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Current Circadian Rhythms News and Events, Circadian Rhythms News Articles.
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The rhythm of change: What a drum-beat experiment reveals about cultural evolution
Living organisms aren't the only things that evolve over time. Cultural practices change, too, and in recent years social scientists have taken a keen interest in understanding this cultural evolution. A new experiment used drum-beats to investigate the role that environment plays on cultural shifts, confirming that different environments do indeed give rise to different cultural patterns. (2020-10-27)

Researchers identify how night-shift work causes internal clock confusion
Night-shift workers face an increased risk of obesity and diabetes, but the underlying reason for that has been a mystery. Now, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have found a potential cause for metabolic changes during night-shift work that creates confusion between cells in the body and the central clock in the brain. (2020-10-22)

Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists revealed that, in the mutually beneficial relationship between with the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, an immune protein called ''macrophage migration inhibitory factor'' is the maestro of daily rhythms. (2020-10-19)

Research finds that blue-light glasses improve sleep and workday productivity
During the pandemic, the amount of screen time for many people working and learning from home as well as binge-watching TV has sharply increased. New research finds that wearing blue-light glasses just before sleeping can lead to a better night's sleep and contribute to a better day's work to follow. (2020-10-15)

A new protein discovered that repairs DNA
Our cells have DNA repair systems to defend themselves against this sort of damage. One of these systems is based on a protein, photolysis, which uses blue light to repair DNA damage before it leads to mutations. (2020-10-14)

Scientists show jet lag conditions impair immune response in mice
International researchers publishing in Science Advances reveal in a mouse study that chronic jet lag alters the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells, making it more favorable for tumor growth, and also hinders the body's natural immune defenses. (2020-10-14)

Physical activity in the morning could be most beneficial against cancer
The time of day when we exercise could affect the risk of cancer due to circadian disruption, according to a new study with about 3,000 Spanish people   (2020-10-13)

Smartphone data helps predict schizophrenia relapses
Passive data from smartphones -- including movement, ambient sound and sleep patterns -- can help predict episodes of schizophrenic relapse, according to new Cornell Tech research. (2020-10-13)

Olympic athletes should be mindful of their biological clocks
Biological clocks have sizeable effects on the performance of elite athletes. This conclusion was drawn by chronobiologists from the University of Groningen after studying the times achieved by swimmers in four different Olympic Games. Shifting the clock to reach peak performance at the right time could make the difference between winning and losing. The results were published on 8 October in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-10-08)

Tuned lighting helps nursing home residents get better sleep, study finds
A study led by researchers at the Brown University School of Public Health found that using tuned LED lighting cut in half the number of sleep disturbances among older residents in long-term care. (2020-10-06)

How the brain's inner clock measures seconds
UCLA researchers have pinpointed a second hand to the brain's internal clock. By revealing how and where the brain counts and represents seconds, the UCLA discovery will expand scientists' understanding of normal and abnormal brain function. (2020-09-17)

TRESK regulates brain to track time using sunlight as its cue
Research from the University of Kent has found that TRESK, a calcium regulated two-pore potassium channel, regulates the brain's central circadian clock to differentiate behaviour between day and night. (2020-09-14)

Researchers probe Soldier sleep deprivation effects
New Army-funded study looks at effects of sleep deprivation, which can greatly affect Soldiers on the battlefield. Research conducted at the University of Rochester Medical Center and funded by the Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory, suggests that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk for developing neurological disorders. (2020-09-03)

Circadian rhythms help guide waste from brain
New research details how the complex set of molecular and fluid dynamics that comprise the glymphatic system - the brain's unique process of waste removal - are synchronized with the master internal clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle. These findings suggest that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk for developing neurological disorders. (2020-09-02)

Keeping the beat - it's all in your brain
How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear? This basic ability, which allows people to cross the street safely while hearing oncoming traffic, dance to new music or perform team events such as rowing, has puzzled cognitive neuroscientists for years. A new study led by researchers at McGill University is shining a light on how auditory perception and motor processes work together. (2020-09-01)

Daylight study reveals how animals adapt between seasons
Scientists have discovered how a biological switch helps animals make the seasonal changes crucial for survival, such as growing a warm winter coat and adjusting body temperatures. (2020-08-27)

American Academy of Sleep Medicine calls for elimination of daylight saving time
Public health and safety would benefit from eliminating daylight saving time, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2020-08-27)

NBA playoff format is optimizing competitive balance by eliminating travel
In addition to helping protect players from COVID-19, the NBA 'bubble' in Orlando may be a competitive equalizer by eliminating team travel. Researchers analyzing the results of nearly 500 NBA playoff games over six seasons found that a team's direction of travel and the number of time zones crossed were associated with its predicted win probability and actual game performance. (2020-08-25)

A bright idea -- Genetically engineered proteins for studying neurons using light
In neuroscience, tools for controlling the activation and deactivation of individual nerve cells are crucial to gain insights into their functions and characteristics. Now, scientists from Okayama University, Japan, have produced mutant variants of a membrane protein that can effectively silence neurons when illuminated. The silencing effect can be quickly ''toggled'' on and off using green and red light sequentially, providing a more sophisticated tool than those currently available. (2020-08-18)

Pinpointing the cells that keep the body's master circadian clock ticking
UT Southwestern scientists have developed a genetically engineered mouse and imaging system that lets them visualize fluctuations in the circadian clocks of cell types in mice. The method, described online in the journal Neuron, gives new insight into which brain cells are important in maintaining the body's master circadian clock. But they say the approach will also be broadly useful for answering questions about the daily rhythms of cells throughout the body. (2020-08-07)

Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
Researchers at Nagoya University have found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae. The findings could be applied to green algae to produce larger amounts of lipids, which are a possible sustainable source of biofuel. (2020-08-05)

NAU biologist part of international team to sequence genome of rare 'living fossil'
Northern Arizona University assistant professor Marc Tollis is one of a dozen collaborators sequencing the genome of the tuatara, a lizard-like creature that lives on the islands of New Zealand. This groundbreaking research was done in partnership with the Māori people of New Zealand, (2020-08-05)

Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)

Alcohol abuse may raise risk of death in patients with abnormal heart rhythms
Among patients hospitalized with abnormal heart rhythms, those with alcohol abuse were 72% more likely to die before being discharged. Strategies to reduce problematic alcohol use may improve the health of patients with irregular heart rhythms and other heart problems. (2020-07-27)

Study reveals how different mosquitoes respond to light and ti
In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day. Mosquitoes are among major disease vectors impacting humans and animals around the world and the findings have important implications for using light to control them. (2020-07-27)

Wide awake: Light pollution keeps magpies and pigeons tossing and turning
La Trobe University and University of Melbourne researchers find light comparable in intensity to street lighting can disrupt the length, structure and intensity of sleep in magpies and pigeons (2020-07-23)

Music on the brain
A new study looks at differences between the brains of Japanese classical musicians, Western classical musicians and nonmusicians. Researchers investigated specific kinds of neural behavior in participants as they were exposed to unfamiliar rhythms and nonrhythmic patterns. Trained musicians showed greater powers of rhythmic prediction compared to nonmusicians, with more subtle differences between those trained in Japanese or Western classical music. This research has implications for studies of cultural impact on learning and brain development. (2020-07-20)

UCalgary research study finds MRI effective in predicting major cardiac events
An international study led by Dr. James White, a clinician and researcher at the University of Calgary finds magnetic resonance imaging can be used to predict major cardiac events for people diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy. White's study confirms about 40 per cent of patients with DCM have scarring patterns on their heart muscle which can be seen with MRI. These patterns are associated with higher risk of future heart failure admissions, life-threatening heart rhythms and death. (2020-07-15)

Space to grow, or grow in space -- how vertical farms could be ready to take-off
Vertical farms with their soil-free, computer-controlled environments may sound like sci-fi. But there is a growing environmental and economic case for them, according to new research laying out radical ways of putting food on our plates. (2020-07-14)

Pickled capers activate proteins important for human brain and heart health
A compound commonly found in pickled capers has been shown to activate proteins required for normal human brain and heart activity, and may even lead to future therapies for the treatment of epilepsy and abnormal heart rhythms. (2020-07-13)

Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work. (2020-07-09)

Outdoor light linked with teens' sleep and mental health
Research shows that adolescents who live in areas that have high levels of artificial light at night tend to get less sleep and are more likely to have a mood disorder relative to teens who live in areas with low levels of night-time light. The research was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health, and is published in JAMA Psychiatry. (2020-07-08)

How does spatial multi-scaled chimera state produce the diversity of brain rhythms?
This work revealed that the real brain network has a new chimera state -- spatial multi-scaled chimera state, and its formation is closely related the local symmetry of connections. (2020-07-03)

Understanding the circadian clocks of individual cells
Two new studies led by UT Southwestern scientists outline how individual cells maintain their internal clocks, driven both through heritable and random means. These findings, published online May 1 in PNAS and May 27 in eLife, help explain how organisms' circadian clocks maintain flexibility and could offer insights into aging and cancer. (2020-07-01)

Computational model decodes speech by predicting it
UNIGE scientists developed a neuro-computer model which helps explain how the brain identifies syllables in natural speech. The model uses the equivalent of neuronal oscillations produced by brain activity to process the continuous sound flow of connected speech. The model functions according to a theory known as predictive coding, whereby the brain optimizes perception by constantly trying to predict the sensory signals based on candidate hypotheses (syllables in this model). (2020-06-26)

Chronobiology: Researchers identify genes that tell plants when to flower
How do plants know when it is time to flower? Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have identified two genes that are key to this process. They were able to show that the ELF3 and GI genes control the internal clock of the plants that monitors the length of daylight and determine when it is the right time to flower. The findings could help to breed plants that are better adapted to their environments. (2020-06-22)

Disrupted circadian rhythms linked to later Parkinson's diagnoses
Older men who have a weak or irregular circadian rhythm guiding their daily cycles of rest and activity are more likely to later develop Parkinson's disease, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences who analyzed 11 years of data for nearly 3,000 independently living older men. (2020-06-15)

Our sleep during lockdown: Longer and more regular, but worse
A survey conducted at the University of Basel and the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel has investigated how sleep has changed during the Covid-19 lockdown. The 435 individuals surveyed -- most of whom were women -- reported sleeping longer while sleep quality deteriorated. The results of the study were published in the scientific journal Current Biology. (2020-06-12)

People who eat a late dinner may gain weight
Eating a late dinner may contribute to weight gain and high blood sugar, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-06-11)

From bacteria to you: The biological reactions that sustain our rhythms
Methylation and the circadian clock are both conserved mechanisms found in all organisms. Kyoto University researchers found that inhibiting methylation with a specific compound disrupts the circadian clock in most organisms except bacteria. The team transformed specific methylation genes from bacteria into animal cells to rescue said inhibition, opening potentially new treatments for methylation deficiencies. (2020-06-11)

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