Current Chronic Pain News and Events | Page 2

Current Chronic Pain News and Events, Chronic Pain News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought. Social pain, which typically results from interpersonal rejection or abuse, has been viewed as a non-medical response to external factors. However, recent research suggests that some physical and social stress responses may arise because of shared processing in the brain. (2021-01-12)

Post-surgical patch releases non-opioid painkiller directly to the wound
A Duke-led team of scientists has developed a bio-compatible surgical patch that releases non-opioid painkillers directly to the site of a wound for days and then dissolves away. The polymer patch provides a controlled release of a drug that blocks the enzyme COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2,) which drives pain and inflammation. The study appears Jan. 10, 2021 in the Journal of Controlled Release. (2021-01-11)

Penn Medicine surgeons develop universal patient-reported outcomes tool to improve hernia care
Penn Medicine researchers have successfully developed, tested, and implemented a first-of-its-kind, patient-informed questionnaire tool for ventral hernia repair surgery patients that could be broadly used to improve the way clinicians care for patients and potentially outcomes. (2021-01-11)

More than half of people using cannabis for pain experience multiple withdrawal symptoms
More than half of people who use medical marijuana products to ease pain also experience clusters of multiple withdrawal symptoms when they're between uses, a new study finds. And about 10% of the patients taking part in the study experienced worsening changes to their sleep, mood, mental state, energy and appetite over the next two years as they continued to use cannabis. (2021-01-08)

Social transmission of pain, fear has different targets in mouse brain
Social contact can transfer the feeling of pain or fear in several animal species, including humans, but the exact neural mechanisms for this transmission are still being studied. (2021-01-07)

How can we help victims of torture?
Torture victims often reap less benefit from ordinary treatment. New insight might give new hope. (2021-01-06)

uOttawa study shows that mindfulness can help ease the pain of breast cancer survivors
A study led by University of Ottawa researchers provides empirical evidence that mindfulness has a significant impact on the brain of women suffering from neuropathic pain related to breast cancer treatment. The researchers showed that mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) helps modulate neuropathic pain. (2021-01-06)

The link between opioid medication and pancreatic cancer
Using Center for Disease Control's national population health and cancer statistics datasets, Rush University Medical Center researchers determined that a state's opioid death rate significantly predicted the trend in the incidence of pancreatic cancer years later. This is the first study showing opioid use may be a risk factor contributing to the increasing incidence of pancreatic cancer (2021-01-06)

Pollen levels might trigger flares of urologic chronic pelvic pain
As anyone living with hay fever can attest, days with high pollen counts can bring attacks of sneezing, nasal congestion and other allergy symptoms. Now, a new study suggests rising pollen levels may also trigger flare-ups of pain and other symptoms in patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS), reports The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-05)

Nanoparticle drug-delivery system developed to treat brain disorders
To facilitate successful delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain, a team of bioengineers, physicians, and collaborators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital created a nanoparticle platform, which can facilitate therapeutically effective delivery of encapsulated agents in mice with a physically breached or intact BBB. In a mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), they observed that the delivery system showed three times more accumulation in brain than conventional methods of delivery. (2021-01-01)

Common brain malformation traced to its genetic roots
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that Chiari 1 malformation can be caused by variations in two genes linked to brain development, and that children with large heads are at increased risk of developing the condition. (2020-12-28)

Immersive virtual reality boosts the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain
For patients receiving spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for chronic pain, integration with an immersive virtual reality (VR) system - allowing patients to see as well as feel the effects of electrical stimulation on a virtual image of their own body - can enhance the pain-relieving effectiveness of SCS, reports a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-12-23)

Cannabis use blunts stress reactivity in female rats
Female rats that inhaled vaporized cannabis daily for a month developed a blunted physiological response to stress, according to a new study by Washington State University researchers. In contrast, male rats that were provided access to the same potency of cannabis over the same 30-day window did not experience any physiological changes in how they responded to a stressful situation. (2020-12-22)

Perspective: Why opioids cannot fix chronic pain
New epidemiological and neuroscientific evidence suggests that the relationship between chronic pain and emotional distress is bidirectional. Pain experts at University of Washington School of Medicine explain the relation in Annals of Family Medicine. (2020-12-22)

How one pain suppresses the other
When two painful stimuli act on us at the same time, we perceive the one of them as less painful. This phenomenon is part of the body's own pain control system. A disfunction of this inhibition is associated with chronic pain disorders. Researchers at Berufsgenossenschaftliches Universitätsklinikum Bergmannsheil, clinic of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), have developed a method for this. They were able to show that the method works effectively with both painful electrical stimuli and heat pain. (2020-12-21)

Targeted brain stimulation dulls social pain
Pairing brain stimulation with an emotion management technique blunts negative emotions, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The combination may improve emotional regulation in people with psychiatric disorders. (2020-12-21)

Study sets baseline for sleep patterns in healthy adult dogs
A new canine sleep study could serve as a baseline for research on chronic pain and cognitive dysfunction in dogs, potentially improving detection and treatment of these conditions. (2020-12-18)

Finding a personalized approach to treating chronic rejection after lung transplantation
By studying the roles of an inflammatory protein and antibodies in chronic rejection after lung transplantation, researchers discover possibilities for new treatments. (2020-12-17)

Neuroendovascular procedures linked to patient back pain
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care performed a prospective study of neuroendovascular patients and found more than 40% suffered back pain during the procedure, signaling a need for clinicians to be more proactive in addressing this complaint. (2020-12-17)

New guideline supports behavioral, psychological treatments for insomnia
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has published a new clinical practice guideline establishing recommendations for the use of behavioral and psychological treatments for chronic insomnia disorder in adults. (2020-12-16)

Clowns may help children cope with the pain and anxiety of hospital treatment
Hospital clowns might help improve physical symptoms and psychological wellbeing in children and adolescents having treatment for acute or chronic conditions, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Exercise for low back pain beneficial but no one agrees on why
A new UNSW evidence review has found there is still no consensus between researchers about why exercise works for low back pain patients - despite decades of studies on the topic. (2020-12-16)

Mindfulness meditation may decrease impact of migraine
In a recent clinical trial from Wake Forest Baptist Health, researchers showed that mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) may provide benefit to people with migraine. (2020-12-14)

Patients with non-cardiac chest pain are reassured with brief education
Patients diagnosed with non-cardiac chest pain are reluctant to believe they do not have heart disease. A new study shows that explaining the test results convinces patients and reduces the likelihood of future chest pain. The research is presented at EACVI - Best of Imaging 2020, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Chest pain is one of the most frequent causes of consults at the emergency department. (2020-12-12)

When it comes to feeling pain, touch or an itch, location matters
When you touch a hot stove, your hand reflexively pulls away; if you miss a rung on a ladder, you instinctively catch yourself. Both motions take a fraction of a second and require no forethought. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have mapped the physical organization of cells in the spinal cord that help mediate these and similar critical ''sensorimotor reflexes.'' (2020-12-10)

Under-recognition of symptoms may be common in breast cancer patients receiving radiation
Among patients with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy, under-recognition of symptoms was common in reports of pain, pruritus, edema, and fatigue, with younger patients and Black patients having significantly increased odds of symptom under-recognition. (2020-12-09)

Smartphone data shows real-time impact on health
Researchers at Cornell University are using smartphones to capture location and real-time survey data to examine how social environments encountered in everyday life may affect health. (2020-12-08)

Trench fever in urban people who are homeless
A disease common during the First World War, trench fever, has been found in some urban populations experiencing homelessness in Canada, and physicians should be aware of this potentially fatal disease, highlights a practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-12-07)

First in nation treatment for chronic subdural hematoma at Los Robles Health System
Los Robles Health System is leading the way in neurovascular clinical trials. Interventional neurologist, Dr. Asif Taqi, is the principal investigator of the STEM Study, a landmark trial that can change the management of chronic subdural hematomas completely. Los Robles enrolled and treated the first patient in the nation into this trial. (2020-12-04)

Kidney disease leading risk factor for COVID-related hospitalization
An analysis of Geisinger's electronic health records has revealed chronic kidney disease to be the leading risk factor for hospitalization from COVID-19. (2020-12-02)

After CDC guidance, little change in opioid prescriptions to those at risk of misuse
Research from Saint Louis University finds that among patients at risk for opioid misuse, the odds of receiving a Schedule II opioid (those with high abuse potential) for non-cancer pain were similar to those not at risk, despite new prescribing guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). (2020-12-02)

Autism study suggests connection between repetitive behaviors, gut problems
In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties. (2020-12-02)

Post-COVID pain or weakness? Request an ultrasound or MRI
A new Northwestern Medicine study shows how advanced imaging technology can pinpoint what may have caused patients' nerve damage and help determine the best course of treatment. (2020-12-01)

Kids' TV teaching children wrong lessons about pain -- new study
New analysis of children's TV and film suggests that too often it portrays pain as something arising only through violent act or injury when instead it could do more to educate young people about much more common, everyday pain. (2020-12-01)

Does your pain feel different in English and Spanish?
In a recent study, University of Miami graduate student Morgan Gianola hoped to clarify how such psychological differences across languages might also relate to changes in physical and emotional experiences, like pain. (2020-11-30)

New mechanism of pain control revealed
Researchers have identified a unique population of astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of mice that produces pain hypersensitivity when activated by neurons carrying signals down from the brain. The findings indicate that the role of descending neurons in controlling spinal pain transmission is not limited to suppression and point to this group of astrocytes as a new target for enhancing the effect of chronic pain treatments. (2020-11-25)

New breakthrough in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis
People with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) could soon benefit from a new drug treatment, otilimab, that not only suppresses inflammation but also significantly reduces patient reported pain scores. (2020-11-25)

Tarantula toxin attacks with molecular stinger
A bird-catching Chinese tarantula bite contains a stinger-like poison that plunges into a molecular target in the electrical signaling system of their prey's nerve cells. New cryo-electron microscopy studies show how this venom traps the voltage sensors of sodium channels in a resting state so they can't be activated. Such research may suggest designs for better drugs for chronic pain. (2020-11-23)

Emergency imaging trends in pediatric vs. adult patients for abdominal pain
According to AJR, although pediatric CT use has decreased for the evaluation of abdominal pain (perhaps due to implementing an ultrasound-first strategy for suspected appendicitis), CT use has continued to increase among adults with abdominal pain in U.S. emergency department (ED) visits. Although trends in CT use have previously been reported for children and adults, this study is the first to contrast the two cohorts in the ED setting in a nationally representative sample. (2020-11-20)

One in four older refugees are in psychological distress -- even decades after resettlement
A new study of Canadians aged 45-85, released this week in the International Journal of Social Psychiatry, found that 24% of refugees were in psychological distress compared to 13% of non-refugee immigrants and those born in Canada. (2020-11-19)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.