Current Cleft Palate News and Events

Current Cleft Palate News and Events, Cleft Palate News Articles.
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Avian insights into human ciliopathies
Ciliopathies are genetic disorders caused by defects in the structure and function of cilia, and present a wide range of clinical symptoms, leading to conditions such as micrognathia (an underdeveloped lower jaw that can impair feeding and breathing). Researchers have now discovered that ciliopathic micrognathia in an animal model results from abnormal skeletal differentiation and remodelling. (2021-02-15)

Fine tuning first-responder immune cells may reduce TBI damage
Immediately after a traumatic brain injury and as long as one year later, there are increased levels of immune cells called ILCs in the brain promoting inflammation, which can worsen brain damage, scientists report. They also report for the first time that the cell energy sensor AMPK is a brake that can stop what becomes a chronic state of destructive inflammation driven by these ILCs, or innate lymphoid cells. (2021-01-25)

Clinical criteria for diagnosing autism inadequate for people with genetic conditions
People with certain genetic conditions are likely to have significant symptoms of autism, even if they do not meet all diagnostic criteria, a study concludes. (2021-01-01)

Researchers illuminate neurotransmitter transport using X-ray crystallography and molecular simulations
Scientists from the MIPT Research Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases have joined forces with their colleagues from Jülich Research Center, Germany, and uncovered how sodium ions drive glutamate transport in the central nervous system. Glutamate is the most important excitatory neurotransmitter and is actively removed from the synaptic cleft between neurons by specialized transport proteins called excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). (2020-12-21)

Genetics of human face begin to reveal underlying profile
The genetics behind the shape of the human face are difficult to decipher, but now an international team of researchers has connected specific genetic signals with specific areas of the face. They not only can see the signals of normal facial features in the genome, but also hope their work can shed light on craniofacial malformations such as cleft lip and palate. (2020-12-07)

Extremely rare parasitic crustacean discovered in museum shark collection
Scientists have discovered an extremely rare species of cymothoid from the mouth of a museum specimen of a deep-sea shark caught from the East China Sea, suggesting its wide distribution around the globe. (2020-11-17)

Chili-shaped device could reveal just how hot that pepper is
Some people love spicy food -- the hotter, the better. Others go out of their way to avoid the palate-singeing burn of capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick. Now, researchers have developed a portable device (whimsically shaped like a chili pepper) that can reveal how much capsaicin a pepper contains, before biting into it. They report their results in ACS Applied Nano Materials. (2020-10-21)

Nerve cells let others "listen in"
How many ''listeners'' a nerve cell has in the brain is strictly regulated. This is shown by an international study led by the University College London and the universities of Bonn, Bordeaux and Milton Keynes (England). In the environment of learning neurons, certain processes are set in motion that make signal transmission less exclusive. The results have now been published in the journal Neuron. (2020-09-25)

Relief for people who struggle with CPAP masks
A trial of a simple yet effective surgery has led Australian experts to promote it as an option to specialists around the world for managing difficult obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) cases. After rigorous evaluation of the surgery, excellent outcomes were shown in sleep apnea patients who had been unable to use continuous positive pressure airway (CPAP) treatment, with patients achieved relief from snoring and disrupted sleep and experienced improved general health. according to a new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (2020-09-04)

For children with cleft lip and palate, no major psychological impact of repeated surgeries
Children born with cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) commonly undergo multiple surgical procedures between infancy and adolescence. By the time they are teens, patients with CLP with more total surgeries do not have increased psychosocial problems. (2020-06-25)

Three research groups, two kinds of electronic properties, one material
An outstanding collaboration combines materials science, experimental and theoretical physics. The work paves the way to new designed materials that combine in them multiple electrical functionalities. (2020-06-10)

Small risk of muscle and bone problems in babies of mothers who took common thrush treatment
Pregnant women who take the thrush treatment fluconazole orally appear to have a higher risk of giving birth to a baby with muscle and bone malformations, suggests research published by The BMJ today. (2020-05-20)

Children born with a cleft lip unlikely to be genetically inclined to do poorly at school
New research has found that children born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate, are not likely to be genetically predisposed to do less well at school than their peers. The study by the Cleft Collective research team at the University of Bristol is published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology. (2020-05-06)

Scientists discover new features of molecular elevator
Biophysicists have visualized a nearly complete transport cycle of the mammalian glutamate transporter homologue from archaea. They confirmed that the transport mechanism resembles that of an elevator: A 'door' opens, ions and substrate molecules come in, the door closes, and they travel through the membrane. (2020-04-19)

Skin and non-adhesive cells found to play pivotal role in the formation of fin
Human fingers are sculpted from a primitive pad-like structure during embryonic development. Sometimes, this process goes awry and babies are born with fused fingers or toes. A new study from the University of California, Irvine reveals new factors involved in the congenital malformation called syndactyly. (2020-02-27)

Transport protein efficiently uses three independent lifts to shuttle the goods
The structure of a transport complex used by bacteria to import aspartate has been mapped in unique detail by University of Groningen scientists. The proteins were imaged using cryo-electron microscopy. The results reveal that the transporter works very efficiently. This is especially interesting as a similar transporter is vital for signal transduction between human brain cells. The study results were published in Nature Communications on 21 February. (2020-02-24)

New details on how a viral protein puts the brakes on virus replication
Researchers used computational chemistry, biochemistry and virology to uncover new information on how viruses such as West Nile, dengue and Zika replicate. (2020-02-07)

Vanderbilt-led team discovers new genetic disease and defines underlying mechanism
An international research team has discovered a new genetic syndrome caused by mutation of a single gene and named it CATIFA, an acronym for its core symptoms: cleft palate, cataracts, tooth abnormality, intellectual disability, facial dysmorphism and ADHD. The investigators report in Nature Medicine that the new disease is caused by a defect in collagen secretion. (2020-01-13)

Uncontrolled asthma attacks during pregnancy increase health risks for mothers and babies
Women with asthma who suffer severe symptoms while they are pregnant face higher risks of health problems both for themselves and their babies compared to women with well-controlled asthma, according to research published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2019-11-26)

Not so selfish after all--Key role of transposable elements in mammalian evolution
A scientist at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has revealed a key role for 'selfish' transposable elements in the evolution of the mammary gland, a defining feature of all mammals. (2019-11-20)

Uncovering the pathway to wine's acidity
University of Adelaide wine researchers say their latest discovery may one day lead to winemakers being able to manipulate the acidity of wines without the costly addition of tartaric acid. (2019-11-18)

AI could help diagnose dogs suffering from chronic pain and Chiari-like malformation
A new artificial intelligence (AI) technique developed by the University of Surrey could eventually help veterinarians quickly identify Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) dogs with a chronic disease that causes crippling pain. The same technique identified unique biomarkers which inspired further research into the facial changes in dogs affected by Chiari-like malformation (CM). (2019-11-07)

Structural and biochemical studies clarify the methylation mechanism of anticodon in tRNA
Groups in Ehime University, Japan and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan have solved the crystal structure of the eukaryotic Trm7-TRm734 complex, which methylates the ribose at the first position of anticodon in tRNA. They have clarified the tRNA recognition mechanism of this complex and the functions of its subunits based on the crystal structure. This study was published in Nucleic Acids Research on Oct. 5, 2019. (2019-11-06)

Massive fangs and a death crush: How a 370 million year old tetrapod hunted and killed
The habits of a needle-toothed tetrapod which lived more than 370 million years ago have filled in a piece of the evolutionary puzzle after an international team of palaeontologists pieced together fossilised skeletons and found unusual characteristics such as a crocodile-like skull with high positioned eyes would have been used to 'keep an eye' on prey before it used its slender needle-like teeth and elastic jaw to snatch its kill and crush it to death. (2019-10-24)

Common chemical linked to rare birth defect in mice
New research reports that PBO interferes with the critical signaling pathway dubbed by scientists as sonic hedgehog, resulting in stunted forebrain development and signature facial abnormalities. (2019-10-23)

Research identifies earlier origin of neural crest cells
Neural crest cells have been thought to originate in the ectoderm, the outermost of the three germ layers formed in the earliest stages of embryonic development. But their capacity to form derivatives like bone and tooth-forming cells defies fundamental concepts in developmental and stem cell biology. A research team led by a UC Riverside biomedical scientist has found a solution to this mystery by demonstrating an earlier origin of the neural crest in chick embryos. (2019-10-22)

USC researchers hone in on the elusive receptor for sour taste
USC scientists and colleagues identify sour taste receptor. (2019-09-19)

Speech impairment in five-year-old international adoptees with cleft palate
In a group of internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate, speech at age five is impaired compared to a corresponding group of children born in Sweden, a study shows. The adopted children also need more extensive surgery, which may be due to their surgical interventions taking place later in life. (2019-09-06)

Psychosensory electronic skin technology for future AI and humanoid development
Professor Jae Eun Jang's team developed electronic skin technology for robots or electronic devices to feel pain through sense of touch. Expected to be applied in humanoid that needs 5 human senses and patients wearing prosthetic hands. (2019-08-29)

Variation in the shape of speech organs influences language evolution
Why do speech sounds vary across languages? Does the shape of our speech organs play a role? In a computer modelling study reported in Nature Human Behaviour, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics show that variation in the hard palate -- the roof of the mouth -- leads to subtle differences in pronunciation. As newly learned vowels were passed on to next generations, these differences were amplified, showing that our anatomy can influence language evolution. (2019-08-19)

Direct toxic action of beta-amyloid identified
Hyperactive neurons in specific areas of the brain are believed to be an early perturbation in Alzheimer's disease. For the first time, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to explain the reasons and mechanisms underlying this early and therefore important neuronal dysfunction. They found that the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate persists for too long near active neurons. This causes a pathological overstimulation of those neurons -- most likely contributing critically to impaired learning and memory loss in Alzheimer's patients. (2019-08-09)

Sense of smell, pollution and neurological disease connection explored
A consensus is building that air pollution can cause neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but how fine, sooty particles cause problems in the brain is still an unanswered question. Now a team of Penn State researchers, using mice, have found a possible way, but more research is still needed. (2019-07-01)

Posture impacts how you perceive your food
Standing just for a few minutes while eating can mute taste buds, impacting taste evaluation, temperature perception and overall consumption volume. (2019-06-06)

A treasure map to understanding the epigenetic causes of disease
Researchers have identified special regions of the genome where a blood sample can be used to infer epigenetic regulation throughout the body, allowing scientists to test for epigenetic causes of disease. (2019-06-02)

Older fathers put health of partners, unborn children at risk, Rutgers study finds
Men who delay starting a family have a ticking 'biological clock' -- just like women -- that may affect the health of their partners and children, according to Rutgers researchers. (2019-05-12)

Snoring causes injuries and prevention of healing in the upper airways
The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea. These findings are reported by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden. (2019-05-02)

The mystery behind cleft palate and lips: Study shines a light on genetic factors
Researchers found more than 100 new genes that could lead to the development of cleft lip and palates. The team discovered that genetic variants near these genes are in regions of the genome called enhancers, which regulate expression of genes to maintain proper cell identity. (2019-05-01)

Fitting a right hand in a left-handed mitten
Many biomolecules come in two versions that are each other's mirror image, like a left and a right hand. Cells generally use the left-hand version of amino acids to produce proteins, and uptake mechanisms were thought to share this preference. University of Groningen scientists have now shown that a prokaryotic transport protein can transport both versions of the amino acid aspartate with equal efficiency. (2019-04-25)

Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea. (2019-04-04)

Bath scientists develop a mouse model for rare brain disease Joubert syndrome
A new mouse model for Joubert syndrome has been developed by University of Bath scientists, who hope it will accelerate research to understand how the disease develops as well as help develop and evaluate therapeutic approaches. (2019-04-02)

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