Current Clinical Microbiology News and Events | Page 2

Current Clinical Microbiology News and Events, Clinical Microbiology News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
phyloFlash: New software for fast and easy analysis of environmental microbes
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen are developing a user-friendly method to reconstruct and analyze SSU rRNA from raw metagenome data. (2020-11-06)

Researchers identify key marker to help speed development of CMV vaccines
A Duke Health-led research team has identified a key marker that will help speed effective vaccine designs for cytomegalovirus (CMV), the most common congenital infection worldwide and a leading cause of infant brain damage. (2020-11-04)

Transparent soil-like substances provide window on soil ecology
By using two different transparent soil substitutes, scientists have shown that soil bacteria rely on fungi to help them survive dry periods, says a study published today in eLife. (2020-11-03)

How the immune system remembers viruses
For a person to acquire immunity to a disease, T cells must develop into memory cells after contact with the pathogen. Until now, the number of cells that do this was believed to depend above all on the magnitude of the initial immune response. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now called this into question. (2020-11-02)

Washing hands and Halloween candy can mitigate COVID-19 contamination risks
New research shows that COVID-19 exposure risk from contaminated candy could be successfully mitigated both by washing hands and washing candy using a simple at-home method. A team of researchers published this work today in mSystems, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-10-30)

Drug resistance linked to antibiotic use and patient transfers in hospitals
Understanding the role of antibiotic use patterns and patient transfers in the emergence of drug-resistant microbes is essential to crafting effective prevention strategies, suggests a study published today in eLife. (2020-10-27)

Study reveals differences in malaria clearance between males and females
Females are able to clear asymptomatic malaria infections at a faster rate than their male counterparts, says a study published today in eLife. (2020-10-27)

Tracking the SARS-CoV-2 virus with genome sequencing
Dirk Dittmer, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine, is tracking the virus that causes COVID-19 by sequencing the genome of virus samples collected from diagnostic testing. Using next generation sequencing on SARS-CoV-2 will help accurately diagnose the novel coronavirus, identify mutations and track its history. (2020-10-21)

Patients who had more severe covid-19 may be the best donors for convalescent plasma therapy
Sex, age, and severity of disease may be useful in identifying COVID-19 survivors who are likely to have high levels of antibodies that can protect against the disease. (2020-10-19)

In recovering COVID-19 patients, antibodies fade quickly
This week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers report that antibody levels in the blood of COVID-19 patients drop rapidly during the weeks after their bodies have cleared the virus and symptoms have subsided. If convalescent plasma is ultimately shown to have a clear benefit, the authors concluded, then it needs to be collected during a specific window of time after recovery. (2020-10-16)

Does science have a plastic problem? Microbiologists take steps to reducing plastic waste
A research group based at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute, developed an approach to reduce plastic waste produced by their lab. They have shared their approach in the journal Access Microbiology, with the hope that other labs will follow suit. (2020-10-15)

Novel antiviral strategy for treatment of COVID-19
A research team led by Professor Hongzhe SUN, Norman & Cecilia Yip Professor in Bioinorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, and Professor Kwok Yung YUEN, Henry Fok Professor in Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), has discovered a novel antiviral strategy for treatment of COVID-19. (2020-10-15)

New study suggests crucial role for lymphocytes in asymptomatic COVID-19 infection
A retrospective study of 52 COVID-19 patients, published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, may help researchers better understand why not everyone show symptoms of the disease. The study's authors found that asymptomatic patients hosted viral loads comparable to those of symptomatic patients, but asymptomatic patients showed higher levels of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell responsible for immune responses), cleared the viral particles faster, and had lower risks of long-term complications. (2020-10-14)

Research demonstrates microbiome transmissibility in perennial ryegrass
Tannenbaum's most surprising discovery? Finding a stable bacterial microbiome within surface-sterilized ryegrass seeds that almost disappears when the plant matures but returns in a new generation of seed. (2020-10-14)

Therapy using immune system cells preserves vision in mice implanted with rare eye cancer
A treatment that uses immune system T cells, combined with an immune-boosting drug packaged in an injectable gel, was found to preserve the vision of mice implanted with retinoblastoma tissue. The cancer, which is most commonly diagnosed in infants and young children, is treatable in early stages but can still lead to the loss of vision in about 5% of cases. (2020-10-12)

Detecting SARS-CoV-2 in the environment
Researchers have outlined an approach to characterize and develop an effective environmental monitoring methodology for SARS CoV-2 virus, that can be used to better understand viral persistence in built environments. The investigators from 7 institutions published their research this week in mSystems, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-10-07)

Researchers advance COVID-19 antibody knowledge with paper in journal
Researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center working with colleagues at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have found that some antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are more protective than others, when it comes to reinfection. (2020-10-01)

Feeding C-section newborns their mother's poop may help build healthy microbiota
A paper published October 1, 2020 in the journal Cell suggests that newborns delivered by cesarean may benefit from drinking a small amount of their mother's feces dissolved in breast milk, because it provides them with beneficial bacteria they would otherwise be exposed to in vaginal birth. At three months, the procedure resulted in the newborns having a microbial makeup that looks more similar to babies born vaginally than to those born by C-section. (2020-10-01)

Can the common cold help protect you from COVID-19?
A new study in mBio provides the first evidence that the seasonal colds you've had in the past could protect you from COVID-19. The study, authored by infectious disease experts at the University of Rochester Medical Center, also suggests that immunity to COVID-19 is likely to last a long time - maybe even a lifetime. (2020-09-29)

Water at the end of the tunnel
We humans need oxygen to breath - for a lot of microbes it is a lethal poison. That is why microorganisms have developed ways to render oxygen molecules harmless. Microbiologists from Bremen, Marburg and Grenoble have now succeeded in decrypting such a mechanism. They show, how methane-generating microbes transform oxygen into water without causing any damage to the cell. These findings are relevant for future bio-inspired processes. (2020-09-28)

Scientists Discover Genetic and Immunologic Underpinnings of Some Cases of Severe COVID-19
New findings by scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators help explain why some people with COVID-19 develop severe disease. The findings also may provide the first molecular explanation for why more men than women die from COVID-19. (2020-09-24)

The Lancet journals: Papers at Lancet journals' session at ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID)
The following papers will be presented at a Lancet journals' session at ECCVID 2020, organised by European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. The conference will take place online on Wednesday 23rd to Friday 25th September 2020, the society's first online conference focussing exclusively on COVID-19. (2020-09-23)

Divide and enlarge
Researchers discover a mechanism that causes cell nuclei to grow. (2020-09-22)

Researchers find diminished response by 'killer' T cells in elderly COVID-19 patients
Although people of any age can become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, elderly patients face a higher risk of severity and death than younger patients. New research comparing the immune response among age groups, published this week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, may help explain why. Older patients with the disease have lower frequencies of the immune cells needed to expel the virus from the body, the researchers found. (2020-09-21)

Social distancing and microbial health
Social distancing is a key component of the expert-recommended strategy to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Avoiding contact with others, however, may have repercussions in a person's gut microbiome. In a perspective published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, a group of microbiologists in Portugal call for scientists to more closely examine the ways in which COVID-19 -- and our response to it--interact with microbial health. (2020-09-16)

CU researchers now better understand ovarian cancer tumors and treatment outcomes
After nearly four years of work, a group of researchers and clinicians from CU published a paper this week in the Clinical Cancer Research that shares findings from research looking at how the composition of ovarian cancer tumors changes during chemotherapy and contributes to therapeutic response. (2020-09-15)

Neutralizing antibodies appear to protect humans from coronavirus infection
A Seattle fishing vessel that departed port in May returned 18 days later with an unusual haul: the first human evidence that neutralizing antibodies provide protection from reinfection by SARS-CoV-2. The research is published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-08-26)

New analysis shows hydroxychloroquine does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and is associated with increased mortality when combined with the antibiotic azithromycin
A new meta-analysis of published studies into the drug hydroxychloroquine shows that it does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and using it combined with the antibiotic azithromycin is associated with a 27% increased mortality. The study is published in Clinical Microbiology and Infection. (2020-08-26)

Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs are equally effective for diagnosing COVID-19
Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs collected by healthcare providers are equally effective for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study conducted by ARUP Laboratories and University of Utah (U of U) Health. (2020-08-20)

Evolution in real-time: How bacteria adapt to their hosts
Bacteria that invade animal cells in order to multiply are widespread in nature. Some of these are pathogens of humans and animals. (2020-08-18)

Cryo-EM study yields new clues to chicken pox infection
Stanford and SLAC scientists studying the varicella zoster virus found that an antibody that blocks infection doesn't work exactly as they'd thought. (2020-08-18)

Ultra-low voltage proven effective at killing bacteria, study finds
Research into the antimicrobial properties of ultra-low voltage electricity demonstrates that the power creates holes in the bacteria's outer membrane allowing two-way leakage and ultimately killing the cell. (2020-08-17)

Pregnant mother's immunity tied to behavioral, emotional challenges for kids with autism
Children with autism born to mothers who had immune conditions during their pregnancy are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems, a UC Davis Health study has found. Offspring sex may also interact with maternal immune conditions to influence outcomes, particularly in terms of a child's cognition. (2020-08-14)

Virus uses decoy strategy to evade immune system, Otago research reveals
University of Otago researchers have learnt more about how viruses operate and can evade the immune system and are now using their discovery to help learn more about COVID-19. (2020-08-13)

A new, 20-minute assay for COVID-19 diagnosis
Researchers have developed a new test that can diagnose COVID-19 in just 20 minutes. The findings, published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology, show the rapid molecular test called N1-STOP-LAMP, is 100% accurate in diagnosing samples containing SARS-CoV-2 at high loads. (2020-08-13)

Protein uses two antiviral strategies to ward off infections
To protect humans against infection, a protein called MARCH8 tags the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) for destruction while it merely holds HIV hostage, a new study in eLife shows. (2020-08-11)

Experimental COVID-19 vaccine prevents severe disease in mice
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a COVID-19 vaccine candidate from a replicating virus. This experimental vaccine has proven effective at preventing pneumonia in mice. (2020-08-11)

Scientists discover curious clues in the war between cf bacteria
Several different kinds of bacteria can cause lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can cause pneumonia, typically infects infants or young children and persists for life, while Burkholderia cepacia complex species only infect teenagers and adults. Although Burkholderia infections are rare, when they do take hold, they are deadly. Now, UNC School of Medicine scientists have discovered a reason for this pathogen's apparent age discrimination. (2020-08-07)

Scientists discover new concept of bacterial gene regulation
Microbiologist Prof. Kai Papenfort and his team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) discovered a new mechanism of autoregulation during gene expression that relies on small regulatory ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) and the major endoribonuclease RNase E. (2020-08-06)

Children's National Hospital case report sounds the alarm for antibiotic resistance
A recent meningitis case at Children's National Hospital raises serious concerns about antibiotic resistance in the common bacterium that caused it, researchers from the hospital write in a case report. Their findings, published online August 3 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society, could change laboratory and clinical practice across the US and potentially around the globe (2020-08-03)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.