Current Climate Change News and Events | Page 2

Current Climate Change News and Events, Climate Change News Articles.
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Resilience to climate change?
A recent study examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world around us, and the way that world is adapting in response. (2021-01-13)

Smithsonian scientists reduce uncertainty in forest carbon storage calculations
Helene Muller-Landau, staff scientist was invited to write an authoritative review about carbon storage in forests. Her team combed through existing studies and came up with some novel conclusions of their own. (2021-01-13)

600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans. (2021-01-13)

Future too warm for baby sharks
As climate change causes the world's oceans to warm, baby sharks are born smaller, exhausted, undernourished and into environments that are already difficult for them to survive in. (2021-01-12)

Climate change reduces the abundance and diversity of wild bees, study finds
Wild bees are more affected by climate change than by disturbances to their habitats, according to a team of researchers led by Penn State. The findings suggest that addressing land-use issues alone will not be sufficient to protecting these important pollinators. (2021-01-12)

Study finds future too warm for baby sharks
A new study conducted at the New England Aquarium finds that as climate change causes the ocean to warm, baby sharks are born smaller, exhausted, undernourished, and into environments that are already difficult for them to survive in. (2021-01-12)

A bucket of water can reveal climate change impacts on marine life in the Arctic
We know very little about marine life in the Arctic. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, are trying to change that. They have shown that a simple water sample makes it possible to monitor the presence, migration patterns and genetic diversity of bowhead whales in an otherwise hard-to-reach area. The method can be used to understand how climate changes and human activities impact life in the oceans. (2021-01-12)

Researchers find wildfire smoke is more cooling on climate than computer models assume
Many of the most advanced climate models simulate smoke that is darker, or more light absorbing, than what researchers see in observations. (2021-01-12)

Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County have developed an artificial intelligence technique to quickly analyze newly collected data based on Arctic ice and snow thickness. Researchers previously analyzed these data manually; this AI will assist them by automating how they detect and analyze patterns in the thickness of the ice. Climate change necessitates a rapid understanding of new developments in the Arctic ice, and this tool provides a faster solution. (2021-01-12)

Impacts of climate change on our water and energy systems: it's complicated
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), UC Berkeley, and UC Santa Barbara have developed a science-based analytic framework to evaluate the complex connections between water and energy, and options for adaptations in response to an evolving climate. (2021-01-11)

Asian water towers on tighter budget despite a warmer and wetter climate
Asian Water Towers will have to struggle to quench the thirst of downstream communities despite more river runoff brought on by a warmer climate, according to a recent study led by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2021-01-11)

New climate change study: Number of people suffering extreme droughts will double
Michigan State University is leading a global research effort to offer the first worldwide view of how climate change could affect water availability and drought severity in the decades to come. By the late 21st century, global land area and population facing extreme droughts could more than double -- increasing from 3% during 1976-2005 to 7%-8%, according to Yadu Pokhrel, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering in MSU's College of Engineering, and lead author of the research published in Nature Climate Change. (2021-01-11)

UVA-led team expands power grid planning to improve system resilience
Researchers' paper in Nature Energy demonstrates that modernizing power grids and using renewable energy will be cheaper than repairing hurricane damage. (2021-01-11)

Positive 'tipping points' offer hope for climate
Positive 'tipping points' could spark cascading changes that accelerate action on climate change, experts say. (2021-01-10)

Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs. (2021-01-07)

Power, water and climate
As the planet continues to warm, the twin challenges of diminishing water supply and growing energy demand will intensify. But water and energy are inextricably linked. For instance, nearly a fifth of California's energy goes toward water-related activities, while more than a tenth of the state's electricity comes from hydropower. As society tries to adapt to one challenge, it needs to ensure it doesn't worsen the other. (2021-01-07)

Will global warming bring a change in the winds? Dust from the deep sea provides a clue
In a new paper published in Nature, climate researchers from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory describe a new method of tracking the ancient history of the westerly winds--a proxy for what we may experience in a future warming world. (2021-01-06)

It's getting hot in here: Warming world will fry power plant production in coming years
During the year's hottest months, many people rely on electricity-generated cooling systems to remain comfortable. But the power plants that keep air conditioners pushing out cold air could soon be in a vicious cycle in a warming world-not able to keep up with growing demands on hotter days and driving up greenhouse gas emissions to dangerous levels. (2021-01-06)

Hawai'i drought during El Niño winter? Not always, according to new research
El Niño events have long been perceived as a driver for low rainfall in the winter and spring in Hawai'i, creating a six-month wet-season drought. However, a recent study by researchers in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed the connection between Hawai'i winter rainfall and El Niño is not as straightforward as previously thought. (2021-01-06)

Uncovering how grasslands changed our climate
Grasslands are managed worldwide to support livestock production, while remaining natural or semi-natural ones provide critical services that contribute to the wellbeing of both people and the planet. Human activities are however causing grasslands to become a source of greenhouse gas emissions rather than a carbon sink. A new study uncovered how grasslands used by humans have changed our climate over the last centuries. (2021-01-05)

Rare footage captured of jaguar killing ocelot at waterhole
In what may be a sign of climate-change-induced conflict, researchers have captured rare photographic evidence of a jaguar killing another predatory wild cat at an isolated waterhole in Guatemala. (2021-01-05)

Novel method identifies areas most suitable for conservation of black lion tamarin
The researchers used modeling to show which areas are suitable in terms of forest cover and climate for occupation by the endangered species, which is endemic to the state of São Paulo. Their study is a contribution to translocation initiatives that move groups of these animals to areas from which the species has disappeared. (2021-01-05)

Drought of the century in the Middle Ages -- with parallels to climate change today?
The transition from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age was apparently accompanied by severe droughts between 1302 and 1307 in Europe. In the journal Climate of the Past, researchers from the Leibniz Institutes for the History and Culture of Eastern Europe (GWZO) and Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) write that the 1302-07 weather patterns display similarities to the 2018 weather anomaly, in which continental Europe experienced exceptional heat and drought. (2021-01-05)

Climate change caused mangrove collapse in Oman
Most of the mangrove forests on the coasts of Oman disappeared about 6,000 years ago. Until now, the reason for this was not entirely clear. A current study now sheds light on this: It indicates that the collapse of coastal ecosystems was caused by climatic changes. The results are published in the journal Quaternary Research. (2021-01-05)

Dungeness crab fishing industry response to climate shock
Fishermen contend with regulations, natural disasters, and the ups and downs of the stocks they fish, along with many other changes. As a result, fishing communities are quite resilient. That is, they can withstand, recover from, and adapt to change. (2021-01-05)

Pollutants rapidly changing the waters near Ieodo Island
Professor Kitack Lee's research team identifies the cause of ocean fertilization in northeast Asian waters. (2021-01-04)

Subscriptions to satellite alerts linked to decreased deforestation in Africa
Deforestation dropped by 18 percent in two years in African countries where organizations subscribed to receive warnings from a new service using satellites to detect decreases in forest cover in the tropics. (2021-01-04)

Alert system shows potential for reducing deforestation, mitigating climate change
Forest loss declined 18% in African nations where a new satellite-based program provides free alerts when it detects deforestation activities. (2021-01-04)

New data-driven global climate model provides projections for urban environments
Cities only occupy about 3% of the Earth's total land surface, but they bear the burden of the human-perceived effects of global climate change, researchers said. Global climate models are set up for big-picture analysis, leaving urban areas poorly represented. In a new study, researchers take a closer look at how climate change affects cities by using data-driven statistical models combined with traditional process-driven physical climate models. (2021-01-04)

Researchers discover a new tool for reconstructing ancient sea ice to study climate change
A previously problematic molecule turns out to be a reliable proxy for reconstructing sea ice, a new study by Brown University researchers shows. (2021-01-04)

Scientists find the error source of a sea-ice model varies with the season
Scientists evaluated the sea-ice simulations of the Arctic regional ocean-ice coupling configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) and found there were disagreements between the simulations and observations in both March and September. (2020-12-30)

International research team calls for 'glocal' approach to help mitigate flooding damage
Scientists suggest large-scale global forecasting and on-the-ground observations need to meld into one system to better predict and prevent wide-spread flooding disasters (2020-12-24)

A new TanSat XCO2 global product for climate studies
The 1st Chinese carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring satellite mission, TanSat, was launched in 2016. The 1st TanSat global map of CO2 dry-air mixing ratio (XCO2) measurements over land was released as version 1 data product with an accuracy of 2.11 ppmv (parts per million by volume) in 2017. A new (version 2) TanSat global XCO2 product is now released. (2020-12-24)

RUDN University scientist showed global warming effect on greenhouse gas emissions in paddy soils
A soil scientist from RUDN University studied the decomposition of organic matter in rice paddies--the sources of CO2 and methane emissions. Both gases add to the greenhouse effect and affect climate warming in subtropical regions. The emissions increase when the roots of plants influence microbial communities in the soil. This influence, in turn, depends on temperature changes. Therefore, climate warming can lead to more greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-12-24)

Climate crisis is causing lakes to shrink
Climate change is impacting not only the oceans, but also large inland lakes. As the world's largest lake, the Caspian Sea is a perfect example of how a body of water can and will change. In an article in the Nature journal Communications Earth & Environment, Dr. Matthias Prange of MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, and his colleagues discuss the possible ecological, political and economic consequences, as well as viable solutions. (2020-12-23)

Capturing 40 years of climate change for an endangered Montana prairie
Over 40 years of monitoring, an endangered bunchgrass prairie became hotter, drier and more susceptible to fire annually--but dramatic seasonal changes (not annual climate trends) seem to be driving the biggest changes in plant production, composition, and summer senescence. Gary Belovsky and Jennifer Slade of The University of Notre Dame, Indiana, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 23, 2020. (2020-12-23)

A groggy climate giant: subsea permafrost is still waking up after 12,000 years
After the Last Glacial Maximum some 14,000 years ago, rising temperature melted glaciers and ice caps worldwide. Over thousands of years, sea levels rose by more than 400 feet (130 meters). (2020-12-22)

Pandemic and forthcoming stimulus funds could bring climate targets in sight -- or not
The lockdowns that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the recovery phase, emissions could rise to levels above those projected before the pandemic. It all depends on how the stimulus money that governments inject into their economies is spent. A team of scientists, led by Dr. Yuli Shan and Professor Klaus Hubacek, University of Groningen, has quantified how different recovery scenarios may affect global emissions and climate change. (2020-12-22)

Coastal ecosystems 'bright spots'
CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, has identified coastal 'bright spots' to repair marine ecosystems globally, paving the way to boost biodiversity, local economies and human wellbeing. (2020-12-21)

Climate change: threshold for dangerous warming will likely be crossed between 2027-2042
The threshold for dangerous global warming will likely be crossed between 2027 and 2042 - a much narrower window than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate of between now and 2052. In a study published in Climate Dynamics, researchers from McGill University introduce a new and more precise way to project the Earth's temperature. Based on historical data, it considerably reduces uncertainties compared to previous approaches. (2020-12-21)

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