Current Climate Change News and Events | Page 25

Current Climate Change News and Events, Climate Change News Articles.
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Climate change could threaten sea snails in mid-Atlantic waters
Climate change could threaten the survival and development of common whelk -- a type of sea snail -- in the mid-Atlantic region, according to a study led by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. (2020-03-11)

Coral reefs 'weathering' the pressure of globalization
More information about the effects human activities have on Southeast Asian coral reefs has been revealed, with researchers looking at how large-scale global pressures, combined with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate pattern, can detrimentally impact these delicate marine ecosystems. (2020-03-11)

Power struggles hinder urban adaptation policies to climate change
Transformative actions implemented by cities to address and mitigate the impacts of climate change may be hindered by political struggles for municipal power. This is clear from a study developed by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) and the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), published in the journal Cities. (2020-03-11)

Crocs' better parenting skills could make them more resilient to climate change
The ability of crocodiles to survive mass extinctions could be in part due to their more hands-on approach to parenting, say scientists at the University of Bath's Milner Centre for Evolution. (2020-03-11)

Melting glaciers will challenge some salmon populations and benefit others
A new Simon Fraser University-led study looking at the effects that glacier retreat will have on western North American Pacific salmon predicts that while some salmon populations may struggle, others may benefit. (2020-03-11)

New flood damage framework helps planners prepare for sea-level rise
Princeton researchers have developed a new framework allowing urban planners and policymakers to consider a combination of responses to sea-level rise and, if hard structures, how high these protections should be built, depending on their tolerance for risk and the projected financial losses to a particular area due to flooding. (2020-03-11)

Cycling to work linked to higher risk of injury-related hospitalization among UK commuters
Cycling to work is associated with a higher risk of admission to hospital for an injury than other modes of commuting, suggests a UK study published in The BMJ today. (2020-03-11)

Warming mountaintops put snake at risk of extinction
Climate change is a key factor contributing to the likely extinction of the Greek meadow viper, a new study has found. (2020-03-11)

Research shows mangrove conservation can pay for itself in flood protection
The natural coastal defenses provided by mangrove forests reduce annual flooding significantly in critical hotspots around the world. Without mangroves, flood damages would increase by more than $65 billion annually, and 15 million more people would be flooded, according to a new study published March 10, 2020 in Scientific Reports. (2020-03-10)

HKU paleontologists discover solid evidence of formerly elusive abrupt sea-level jump
Meltwater pulses (MWPs) known as abrupt sea-level rise will inevitably affect cities especially those on coastal plains of low elevation. A recent study published in Quaternary Science Reviews presented evidence of abrupt sea level change between 11,300-11,000 years ago in the Arctic Ocean, solving the puzzle of second largest meltwater pulse (labelled as ''MWP-1B'' next to the largest and already well understood MWP-1A). (2020-03-10)

Climate shifts prompt shrubs and trees to take root in open areas
Wild, treeless landscapes are becoming more wooded as climate change leads to warming temperatures and wetter weather, research suggests. (2020-03-10)

Planet's largest ecosystems collapse faster than previously forecast
New research has shown that large ecosystems such as rainforests and coral reefs can collapse at a significantly faster rate than previously understood. The findings suggest that ecosystems the size of the Amazon forests could collapse in only 49 years and the Caribbean coral reefs in just 15 years. (2020-03-10)

Why organisms shrink
Everyone is talking about global warming. A team of paleontologists at GeoZentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has recently investigated how prehistoric organisms reacted to climate change, basing their research on belemnites. These shrunk significantly when the water temperature rose as a result of volcanic activity approximately 183 million years ago, during the period known as the Toarcian. The FAU research team published their results in the online publication Royal Society Open Science. (2020-03-09)

From climate change awareness to action
Awareness of climate change and its impacts is not enough to move people to action. New research on how people's worldviews affect their perceptions and actions could help policymakers and activists reframe the discussion around climate change mitigation. (2020-03-09)

How new data can make ecological forecasts as good as weather forecasts
Soon, University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologist Ben Zuckerberg thinks we'll be able to pull off the same forecasting feat for bird migrations and wildlife populations as for climate forecasts. That's because just as those recurring changes in climate have predictable consequences for humans, they also have predictable effects on plants and animals. (2020-03-09)

Indian Ocean phenomenon spells climate trouble for Australia
New international research has found a worrying change in the Indian Ocean's surface temperatures that puts southeast Australia on course for increasingly hot and dry conditions. (2020-03-09)

Climate change at Mount Rainier to increase 'mismatch' between visitors, wildflowers
The wildflowers of Mount Rainier's subalpine meadows, which bloom once the winter snowpack melts, are a major draw for the more than 1 million visitors to this national park in Washington state each spring and summer. But by the end of this century, scientists expect that snow will melt months earlier due to climate change. New research led by the University of Washington shows that, under those conditions, many visitors would miss the flowers altogether. (2020-03-09)

Climate variations may impact the base of the food web along the California coast
A recent study conducted by researchers at Cal Poly revealed that in addition to seasonal changes in oceanographic conditions, natural climate cycles greatly influenced the base of the food web at the Cal Poly Pier in Central California. These natural climate oscillations influenced the seasonal timing and abundance of different phytoplankton groups, which impact marine ecosystem health differently, and may offer a glimpse of how these organisms will respond to future climate change-driven ocean warming. (2020-03-09)

Natural contaminant threat to drinking water from groundwater
Climate change and urbanisation are set to threaten groundwater drinking water quality, new research from UNSW Sydney shows. (2020-03-09)

World-first system forecasts warming of lakes globally
Pioneering research led by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) has devised the first system that classifies lakes globally, placing each of them in one of nine 'thermal regions.' This will enable scientists to better predict future warming of the world's lakes due to climate change, and the potential threat to cold-water species such as salmon and trout. (2020-03-06)

Damaging impacts of warming moderated by migration of rainfed crops
Many studies seek to estimate the adverse effects of climate change on crops, but most research assumes that the geographic distribution of crops will remain unchanged in the future. New research using 40 years of global data, led by Colorado State University, has found that exposure to rising high temperatures has been substantially moderated by the migration of rainfed corn, wheat and rice. Scientists said continued migration, however, may result in significant environmental costs. (2020-03-06)

What we don't know (about lakes) could hurt us
As the power of extreme weather events increase with climate change, a team of scientists warn that lakes around the world may dramatically change, threatening ecosystem health and water quality. (2020-03-05)

Deep-sea fish community structure strongly affected by oxygen and temperature
In a new study, researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) took advantage of the natural oceanographic gradient in the Gulf of California to study the effects of variable oxygen levels and temperatures on demersal fish communities. They determined that in regions containing very low levels of oxygen (7 μmol/kg of oxygen or less), fish diversity declined dramatically. (2020-03-05)

Cool beans: A vertical crop fit for Africa's changing climate and nutritional gaps
A new study maps where climbing beans are suitable in parts of Africa for future scenarios of food security as climate change threatens traditional bean production. (2020-03-05)

Scientists say it is time to save the red sea's coral reef
An international group of researchers led by Karine Kleinhaus, MD, of the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), calls upon UNESCO to declare the Red Sea's 4000 km of coral reef as a Marine World Heritage Site and recommends additional measures critical for the reef's survival. the study is published in Frontiers in Marine Sciences. (2020-03-05)

Satellite data boosts understanding of climate change's effects on kelp
Tapping into 35 years of satellite imagery, researchers have dramatically enlarged the database regarding how climate change is affecting kelps, near-shore seaweeds that provide food and shelter for fish and protect coastlines from wave damage. (2020-03-05)

More accurate climate change model reveals bleaker outlook on electricity, water use
A model developed by Purdue University researchers more accurately captures how climate change will impact electricity and water use. The researchers recommend that city planners use the model now to better evaluate potential risk of power shortages and blackouts. (2020-03-05)

New version of Earth model captures detailed climate dynamics
DOE laboratories are collaborating on a new high-resolution Earth systems model to predict climate trends into the next century. The model will provide the scientific basis by which to mitigate the effects of extreme climate on energy and other essential services. (2020-03-03)

World's sandy beaches under threat from climate change
Half of the world's beaches could disappear by the end of the century due to coastal erosion, according to a new study led by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service. (2020-03-03)

Ancient Australian trees face uncertain future under climate change, study finds
Tasmania's ancient rainforest faces a grim future as a warming climate and the way people used the land have brought significant changes to the island state off mainland Australia's southeastern coast, according to a new Portland State University study (2020-03-03)

With 30,000 surveys, researchers build the go-to dataset for smallholder farms
Household surveys are key to understanding smallholder farms but research organizations and development agencies did not always consider interoperability, complicating attempts for wide-scale data analysis. CGIAR researchers began tackling the household survey interoperability problem in 2015. More than 13,000 standardized surveys and 21 countries later, they published their findings, methods and analysis of their massive dataset in February in Scientific Data, a Nature publication. The use of the survey tool continues to expand. (2020-03-03)

New model shows winners, losers among marine microbes in warming oceans
A changing climate is warming oceans, creating winners and losers among plankton and algae at the base of the food chain. USC researchers created a tool to model future conditions in marine environments. (2020-03-03)

Nutrient pollution and ocean warming negatively affect early life of corals
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) found the survival and development of coral larvae in their first few days of life was negatively affected by elevated nutrients and a modest increase in water temperature. (2020-03-03)

'Digital disruption' a game-changer for climate: Future Earth report
The climate crisis requires strategic engagement of 4 powerful 'digital disruptors' to shift systems and mindsets obstructing adequate responses. In a new Future Earth report, over 250 international experts prescribe next steps to advance this process. Historically, the report underlines, climate and digital agendas have been approached independently but increasingly are recognized as intertwined.  (2020-03-02)

Deep-sea coral gardens discovered in the submarine canyons off south Western Australia
Stunning 'gardens' of deep-sea corals have been discovered in the Bremer Canyon Marine Park by Australian and international scientists during an oceanographic expedition aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor. (2020-02-28)

KIST develops biofuel production process in cooperation with North American researchers
Biofuel is often touted as a clean fuel, but the fact that it is made using food sources is a major drawback. To address this issue, there has been continuous research on the development of second-generation biofuels using lignocellulosic biomass. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) recently announces that it has developed an effective biofuel production process through the KIST-UBC (University of British Colombia) lab program in Vancouver, Canada. (2020-02-28)

A dam right across the North Sea
A 475-km-long dam between the north of Scotland and the west of Norway and another one of 160 km between the west point of France and the southwest of England could protect more than 25 million Europeans against the consequences of an expected sea level rise of several meters over the next few centuries. (2020-02-28)

How much does black carbon contribute to climate warming?
Black carbon particles -- more commonly known as soot -- absorb heat in the atmosphere. For years, scientists have known that these particles are having an effect on Earth's warming climate, but measuring their exact effect has proved elusive. (2020-02-28)

Containing methane and its contribution to global warming
Methane is a gas that deserves more attention in the climate debate as it contributes to almost half of human-made global warming in the short-term. A new IIASA study shows that it is possible to significantly contribute to reduced global warming through the implementation of available technology that limits methane release to the atmosphere. (2020-02-28)

Researchers solve old biodiversity mystery
The underlying cause for why some regions are home to an extremely large number of animal species may be found in the evolutionary adaptations of species, and how they limit their dispersion to specific natural habitats. This was shown in a new study by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Smithsonian Institution. The research sheds new light on an old controversy regarding the origin of biodiversity. (2020-02-27)

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