Current Cirrhosis News and Events | Page 2

Current Cirrhosis News and Events, Cirrhosis News Articles.
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Ammonia levels do not aid management of hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients
Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a reversible complication of liver cirrhosis thought to be caused by ammonia and is typically treated with lactulose. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina conducted a cohort study that examined the correlation of ammonia levels with lactulose treatment. They found no correlation between ammonia level and dose of lactulose given. They concluded that ammonia levels are not helpful for clinicians in the management of HE in cirrhotic patients. (2019-11-19)

Regeneration mechanism discovered in mice could provide target for drugs to combat chronic liver disease
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a novel molecular mechanism that allows damaged adult liver cells to regenerate, paving the way for design of drugs to boost regeneration in conditions such as cirrhosis or other chronic liver diseases where regeneration is impaired. (2019-11-04)

Deaths from liver cancer have tripled in past 20 years in England
More people are being diagnosed with and dying from liver cancer in England than ever before, according to new research to be presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference. In 20 years, from 1997 to 2016, incidence and deaths from the most common form of the disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, have tripled and it is most common among the most deprived members of society. (2019-10-31)

New diagnostic method to determine liver cancer consistency
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have developed a new diagnostic technique which enables the grading of tumor consistency using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The researchers used an imaging technique known as tomoelastography to visualize the mechanical properties of liver tumors. Results from this research have been published in Cancer Research*. (2019-10-28)

Researchers identify potential therapy for liver disease in people living with HIV
Researchers have identified a novel therapeutic strategy to significantly improve liver disease in people living with HIV. (2019-10-11)

Study shows interactions between bacteria and parasites
A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has completed the first study of the effects of a simultaneous infection with blood flukes (schistosomes) and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori -- a fairly common occurrence in some parts of the world. They identified a complex interaction which resulted -- among other effects -- in a weakening of the adverse impact of the pathogens acting individually. (2019-09-18)

Abnormal gut bugs tied to worse cognitive performance in vets with PTSD and cirrhosis
A study involving military veterans with PTSD and cirrhosis of the liver points to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the intestines as a possible driver of poor cognitive performance -- and as a potential target for therapy. (2019-09-12)

Lab-on-a-chip may help identify new treatments for liver disease
Investigators have developed a 'lab on a chip' technology that can simulate different levels of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression. (2019-08-29)

Study proves hepatitis C drugs reduce liver-related deaths by nearly half
A new study from the UT Southwestern Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrates that antiviral drugs for hepatitis C reduce liver-related deaths by nearly 50% in patients with a history of liver cancer. (2019-08-09)

Liver transplants could be redundant with discovery of new liver cell
Researchers at King's College London have used single cell RNA sequencing to identify a type of cell that may be able to regenerate liver tissue, treating liver failure without the need for transplants. (2019-07-26)

How hepatitis B and delta viruses establish infection of liver cells
Princeton University researchers have developed a new, scalable cell culture system that allows for detailed investigation of how host cells respond to infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and delta virus (HDV). The paper describing their findings was published online on June 18, 2019 in the journal Hepatology. (2019-06-18)

Research deepens understanding of gut bacteria's connections to human health, disease
Researchers have made an important advance in understanding the roles that gut bacteria play in human health. (2019-05-30)

Translational research led by Singapore scientists uncovers new treatment for fatty liver disease
A new treatment approach that involves blocking a protein has, for the first time, shown promising results in the treatment of fatty liver disease, in a landmark translational research collaboration between Duke-NUS Medical School, National Heart Centre Singapore and biotech company Enleofen Bio. (2019-05-22)

Walking and strength training may decrease the risk of dying from liver disease
Physical activity, including walking and muscle-strengthening activities, were associated with significantly reduced risk of cirrhosis-related death, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019. Chronic liver disease is increasing, partly due to the obesity epidemic, and currently there are no guidelines for the optimal type of exercise for the prevention of cirrhosis-related mortality. (2019-05-19)

Diabetes patients at higher risk of deadly liver disease, finds study of 18 million people
Many patients with potentially deadly liver cirrhosis and liver cancer are being diagnosed at late advanced stages of disease, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow. (2019-05-19)

High rates of liver disease progression and mortality observed in patients with NAFLD/NASH
Two independent national studies have reported high rates of liver disease progression and mortality among patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH). (2019-04-10)

Autoimmune diseases of the liver may be triggered by exposure to an environmental factor
Investigators from a large population-based study conducted in northern England have suggested that exposure to a persistent, low-level environmental trigger may have played a role in the development of autoimmune diseases of the liver within that population. (2019-04-10)

New study identifies genetic variant that could help reduce need for liver transplants
A new study from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research has identified a genetic variant associated with liver fibrosis (scarring) in chronic hepatitis C patients. This finding is a step toward reducing the number of patients requiring liver transplants. (2019-04-02)

Movement toward a poop test for liver cirrhosis
In a study of people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and their twins and other close relatives, UC San Diego researchers were able to diagnose liver cirrhosis simply by analyzing a person's stool microbes. (2019-03-29)

WHO guidelines fail to detect half of chronic hepatitis B patients in Ethiopia needing treatment
Current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) fail to detect half of the patients in need of treatment in Ethiopia, report scientists in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier. They propose revision of the guidelines to consider local data from sub-Saharan Africa in order to help reach the WHO goal of eliminating viral hepatitis as a major public health threat by 2030. (2019-03-28)

Mayo Clinic researchers identify potential new therapy for liver diseases
Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers. (2019-03-22)

Hepatitis B vaccination in preadolescents lowered the disease incidence rate in Catalonia
Introducing hepatitis B vaccine in preadolescents meant a decline in the disease incidence rate by 52 percent according to a study in which the University of Barcelona took part. The study analyzed the efficiency and impact of the vaccination program set in Catalonia, Spain, 21 years ago. The results show that after introducing the program, the incidence rate in general population went from 2.5 per 100,000 people in 1991 to 1.2 per 100,000 people in 2014. (2019-03-13)

New hepatitis C cases down by almost 70 percent in HIV-positive men in London
New cases of hepatitis C amongst HIV-positive men in London have fallen by nearly 70 percent in recent years. The new analysis of data from three clinics in London found 256 men were diagnosed between 2013-2018. New infections peaked at 17 for every 1,000 people studied in 2015 and fell to six by 2018. (2019-03-06)

Towards a blood test for early-stage liver disease
One in four people in Western and Asian societies develop a build-up of fat in the liver as a result of an unhealthy diet. This disease -- non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) -- causes no symptoms initially but can develop into end-stage liver cirrhosis. A discovery, published today in Molecular Systems Biology, paves the way for a simple blood test to detect early stages of NAFLD, opening up the possibility of preventing the development of liver cirrhosis. (2019-03-01)

The Lancet: Direct-acting antivirals reduce risk of premature mortality and liver cancer for people with chronic hepatitis C
The first prospective, longitudinal study investigating treatment of chronic hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals finds that the treatment is associated with reduced risk of mortality and liver cancer, according to a study published in The Lancet. The research is the first to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals on the disease and suggests that they should be considered for all patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. (2019-02-11)

Connective tissue on the wrong road -- when organs start to scar
The increased deposition of connective tissue is a problem in chronic diseases of many organs. Up to 40 percent of all deaths in industrial nations are caused by the deposition of connective tissue with subsequent tissue scarring. In spite of this, there are very few effective treatments available. Scientists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now decrypted a molecular network that controls these processes and could in future provide a new way to treat organ scarring. (2019-02-05)

The Lancet: Major progress against hepatitis C by 2030 is possible, but will need vast improvements in screening, prevention and treatment
A comprehensive package of prevention, screening, and treatment interventions could avert 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis and liver cancer deaths globally by 2030 -- equal to an 80 percent reduction in incidence and a 60 percent reduction in deaths compared with 2015, according to the first study to model hepatitis C interventions globally published in The Lancet. (2019-01-28)

Publication of data for SYNB1020 a potential treatment for hyperammonemia
Synlogic, Inc., (Nasdaq: SYBX) a clinical stage company applying synthetic biology to beneficial microbes to develop novel, living medicines, today announced the publication in Science Translational Medicine of clinical data from its Phase 1 clinical study in healthy volunteers and supporting preclinical data from its investigational Synthetic Biotic candidate, SYNB1020. The data support the continued development of SYNB1020 which is currently being evaluated in a Phase 1b/2a clinical trial in patients with cirrhosis and elevated blood ammonia. (2019-01-16)

Liver disease could be picked up much sooner by nurse-led tests in GP surgeries
Research carried out by scientists at the University of Southampton has shown that simple tests in GP surgeries could potentially double the diagnosis rate of liver disease where patients are not displaying any symptoms. (2018-12-21)

Alcohol use may increase among Hispanic Americans as they become more 'Americanized'
Data from over 68,000 Hispanic Americans, including first-generation immigrants and native-born individuals, indicate that people in this group who are more 'Americanized' are more likely to be drinkers, consume alcohol at greater intensity, experience more negative consequences associated with alcohol use and affect women more than men. (2018-11-26)

Colder, darker climates increase alcohol consumption and liver disease
People living in colder regions with less sunlight consume more alcohol and experience more alcoholic liver disease. (2018-11-14)

Researchers identify risk factors of advanced liver disease in cystic fibrosis patients
Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) pediatric gastroenterologist, Michael Narkewicz, MD, recently shared results of the Prospective Study of Ultrasound to Predict Hepatic Cirrhosis in Cystic Fibrosis (PUSH), which sought to determine if liver ultrasounds could identify children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis who are at greater risk of developing advanced liver disease. (2018-11-12)

Breakthrough for treatment of fibrotic diseases
A drug combination has potential to halt a process responsible for large numbers of deaths. (2018-11-05)

Potential markers identified for early detection and prevention of liver cancer
A new study offers hope of early detection for hepatocellular carcinoma -- the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, claiming 700,000 lives each year. The results show a dramatic increase in expression of sugar-burning 'glycolytic' genes in precancerous cirrhotic livers, associated with a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. This could lead to a biomarker which identifies those at risk of malignancy, as well as targets for new treatments. (2018-10-31)

Interleukin IL-22, a new target to inhibit the progression of liver disease
Naglaa Shoukry, Ph. D., and her team have made a significant breakthrough in their research aiming to limit the progression of liver disease. They have characterized the mechanisms of action of type 3 inflammatory cytokines that are produced by the cells of the immune system, which result in a progression of hepatic scarring known as fibrosis. These research efforts have identified new potential targets to inhibit the progression of liver disease and prevent cancer. (2018-10-26)

Clues to the link between obesity and liver cancer-and identification of a new risk group
New research has found a previously overlooked group of obese people may be at risk of developing deadly liver cancer. Most obese individuals who develop liver cancer first develop non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and then the more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. This can lead to cirrhosis and liver failure. However, this research reveals pathways to the development of liver cancer in obese people that are not reliant on the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or cirrhosis. (2018-10-25)

Body clock link to steroids discovered
Scientists at The Universities of Manchester and Leeds have discovered that the time of day influences the way mice respond to steroids. Professor David Ray, from The University of Manchester, lead the research which found that out of 752 genes which regulate lungs in mice, 230 genes work only in the day and 197 only at night. (2018-09-04)

Gum disease treatment may improve symptoms in cirrhosis patients
Routine oral care to treat gum disease (periodontitis) may play a role in reducing inflammation and toxins in the blood (endotoxemia) and improving cognitive function in people with liver cirrhosis. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. (2018-08-29)

New target could prevent progression of liver damage to cancer
Problems like obesity and alcoholism appear to chronically trigger in the liver a receptor known to amplify inflammation in response to invaders like bacteria, scientists report. The relentless, increased activity of TREM-1 in turn accelerates injury and scarring of the liver, a first step toward cirrhosis and liver cancer, says Dr. Anatolij Horuzsko, reproductive immunologist in the Georgia Cancer Center and Department of Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. (2018-08-27)

Genetic variation may increase risk of liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B
A new study has shown that genetic variation may increase the risk of severe liver damage in Caucasians with chronic hepatitis B infection. (2018-07-26)

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