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Current Circadian Clock News and Events, Circadian Clock News Articles.
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Research on environmental history: 330-year-old poplar tree tells of its life
Similar to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, i.e. gene modifications that do not occur on the primary DNA sequence, sometimes arise accidentally in plants and can be transmitted across generations. Using trees as a model, researchers have now shown for the first time that these so-called epimutations accumulate continuously throughout plant development, and that they can be employed as a molecular clock to estimate the age of a tree. (2020-11-18)

Solitary bees are born with a functional internal clock - unlike honeybees
Individuals of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis show a 24-h behavioral cycle as soon as they emerge, unlike young honeybee workers who need to perform brood care around the clock and only develop a daily cycle later in life. This is reflected in a difference in the rate of brain development: in O. bicornis, but not in honeybees, neurons producing the ''pacemaker'' neuromodulator PDF are already maximally active immediately upon emergence. Sociality seems to have promoted a delay in maturation of the internal clock. (2020-11-16)

Advanced atomic clock makes a better dark matter detector
JILA researchers have used a state-of-the-art atomic clock to narrow the search for elusive dark matter, an example of how continual improvements in clocks have value beyond timekeeping. (2020-11-12)

Internal clocks drive beta cell regeneration
Our body can repair itself after a damage. This phenomenon describes how cells that are still functional start to proliferate to compensate for the loss. By studying diabetic mice, scientists from the University of Geneva and the University Hospitals of Geneva, observed that this regeneration mechanism was under the influence of circadian rhythms, allowing new perspectives to be envisaged to promote beta cell regeneration. (2020-11-11)

Study dives into genetic risk of Alzheimer's and dementia for diverse Latinx groups
To better understand the association of the APOE gene with cognitive decline in Latinx populations, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and collaborators analyzed metrics of cognitive decline in six diverse Latinx populations: those of Cuban, Central American, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American backgrounds. They found that the APOE-ε4 genetic variant was associated with risk of cognitive decline in Latinx populations, with the strongest effect among those of Cuban backgrounds. (2020-11-06)

Biological clock and extra gene pairs control important plant functions
New understanding of circadian rhythms could be key to stronger, drought-resistant crops in the face of climate change. (2020-11-05)

Scientists discover how a common mutation leads to 'night owl' sleep disorder
People with delayed sleep phase disorder are unable to fall asleep until late at night (often after 2 a.m.) and have difficulty getting up in the morning. In 2017, scientists discovered a surprisingly common mutation that causes this sleep disorder by altering a key component of the biological clock that maintains the body's daily rhythms. Now, a new study reveals the molecular mechanisms involved and point the way toward potential treatments. (2020-10-27)

Timekeeping theory combines quantum clocks and Einstein's relativity
Cool research story with connections to atomic clocks, Einstein and quantum mechanics. The research shows the 'spooky' interference that can impact even the most sophisticated clocks. (2020-10-23)

Researchers identify how night-shift work causes internal clock confusion
Night-shift workers face an increased risk of obesity and diabetes, but the underlying reason for that has been a mystery. Now, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have found a potential cause for metabolic changes during night-shift work that creates confusion between cells in the body and the central clock in the brain. (2020-10-22)

Research finds that blue-light glasses improve sleep and workday productivity
During the pandemic, the amount of screen time for many people working and learning from home as well as binge-watching TV has sharply increased. New research finds that wearing blue-light glasses just before sleeping can lead to a better night's sleep and contribute to a better day's work to follow. (2020-10-15)

Researchers deconstruct the "biological clock" that regulates birdsong
The precise timing of a bird's complex song is driven in part by the often-ignored ''wires'' connecting neurons in the bird's brain, according to a new study. A team of researchers from Penn State and New York University has deconstructed an important ''biological clock'' that regulates birdsong and other behaviors, leading to new ways of thinking about the function of neuronal networks. (2020-10-15)

A new protein discovered that repairs DNA
Our cells have DNA repair systems to defend themselves against this sort of damage. One of these systems is based on a protein, photolysis, which uses blue light to repair DNA damage before it leads to mutations. (2020-10-14)

Scientists show jet lag conditions impair immune response in mice
International researchers publishing in Science Advances reveal in a mouse study that chronic jet lag alters the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells, making it more favorable for tumor growth, and also hinders the body's natural immune defenses. (2020-10-14)

Physical activity in the morning could be most beneficial against cancer
The time of day when we exercise could affect the risk of cancer due to circadian disruption, according to a new study with about 3,000 Spanish people   (2020-10-13)

Olympic athletes should be mindful of their biological clocks
Biological clocks have sizeable effects on the performance of elite athletes. This conclusion was drawn by chronobiologists from the University of Groningen after studying the times achieved by swimmers in four different Olympic Games. Shifting the clock to reach peak performance at the right time could make the difference between winning and losing. The results were published on 8 October in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-10-08)

Signals from distant stars connect optical atomic clocks across Earth for the first time
Using radio telescopes observing distant stars, scientists have connected optical atomic clocks on different continents. The results were published in the scientific journal Nature Physics by an international collaboration between 33 astronomers and clock experts at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan), the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM, Italy), the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF, Italy), and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM, France). (2020-10-08)

Tuned lighting helps nursing home residents get better sleep, study finds
A study led by researchers at the Brown University School of Public Health found that using tuned LED lighting cut in half the number of sleep disturbances among older residents in long-term care. (2020-10-06)

Hunting for the lowest known nuclear-excited state
Measurements in thorium-229 take a step towards the direct laser excitation of an atomic nucleus in this unique isotope (2020-10-06)

Stroke alarm clock may streamline and accelerate time-sensitive acute stroke care
An interactive, digital alarm clock may speed emergency stroke care, starting at hospital arrival and through each step of the time-sensitive treatment process. The alarm clock is a low-cost strategy for streamlining stroke care and could translate to fewer deaths and less disability from stroke. (2020-09-24)

Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
Many humans live to see their 80s, some even reach 100. But chimpanzees rarely make it past 50, despite sharing 99% of our genetic code. While modern medicine has added years to human lifespans, a study points to a more ancient explanation why humans are the long-lived primate. Part of the secret to human longevity may lie in chemical changes to our DNA that slowed the rate of aging after human ancestors diverged from chimps. (2020-09-20)

Time-restricted feeding improves health without altering the body's core clock
For the first time, scientists have studied the early effects of time-restricted feeding on the daily periodic oscillations of metabolites and genes in muscle, and metabolites in blood. The findings by scientists at the University of Copenhagen, the Australian Catholic University and Karolinska Institutet find that time-restricted feeding does not influence the muscle's core clock, and opens the door to more research on how these observed changes improve health. (2020-09-17)

Humans develop more slowly than mice because our chemistry is different
Scientists have found that the ''segmentation clock''--a genetic network that governs the body pattern formation of embryos--progresses more slowly in humans than in mice because the biochemical reactions are slower in human cells. The differences in the speeds of biochemical reactions may underlie differences between species in the tempo of development. (2020-09-17)

Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development. The research illustrates that crop pests and insect disease vectors with similar biology may rapidly respond to changing climates by a similar genetic mechanism. (2020-09-17)

How the brain's inner clock measures seconds
UCLA researchers have pinpointed a second hand to the brain's internal clock. By revealing how and where the brain counts and represents seconds, the UCLA discovery will expand scientists' understanding of normal and abnormal brain function. (2020-09-17)

TRESK regulates brain to track time using sunlight as its cue
Research from the University of Kent has found that TRESK, a calcium regulated two-pore potassium channel, regulates the brain's central circadian clock to differentiate behaviour between day and night. (2020-09-14)

Researchers probe Soldier sleep deprivation effects
New Army-funded study looks at effects of sleep deprivation, which can greatly affect Soldiers on the battlefield. Research conducted at the University of Rochester Medical Center and funded by the Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory, suggests that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk for developing neurological disorders. (2020-09-03)

Circadian rhythms help guide waste from brain
New research details how the complex set of molecular and fluid dynamics that comprise the glymphatic system - the brain's unique process of waste removal - are synchronized with the master internal clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle. These findings suggest that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk for developing neurological disorders. (2020-09-02)

Daylight study reveals how animals adapt between seasons
Scientists have discovered how a biological switch helps animals make the seasonal changes crucial for survival, such as growing a warm winter coat and adjusting body temperatures. (2020-08-27)

American Academy of Sleep Medicine calls for elimination of daylight saving time
Public health and safety would benefit from eliminating daylight saving time, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2020-08-27)

NBA playoff format is optimizing competitive balance by eliminating travel
In addition to helping protect players from COVID-19, the NBA 'bubble' in Orlando may be a competitive equalizer by eliminating team travel. Researchers analyzing the results of nearly 500 NBA playoff games over six seasons found that a team's direction of travel and the number of time zones crossed were associated with its predicted win probability and actual game performance. (2020-08-25)

Sleep duration, efficiency and structure change in space
It's hard to get a good night's sleep in space. An evaluation of astronauts serving on the Mir space station found that they experienced shorter sleep durations, more wakefulness, and changes in the structure of their sleep cycles while in microgravity. (2020-08-25)

First ever observation of 'time crystals' interacting
For the first time ever, scientists have witnessed the interaction of a new phase of matter known as 'time crystals'. The discovery may lead to applications in quantum information processing. First theorised in 2012 by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek and identified in 2016, time crystals exhibit the bizarre property of being in constant, repeating motion in time despite no external input. (2020-08-17)

Pinpointing the cells that keep the body's master circadian clock ticking
UT Southwestern scientists have developed a genetically engineered mouse and imaging system that lets them visualize fluctuations in the circadian clocks of cell types in mice. The method, described online in the journal Neuron, gives new insight into which brain cells are important in maintaining the body's master circadian clock. But they say the approach will also be broadly useful for answering questions about the daily rhythms of cells throughout the body. (2020-08-07)

Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
Researchers at Nagoya University have found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae. The findings could be applied to green algae to produce larger amounts of lipids, which are a possible sustainable source of biofuel. (2020-08-05)

NAU biologist part of international team to sequence genome of rare 'living fossil'
Northern Arizona University assistant professor Marc Tollis is one of a dozen collaborators sequencing the genome of the tuatara, a lizard-like creature that lives on the islands of New Zealand. This groundbreaking research was done in partnership with the Māori people of New Zealand, (2020-08-05)

Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)

Study reveals how different mosquitoes respond to light and ti
In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day. Mosquitoes are among major disease vectors impacting humans and animals around the world and the findings have important implications for using light to control them. (2020-07-27)

Neural vulnerability in Huntington's disease tied to release of mitochondrial RNA
A uniquely comprehensive survey of gene expression by cell type in humans and mice revealed several deficits affecting the most vulnerable neurons in Huntigton's disease. (2020-07-17)

Space to grow, or grow in space -- how vertical farms could be ready to take-off
Vertical farms with their soil-free, computer-controlled environments may sound like sci-fi. But there is a growing environmental and economic case for them, according to new research laying out radical ways of putting food on our plates. (2020-07-14)

Back to the future: new study could lead to bumper crops
Research led by scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) could lead to major improvements in crop production. The study shows a new way to help study and ramp up photosynthesis. (2020-07-14)

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