Current Climate Change News and Events

Current Climate Change News and Events, Climate Change News Articles.
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Satellite images confirm uneven impact of climate change
University of Copenhagen researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet's driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades. They have identified a troubling trend: Too little vegetation is sprouting up from rainwater in developing nations, whereas things are headed in the opposite direction in wealthier ones. As a result, the future could see food shortages and growing numbers of climate refugees. (2020-11-26)

Irreversible hotter and drier climate over inner East Asia
Researchers warn that heatwaves and concurrent droughts of Mongolia's semi-arid plateau have increased significantly during the past two decades, with troubling implications for the future. The change also has ramifications for atmospheric conditions across the Northern Hemisphere. (2020-11-26)

Tree rings capture an abrupt irreversible shift in east Asia's climate
The abrupt shift to hotter and drier conditions over inner East Asia is unprecedented and may herald an irreversible shift to a new climate regime for the region, according to a new study. (2020-11-26)

In temperate trees, climate-driven increase in carbon capture causes autumn leaves to fall sooner
For decades, scientists have expected that the shedding of leaves from temperate trees will get later and later under ongoing climate change. (2020-11-26)

Air-sea coupling improves the simulation of the western North Pacific summer monsoon in the WRF4 model at a synoptic scale resolving resolution
Air-sea coupling improves the simulation of the western North Pacific summer monsoon in the WRF4 model at a synoptic scale resolving resolution (2020-11-25)

Ice sheets on the move: how north and south poles connect
Over the past 40,000 years, ice sheets thousands of kilometres apart have influenced one another through sea level changes, according to research published today in Nature. New modelling of ice sheet changes during the most recent glacial cycle by a McGill-led team demonstrates, for the first time, that during this period, changes in the Antarctic ice sheet were driven by the melting ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. (2020-11-25)

Evidence of the interconnectedness of global climate
The analysis, published in Nature, shows for the first time that changes in the Antarctic ice sheet were caused by the melting of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. The influence was driven by sea-level changes caused by the melting ice in the north during the past 40,000 years. (2020-11-25)

Effect of climate change on infectious diseases unknown to half of the population
Although it is a widely known scientific fact that infectious diseases emerge and re-emerge due to climate change, a study which included the involvement of the UAB published in PlosOne reveals that 48.9% of the population surveyed are not aware of this relation. (2020-11-25)

The keys to the squirrel's evolutionary success in the face of climate change have been identified
Squirrels form a diverse family of rodents. Nearly 300 species have been described, and they occur in every land environment on the planet, from tropical forests to hot and cold deserts. But why are there so many species? A study led by researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid and the Institute of Geosciences (UCM-CSIC) has examined the characteristics of squirrel species that contribute to their evolutionary success in the face of global climate change. (2020-11-25)

Restoration of degraded grasslands can benefit climate change mitigation and key ecosystem services
New research has demonstrated how, in contrast to encroachment by the invasive alien tree species Prosopis julifora (known as `Mathenge` -in Kenya or `Promi` in Baringo), restoration of grasslands in tropical semi-arid regions can both mitigate the impacts of climate change and restore key benefits usually provided by healthy grasslands for pastoralists and agro-pastoralist communities. (2020-11-24)

Strengthening the climate change scenario framework
Over the past decade, the climate change research community developed a scenario framework that combines alternative futures of climate and society to facilitate integrated research and consistent assessment to inform policy. An international team of researchers assessed how well this framework is working and what challenges it faces. (2020-11-24)

Siberian primrose has not had time to adapt to climate change
Global warming already affects Siberian primrose, a plant species that is threatened in Finland and Norway. According to a recently completed study, individuals of Siberian primrose originating in the Finnish coast on the Bothnian Bay currently fare better in northern Norway than in their home area. The results indicate that the species may not be able to adapt to quickly progressing climate change, which could potentially lead to its extinction. (2020-11-23)

Climate change presents new challenges for the drinking water supply
Rising temperatures in Germany's largest drinking water reservoir present new challenges for the drinking water supply. According to a group of UFZ researchers, the impacts of this increase can be alleviated by mitigating climate change and applying new management strategies. (2020-11-23)

Scientists organize to tackle crisis of coral bleaching
An international consortium of scientists has created the first-ever common framework for increasing comparability of research findings on coral bleaching. (2020-11-23)

Global warming likely to increase disease risk for animals worldwide
Changes in climate can increase infectious disease risk in animals, researchers found -- with the possibility that these diseases could spread to humans, they warn. (2020-11-23)

Nature is widely adapted to current climate -- making it harder to adjust to a new one
To do the right thing at the right time, organisms need to glean cues from their environment. With ongoing climate change, the timing of these cues, like the accumulation of warm days, is rapidly shifting. Now a network of researchers working on an unprecedentedly large dataset of seasonal events has shown that the timing of species' activity fail to keep up with their cues, and that how quickly activity shifts reflects past evolution. (2020-11-23)

A comprehensive look at the effects of climate change on Mount Everest
Between April and June of 2019, 10 research teams composed of 34 international and Nepali scientists journeyed toward the summit of Mount Everest as part of the 2019 National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition. Early results from this expedition, publishing November 20 in the journal One Earth, look at the impacts of climate change and human activity on Mount Everest. (2020-11-20)

Some Amazon rainforest regions more resistant to climate change than previously thought
Is the Amazon rainforest as sensitive to water stress as what the current models have been showing? Columbia Engineering researchers found that the models have been largely over-estimating water stress in tropical forests. While models show that increases in air dryness greatly diminish photosynthesis rates in certain regions of the Amazon rainforest, observational data results show the opposite: in certain very wet regions, the forests instead even increase photosynthesis rates in response to drier air. (2020-11-20)

A long distance connection: polar climate affects trade wind strength in tropics
The impact of sea surface temperature variations in the tropical Pacific on global climate has long been recognized. For instance, the episodic warming of the tropical Pacific during El NiƱo events causes melt of sea ice in far-reaching parts of the Southern Ocean via its effect on the global atmospheric circulation. A new study, published this week in the journal Science Advances by an international team, demonstrates that the opposite pathway exists as well. (2020-11-20)

Synthesis study demonstrates phytoplankton can bloom below Arctic sea ice
Researchers used historical scientific studies, along with contemporary observations employing autonomous floats and robotic vehicles, to demonstrate that phytoplankton blooms occur under Arctic Ocean sea ice. Previously, scientists had assumed that was impossible due to low-light conditions, particularly when ice cover was thicker before climate change. The synthesis of more than half a century of research on under-ice blooms suggests that modern computer models underestimate the contribution of microscopic algae to the Arctic carbon cycle. (2020-11-19)

Climate warming increases infectious disease risk in cooler-climate species
Accelerated climate warming may increase the risk for infectious disease outbreaks in many species adapted to mild and cooler climates, whereas species from warmer climates could experience reductions in disease risk, reports a new study. (2020-11-19)

Climate change and 'atmospheric thirst' to increase fire danger and drought in NV and CA
Climate change and a ''thirsty atmosphere'' will bring more extreme wildfire danger and multi-year droughts to Nevada and California by the end of this century, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the University of California, Merced. (2020-11-19)

How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats. (2020-11-18)

Geoscientists discover Ancestral Puebloans survived from ice melt in New Mexico lava tubes
New study explains how Ancestral Puebloans survived devastating droughts by traveling deep into the caves of New Mexico to melt ancient ice as a water resource. (2020-11-18)

Using materials efficiently can substantially cut greenhouse gas emissions
Emissions from the production of materials like metals, minerals, woods and plastics more than doubled in 1995 - 2015, accounting for almost one-quarter of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Material efficiency needs to play a larger role in climate planning, a new report says. (2020-11-18)

Volcanic eruptions have more effect in summer
Modeling shows that volcanic eruptions can cause changes in global climate, if the timing is right. (2020-11-18)

Research on environmental history: 330-year-old poplar tree tells of its life
Similar to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, i.e. gene modifications that do not occur on the primary DNA sequence, sometimes arise accidentally in plants and can be transmitted across generations. Using trees as a model, researchers have now shown for the first time that these so-called epimutations accumulate continuously throughout plant development, and that they can be employed as a molecular clock to estimate the age of a tree. (2020-11-18)

Teton range glacial ice may have persisted in a dormant state during early Holocene warming
A continuous 10,000-year record of alpine glacier fluctuations in Wyoming's Teton Range suggests that some glacial ice in the western US persisted in a reduced, essentially dormant state during periods of early Holocene warming. The findings challenge the paradigm that all Rocky Mountain glaciers completely disappeared during these warm, dry conditions, instead. (2020-11-18)

Reducing aerosol pollution without cutting carbon dioxide could make the planet hotter
Humans must reduce carbon dioxide and aerosol pollution simultaneously to avoid weakening the ocean's ability to keep the planet cool, new UC Riverside research shows. (2020-11-17)

Study improves ability to predict how whales travel through their ocean habitat
Scientists at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life recently published a study that could help researchers learn where protections are needed the most for bowhead whales. (2020-11-17)

Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate 'live fast and die young', new research shows. (2020-11-17)

Report: In retrospect, the burning of wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A new report from the University of Copenhagen shows that the burning of wood is significantly more climate friendly than coal and slightly more climate friendly than natural gas over the long run. For the first time, researchers quantified what the conversion of 10 Danish cogeneration plants from coal or natural gas to biomass has meant for their greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-11-17)

NASA model reveals how much COVID-related pollution levels deviated from the norm
Using computer models to generate a COVID-free 2020 for comparison, NASA researchers found that since February, pandemic restrictions have reduced global nitrogen dioxide concentrations by nearly 20%. (2020-11-17)

Farms, tables and vast impacts between and beyond
New sustainability science tools show places that have no major stake in the plant-water-eat game end up paying an environmental price. (2020-11-17)

When temperatures rise, dog ticks more likely to choose humans over canines
A variety of ticks that carry the bacteria causing the deadly disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) are more than twice as likely to shift their feeding preference from dogs to humans when temperatures rise, a sign that climate change could expand and intensify human disease risks, according to a new study presented today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). (2020-11-16)

A sweeping climate model of the Red Sea
An all-inclusive climate model for the entire Red Sea region is supporting Saudi Arabia's plans for a sustainable future. (2020-11-16)

Study reconstructs ancient storms to help predict changes in tropical cyclone hotspot
. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) published in Nature Geoscience reveals that tropical cyclones were actually more frequent in the southern Marshall Islands during the Little Ice Age, when temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere were cooler than they are today. This means that changes in atmospheric circulation, driven by differential ocean warming, heavily influence the location and intensity of tropical cyclones. (2020-11-16)

Recent climate extremes have driven unprecedented changes in the deep ocean
New measurements reveal a surprising increase in the amount of dense water sinking near Antarctica, following 50 years of decline. (2020-11-16)

Implementing carbon pricing during the pandemic could help countries recover greener, smarter
As economies ''build back better,'' it may be an opportune time to introduce carbon pricing to tackle climate change, according to new Princeton University research. (2020-11-16)

Media, NGO framing of climate change affects how people think about issue: studies
In a pair of studies, Hong Tien Vu of the University of Kansas found that the way media organizations and global climate change NGOs frame their messages on the topic does in fact influence how people look at the issue, which in turn affects what action, if any, is taken to fight the problem. (2020-11-16)

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