart failure-related events or cardiovascular deaths in people with chronic heart failure. (2020-11-13)

Early-life events linked to lung health in young adulthood
Early-life events, such as the exposure to air pollutants, increases the risk of chronic lung disease in young adulthood, according to new results by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, published in the European Respiratory Journal and Thorax. The studies add to the growing evidence that chronic lung disease in adulthood can be traced back to childhood. (2020-11-12)

Rats also capable of transmitting hantavirus
A group of researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have confirmed Germany's first-ever case of animal-to-human transmission involving a specific species of virus known as the 'Seoul virus'. Working alongside colleagues from Friedrich-Loeffer-Institut (FLI), the researchers were able to confirm the presence of the virus in a young female patient and her pet rat. (2020-11-12)

Vaping may increase respiratory disease risk by more than 40%: BU study
A growing body of evidence points to the health risks of using e-cigarettes (or ''vaping''). But because e-cigarettes are marketed as a less harmful alternative to traditional cigarettes, it has been difficult to tell whether the association between vaping and disease is just a matter of smokers switching to vaping when they start experiencing health issues. (2020-11-12)

UC research finds low rates of contraceptive use in women with kidney failure
New research from the University of Cincinnati finds that women with kidney failure have low rates of contraceptive use. The study, published in the journal Kidney Medicine, finds an overall contraceptive use rate of 5.3% among women with kidney failure undergoing dialysis in the United States. (2020-11-12)

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