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Current Circadian Clock News and Events, Circadian Clock News Articles.
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Pregnancy shifts the daily schedule forward
New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that women and mice both shift their daily schedules earlier by up to a few hours during the first third of their pregnancy. (2019-04-30)
Circadian rhythm disruption tips the cell-cycle balance toward tumor growth
Disrupting normal circadian rhythms promotes tumor growth and suppresses the effects of a tumor-fighting drug, according to a new study publishing April 30, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yool Lee, Amita Sehgal, and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania. (2019-04-30)
Chronic disruptions to circadian rhythms promote tumor growth, reduce efficacy of therapy
In a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at Penn Medicine show circadian disruptions trigger an increase in cell proliferation that, ultimately, shifts the cell-cycle balance and stimulates the growth of tumors in mice. (2019-04-30)
Study links gene to sleep problems in autism
Research conducted by a team of Washington State University researchers has found that sleep problems in patients with autism spectrum disorder may be linked to a mutation in the gene SHANK3 that in turn regulates the genes of the body's 24-hour day and night cycle. (2019-04-29)
Gestational diabetes in India and Sweden
Indian women are younger and leaner than Swedish women when they develop gestational diabetes, a new study from Lund University shows. (2019-04-26)
MRC researchers discover how eating feeds into the body clock
The Medical Research Council (MRC)-funded study, published today in the journal Cell, is the first to identify insulin as a primary signal that helps communicate the timing of meals to the cellular clocks located across our body, commonly known as the body clock. (2019-04-25)
Researchers create the first maps of two melatonin receptors essential for sleep
An international team of researchers used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to create the first detailed maps of two melatonin receptors that tell our bodies when to go to sleep or wake up and guide other biological processes. (2019-04-24)
A good night's sleep may be in sight
Having a map of the two cell receptors for melatonin could lead to better drugs to address insomnia or other conditions affected by those receptors. (2019-04-24)
Surrey academics weigh into the debate on daylight saving time and school start time
A switch to permanent daylight saving time will undo any positive effects on sleep of delaying school start times, according to researchers from the University of Surrey. (2019-04-22)
Permanent daylight savings may cancel out changes to school start times
Several states in the US, including California, Washington, Florida, and North Carolina, are now considering doing away with the practice by making daylight savings time (DST) permanent. (2019-04-22)
Two studies explore whether time of day can affect the body's response to exercise
Two papers appearing April 18, 2019 in the journal Cell Metabolism confirm that the circadian clock is an important factor in how the body responds to physical exertion. (2019-04-18)
In mice, feeding time influences the liver's biological clock
The timing of food intake is a major factor driving the rhythmic expression of most genes in the mouse liver, researchers report April 16, 2019 in the journal Cell Reports. (2019-04-16)
New super-accurate optical atomic clocks pass critical test
Researchers have measured an optical clock's ticking with record-breaking accuracy while also showing the clock can be operated with unprecedented consistency. (2019-04-11)
NASA Twins Study finds spaceflight affects gut bacteria
During his yearlong stay on the International Space Station (ISS), astronaut Scott Kelly experienced a shift in the ratio of two major categories of bacteria in his gut microbiome. (2019-04-11)
Research identifies genetic causes of poor sleep
The largest genetic study of its kind ever to use accelerometer data to examine how we slumber has uncovered a number of parts of our genetic code that could be responsible for causing poor sleep quality and duration. (2019-04-05)
U of G study reveals why heart failure patients suffer depression, impaired thinking
A new study by University of Guelph researchers explains why heart failure patients often have trouble with thinking and depression, pointing to ways to prevent and treat both heart and brain maladies through the emerging field of circadian medicine. (2019-04-05)
WVU researchers identify how light at night may harm outcomes in cardiac patients
In a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, West Virginia University neuroscientists linked white light at night--the kind that typically illuminates hospital rooms--to inflammation, brain-cell death and higher mortality risk in cardiac patients. (2019-04-03)
Circadian clock plays unexpected role in neurodegenerative diseases
Northwestern University researchers induced jet lag in a fruit fly model of Huntington disease and found that jet lag protected the flies' neurons. (2019-04-02)
Special journal issue highlights shift work science, solutions
Shift work and non-standard work schedules provide clear economic benefits in a 24/7 society, but also come with issues related to insufficient sleep, misalignment of the biological clock, and other factors that influence the safety, health and well-being of workers. (2019-04-01)
U of T Mississauga study identifies 'master pacemaker' for biological clocks
What makes a biological clock tick? According to a new study from U of T Mississauga, the surprising answer lies with a gene typically associated with stem and cancer cells. (2019-03-27)
BPA exposure during pregnancy can alter circadian rhythms
Exposure to the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy, even at levels lower than the regulated 'safe' human exposure level, can lead to changes in circadian rhythms, according to a mice study to be presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (2019-03-24)
Breast cancer may be likelier to spread to bone with nighttime dim-light exposure
Exposure to dim light at night, which is common in today's lifestyle, may contribute to the spread of breast cancer to the bones, researchers have shown for the first time in an animal study. (2019-03-23)
Sleep and ageing: Two sides of one coin?
Oxford University researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and ageing in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia. (2019-03-21)
It's spring already? Physics explains why time flies as we age
Duke University researchers have a new explanation for why those endless days of childhood seemed to last so much longer than they do now -- physics. (2019-03-20)
Testing the symmetry of space-time by means of atomic clocks
According to Einstein the speed of light is always the same. (2019-03-13)
Sussex scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo
Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock -- devices which could reduce our reliance on satellite mapping in the future -- using cutting-edge laser beam technology. (2019-03-11)
Blue-enriched white light to wake you up in the morning
Here is good news for those who have difficulty with morning alertness. (2019-03-06)
Optical clocks started the calibration of the international atomic time
Optical clocks of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) and LNE-SYRTE (Systemes de Reference Temps-Espace, Observatoire de Paris, Universite PSL, CNRS, Sorbonne Universite, France) evaluated the latest 'one second' tick of the International Atomic Time (TAI) and provided these data to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures to be referred for adjusting the tick rate of TAI. (2019-03-04)
Does extra sleep on the weekends repay your sleep debt? No, researchers say
Insufficient sleep and untreated sleep disorders put people at increased risk for metabolic problems, including obesity and diabetes. (2019-02-28)
Sleeping in on the weekend won't repay your sleep debt
Attempting to get extra sleep on the weekend to make up for lost sleep during the week has no lasting metabolic health benefits and can actually make our ability to regulate blood sugar worse, according to new University of Colorado Boulder research. (2019-02-28)
Infant sleep duration associated with mother's level of education and prenatal depression
A new study analyzing data from Canadian parents has found that babies sleep less at three months of age if their mothers do not have a university degree, experienced depression during pregnancy or had an emergency cesarean-section delivery. (2019-02-27)
Fat cells work different 'shifts' throughout the day
Fat cells in the human body have their own internal clocks and exhibit circadian rhythms affecting critical metabolic functions, new research in the journal Scientific Reports, finds. (2019-02-25)
Micro-control of liver metabolism
A new discovery has shed light on small RNAs called microRNAs in the liver that regulate fat and glucose metabolism. (2019-02-19)
Exercise in morning or afternoon to shift your body clock forward
Exercise can shift the human body clock, with the direction and amount of this effect depending on the time of day or night in which people exercise. (2019-02-19)
Uncovering a 'smoking gun' of biological aging clocks
A newly discovered ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clock can be used to accurately determine an individual's chronological and biological age, according to research led by Harvard T.H. (2019-02-14)
Researchers reveal brain connections that disadvantage night owls
'Night owls' -- those who go to bed and get up later -- have fundamental differences in their brain function compared to 'morning larks,' which mean they could be disadvantaged by the constraints of a normal working day. (2019-02-14)
Study helps solve mystery of how sleep protects against heart disease
Researchers say they are closer to solving the mystery of how a good night's sleep protects against heart disease. (2019-02-13)
Blood leukocytes mirror insufficient sleep
Prior studies have indicated that prolonged insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular diseases, dementia and psychiatric disorders. (2019-02-07)
Blood cells could hold master clock behind aging
Blood cells could hold the key to aging, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. (2019-02-07)
Shedding light on zebrafish daily rhythms: Clock gene functions revealed
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) used zebrafish to study the effects of knocking out three clock genes, Cry1a, Cry2a, and Per2. (2019-02-06)
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