Current Civil War News and Events

Current Civil War News and Events, Civil War News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Controlling deflection in construction beams
In civil engineering, flexural beams are used to control the effect of vibrations that can cause cracks to appear in surfaces (concrete slabs) and beams. This is particularly important in buildings that require high tensile strength and where the use of machinery can cause a lot of vibrations that can disturb structural integrity. (2021-02-22)

Can bacteria make stronger cars, airplanes and armor?
Biological systems can harness their living cells for growth and regeneration, but engineering systems cannot. Until now.Researchers are harnessing living bacteria to create engineering materials that are strong, tolerant, and resilient. (2021-02-22)

Gulf war illness not caused by depleted uranium from munitions, study shows
Inhalation of depleted uranium from exploding munitions did not lead to Gulf War illness (GWI) in veterans deployed in the 1991 Persian Gulf War, a new study co-authored by a leading researcher of the disease at UT Southwestern suggests. The findings, published today in Scientific Reports, help eliminate a long-suspected cause of GWI that has attracted international concern for three decades. (2021-02-18)

Delayed medical treatment of high-impact injuries: A lesson from the Syrian civil war
Researchers report that patients injured in the facial bones by high-speed fire and operated on approximately 2-4 weeks after the injury suffered fewer post-operative complications compared to those wounded who underwent immediate surgical treatment. They hypothesize that this is due to a critical period of time before surgery, which facilitates healing and formation of new blood vessels in the area of the injury and, subsequently, an improvement in the blood and oxygen supply. (2021-02-16)

Patient education program with mental health component reduces cardiovascular disease risks
People who participated in an integrated mental and physical health patient education program maintained significant improvements on seven of nine health measures six months after the program's conclusion. Study by University of Illinois social work professor Tara M. Powell and Jordan's Royal Health Awareness Society. (2021-02-11)

The power of groupthink: Study shows why ideas spread in social networks
New research shows that large groups of people all tend to think alike, and also illustrates how easily people's opinions can be swayed by social media--even by artificial users known as bots. (2021-02-10)

The wars in Former Yugoslavia continue in the classroom
According to the Education Act, schools in the ethnically divided Bosnia and Herzegovina must teach students ''democratic ideals in a multicultural society.'' But according to new research from the University of Copenhagen, the opposite happens: Segregated schools perpetuate ethnic divisions between Croats, Serbs and Bosniaks, making reconciliation after the 1992-1995 wars extremely difficult. (2021-02-09)

Recycling face masks into roads to tackle COVID-generated waste
Researchers have developed a new road-making material that mixes shredded single-use face masks with processed building rubble. Their analysis shows making just 1km of a 2-lane road with the material would enable 3 million face masks to be recycled and kept out of landfill. (2021-02-02)

Nuclear war could trigger big El Niño and decrease seafood
A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment, shows that turning to the oceans for food if land-based farming fails after a nuclear war is unlikely to be a successful strategy - at least in the equatorial Pacific. (2021-01-25)

Abusive bosses 'fake nice' instead of 'make nice'
Rather than take steps to genuinely repair damage caused by their abusive behavior, such as offering sincere apologies, many of the bosses in this study were more concerned about repairing their social images. (2021-01-22)

Internet and freedom of speech, when metaphors give too much power
Since 1997, when the US supreme court metaphorically called the Internet the free market of ideas, attempts at regulation have been blocked by the 1st amendment. But with power concentrated in a few platforms, that metaphor is now misleading, says a study by Bocconi's Oreste Pollicino (2021-01-21)

A climate in crisis calls for investment in direct air capture, news research finds
There is a growing consensus among scientists as well as national and local governments representing hundreds of millions of people, that humanity faces a climate crisis that demands a crisis response. New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from the ambient air and sequester it safely underground. (2021-01-14)

Changes in political administration come with increased danger of international conflict
A new paper including faculty at Binghamton University suggests that when democratic publics vote out an administration, this change comes with an increase in the danger of undesirable conflict. (2021-01-13)

Free all non-violent criminals jailed on minor drug offences, say experts
Non-violent offenders serving time for drug use or possession should be freed immediately and their convictions erased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed The American Journal of Bioethics. (2021-01-07)

Community-based COVID-19 testing site highlight importance of understanding the virus'
Results from community-based COVID-19 testing site found that one in four kids tested positive, with minorities impacted at higher rate (2020-12-21)

How scientists are using declassified military photographs to analyse historical ecological change
Researchers are using?Cold?War spy satellite images to explore changes in the environment, including deforestation in Romania, marmot decline in Kazakhstan and ecological damage from bombs in Vietnam.? (2020-12-17)

An alternate savanna
When civil war broke out in Mozambique more than 40 years ago, it largely spelled doom for animals in Gorongosa National Park, a 1,500-square-mile reserve on the floor of the southern end of the Great African Rift Valley, in the heart of the country. As the decades-long fighting spilled over into the reserve, many of the creatures became casualties of the conflict. (2020-12-14)

Trench fever in urban people who are homeless
A disease common during the First World War, trench fever, has been found in some urban populations experiencing homelessness in Canada, and physicians should be aware of this potentially fatal disease, highlights a practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-12-07)

Wastewater testing for COVID-19
A new wastewater testing approach capable of better detecting viral infection patterns in communities could prove a crucial step toward an informed public health response to diseases like COVID-19. (2020-12-07)

Nine years on, the psychological effects of the Syrian war on school children in Damascus
Almost a decade of civil and military unrest has left Syrian children mentally scarred, angry and traumatised, according to new research. (2020-12-02)

Octogenarian snapper found in WA becomes oldest tropical reef fish by two decades
An 81-year-old midnight snapper caught off the coast of Western Australia has taken the title of the oldest tropical reef fish recorded anywhere in the world. The octogenarian fish was found at the Rowley Shoals -- about 300km west of Broome -- and was part of a study that has revised what we know about the longevity of tropical fish. (2020-12-01)

Earthquake scenario for large German city
What if there is a major earthquake near Cologne? This scenario is subject of the ''Risk Analysis in Civil Protection 2019'' report that was recently submitted to the German Bundestag. On the basis of extensive research, experts have listed in detail effects to be expected. What Germans usually only know from abroad results from modeling a strong earthquake near the megacity of Cologne: ground shaking, damaged and destroyed houses, blocked roads, many injured and dead. (2020-11-30)

Study examines remission of obesity-related complications in teens after bariatric surgery
Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have shown that, with the exception of cholesterol and triglyceride levels, remission of obesity-related complications in teens following bariatric surgery was not dependent on major sustained weight loss. Rather, a majority of adolescents benefited from such remission whether or not they lost a significant amount of weight. (2020-11-24)

Study: Countering hate on social media
The rise of online hate speech is a disturbing, growing trend in countries around the world, with serious psychological consequences and the potential to impact, and even contribute to, real-world violence. A new paper offers a framework for studying the dynamics of online hate and counter speech, and offers the first large-scale classification of millions of instances such interactions on Twitter. (2020-11-20)

States unfairly burdening incarcerated people with 'pay-to-stay' fees
Pay-to-stay, the practice of charging people to pay for their own jail or prison confinement, is being enforced unfairly by using criminal, civil and administrative law, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick led study. (2020-11-20)

Analysis of the relations between Spanish civil society organizations and science
Researchers at UPF have analysed the relationship between civil society organizations and the Spanish science and technology system. The study has been published in Public Understanding of Science and conducted by Carolina Llorente and Gema Revuelta, at the Science, Communication and Society Studies Centre (CCS-UPF), and Mar Carrió, of the Health Sciences Educational Research Group (GRECS). (2020-11-19)

NO DRINKING! NO FIGHTING! The laws of early Edo Japan to keep the peace
An early Edo period document stipulating the Hosokawa clan code of conduct for vassals dispatched on a national project to rebuild Sunpu Castle has been discovered by Kumamoto University researchers. The thirteen articles from the head of the Hosokawa clan, Tadaoki Hosokawa, delegate full authority to the vassals to lead construction and prevent conflicts with other clans. It is the second code of conduct document related to the Sunpu Castle reconstruction effort to be discovered. (2020-11-18)

A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention. (2020-11-17)

Single institution study finds high rates of cardiac complications in MIS-C
During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers at Children's National Hospital discovered that as many as one half of children diagnosed with multisystem inflammatory disease in children (MIS-C) at the hospital developed cardiac complications including coronary artery abnormalities, even when diagnosed and treated promptly. (2020-11-13)

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have demonstrated that adolescents who valued their interests and curiosity had higher wellbeing in old age from a 60-year-old cohort in the UK. We additionally found that adolescents with low self-control who valued money and steady jobs had significantly lower wellbeing in old age. (2020-11-11)

Global fisheries could alleviate a global food emergency in extreme situations
A new international study argues that, if managed sustainably in advance, global fisheries could alleviate food shortages even after a nuclear war. (2020-11-09)

Water-energy nanogrid provides solution for rural communities lacking basic amenities
Researchers at Texas A&M University have come up with an economical, green solution that can help underprivileged communities with their water and electricity needs. (2020-11-04)

How to fix the movement for fossil fuel divestment
Bankers and environmentalists alike are increasingly calling for capital markets to play a bigger role in the war on carbon. In the absence of a meaningful global price on carbon, however, capital continues to flow freely toward fossil fuels and other carbon-intensive industries. The movement for fossil fuel divestment has been trying since 2012 to reverse this trend. (2020-11-03)

Asteroid's scars tell stories of its past
Asteroid Bennu, which was just sampled by NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, only recently migrated into Earth's neighborhood, according to a detailed analysis of impact marks on boulders on its surface. The report provides a new benchmark for understanding the evolution of asteroids and offers insights into space debris hazardous to spacecraft. (2020-10-30)

Advanced facade material for urban heat island mitigation
A joint research team of Toyohashi University of Technology and Osaka City University has proposed two analytical models to evaluate the reflection directional characteristics of retro-reflective (RR) materials applied to building envelopes for urban heat island (UHI) mitigation, based on the measured data of optical experiments. The predication result of the anisotropic body of rotation of the normal distribution function (AND) model is more accurate than that of the original analytical model. (2020-10-29)

Artificial intelligence dives into thousands of WW2 photographs
In a new international cross disciplinary study, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark and Tampere University, Finland have used artificial intelligence to analyse large amounts of historical photos from WW2. Among other things, the study shows that artificial intelligence can distinguish people and objects in a variety of scenes and even recognise the identity of the photographers based on the content of photos taken by them. (2020-10-28)

A drop in temperature
In the nearly two centuries since German physician Carl Wunderlich established 98.6°F as the standard ''normal'' body temperature, it has been used by parents and doctors alike as the measure by which fevers -- and often the severity of illness -- have been assessed. (2020-10-28)

Bridges with limb-inspired architecture can withstand earthquakes, cut repair costs
Structural damage to any of the nation's ailing bridges can come with a hefty price of billions of dollars in repairs. New bridge designs promise more damage-resistant structures and, consequently, lower restoration costs. But if these designs haven't been implemented in the real world, predicting how they can be damaged and what repair strategies should be implemented remain unresolved. (2020-10-26)

Researcher found female candidates are more likely to discuss the economy than males
In a new study published in Politics & Policy, Deserai Crow, PhD, associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver in the School of Public Affairs, found significant differences in discussion topics between both party affiliation and gender. Narratives from both Republican and Democratic candidates in 48 U.S. House campaigns from the 2018 midterm election were analyzed in this study. (2020-10-26)

A new technique predicts how earthquakes would affect a city's hospitals
An international research team led by the Stanford Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering has developed a methodology to help disaster preparedness officials in large cities make contingency plans on a region-wide basis to make sure that emergency responders can get patients to the hospital facilities that are likeliest to remain in commission after a quake. (2020-10-22)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.