Current Clinical Trial News and Events

Current Clinical Trial News and Events, Clinical Trial News Articles.
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Monoclonal antibodies against MERS coronavirus show promise in phase 1 NIH-sponsored trial
A randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 1 clinical trial of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the coronavirus that causes MERS found that they were well tolerated and generally safe when administered simultaneously to healthy adults. The experimental mAbs target the MERS coronavirus (MERS CoV) spike protein used by the virus to attach to and infect target cells. The mAbs were discovered and developed by scientists at the biopharmaceutical company Regeneron. The trial was sponsored by NIAID. (2021-02-23)

Yale neurologists identify consistent neuroinflammatory response in ICH patients
Understanding how the immune system responds to acute brain hemorrhage could open doors to identifying treatments for this devastating disease. However, up until now, there has been limited information on inflammation in the brain from human patients, especially during the first days after a hemorrhagic stroke. This led a team of researchers to partner with a large clinical trial of minimally-invasive surgery to tackle defining the human neuroinflammatory response in living patients. (2021-02-22)

New recommendations aim to eliminate racial bias in myeloma trials
Recommendations designed to address the under-representation of African Americans in clinical trials for multiple myeloma (MM), a blood cancer that is twice as deadly in this demographic as in whites. (2021-02-18)

Neoadjuvant combination immunotherapy improves outcomes for early stage non-small cell lung cancer
The first randomized Phase II clinical trial to report on single and combined neoadjuvant immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy in stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found combination therapy produced a significant clinical benefit. (2021-02-18)

Penn-developed CAR T therapy shows long-lasting remissions in non-hodgkin lymphoma
A significant number of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients in a Penn Medicine-initiated clinical trial continue to be in remission five years after receiving the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah™, researchers in Penn's Abramson Cancer Center reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2021-02-17)

Immunotherapy -- targeted drug combination improves survival in advanced kidney cancer
Patients with advanced kidney cancer, who received a targeted drug combined with a checkpoint-blocker immunotherapy agent had longer survival than patients treated with the standard targeted drug, said an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial. (2021-02-13)

Low-income middle-aged African-American women with hypertension are likely to suffer from depression
Low-income middle-aged African-American women with high blood pressure very commonly suffer from depression and should be better screened for this serious mental health condition. (2021-02-11)

Rabies treatment demonstrated as safe and effective for use in children in first pediatric trial
A treatment, known as KEDRAB (Rabies Immune Globulin [Human]), currently used in the prevention of rabies has been demonstrated to be safe and effective for patients age 17 and under. (2021-02-10)

Virtual reality helping to treat fear of heights
Researchers from the University of Basel have developed a virtual reality app for smartphones to reduce fear of heights. Now, they have conducted a clinical trial to study its efficacy. Trial participants who spent a total of four hours training with the app at home showed an improvement in their ability to handle real height situations. (2021-02-10)

'Gamechanger' drug for treating obesity cuts body weight by 20%
One third (35%) of people who took a new drug for treating obesity lost more than one-fifth of their total body weight, according to a major global study involving UCL researchers. (2021-02-10)

Vegan diet better for weight loss and cholesterol control than Mediterranean diet
A vegan diet is more effective for weight loss than a Mediterranean diet, according to a groundbreaking new study that compared the diets head to head. The randomized crossover trial, which was published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, found that a low-fat vegan diet has better outcomes for weight, body composition, insulin sensitivity, and cholesterol levels, compared with a Mediterranean diet. (2021-02-05)

Drug 'breakthrough' gives longest-ever survival in nonresectable liver cancer patients
New follow-up data from a landmark study of liver cancer patients treated with a combination of an immunotherapy drug (atezolizumab) and a monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab) has shown the longest-ever survival time in a frontline phase 3 trial of systemic therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), demonstrating a 'major breakthrough' in the field. (2021-02-05)

Dual treatments help PTSD and depression
Reducing the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression - an urgent concern in the era of COVID-19 lockdown and isolation traumas - may benefit from dual treatments rather than a single treatment protocol, according to Flinders University researchers. (2021-02-04)

Pharmacologist offers plan to solve disparities in designing medicine
In a new perspective piece published in the Feb. 5 issue of Science, Johns Hopkins pharmacologist Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., outlines the molecular origins for differences in how well certain drugs work among distinct populations. She also lays out a four-part plan to improve the equity of drug development. (2021-02-04)

Test for early detection of heart problems reduces risk of heart damage from chemotherapy
Results of a multi-centre, international, clinical trial co-led by Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMCC) cardiologist Dr. Dinesh Thavendiranathan point to the benefit of using a more sensitive test to detect heart function issues early, so cancer patients don't have to fight heart failure too. (2021-02-02)

Neuromuscular disease registry helps patients access research, clinical trials, new genetic tests, and therapies
Amsterdam, February 2, 2021 - The Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry (CNDR) was launched in 2010 to increase efficient patient access to cutting-edge research and clinical trials, to increase understanding of the natural history and epidemiology of neuromuscular disease across Canada, and to facilitate research collaboration. (2021-02-02)

Patients with lung cancer reduce smoking rate after enrollment in phase III clinical trial
The first comprehensive, prospective study of smoking habits in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were enrolled in a phase III early-stage trial revealed that there was a high rate of smoking reduction and cessation following study entry, according to research published today in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. (2021-02-01)

Nivolumab effective treatment for malignant mesothelioma
Nivolumab monotherapy is an effective treatment option for relapsed malignant mesothelioma (MM), according to research presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer World Conference on Lung Cancer. (2021-01-30)

Reduced-dose RT with Cisplatin improves outcomes for HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma
A combination of reduced-dose radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with concurrent cisplatin met the threshold for disease control and quality of life compared to the standard of care for good-risk patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma on the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-HN002. (2021-01-29)

Sotorasib provides durable clinical benefit for patients with NSCLC and KRAS mutations
In the phase II CodeBreak 100 trial, sotorasib provided durable clinical benefit with a favorable safety profile in patients with pretreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and who harbor KRAS p.G12C mutations, validating CodeBreak 100's phase I results, according to research presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer World Conference on Lung Cancer. (2021-01-28)

Trying to beat a coke habit with cannabis? Not so fast !
Taking cannabidiol, a chemical in the cannabis sativa plant, isn't an effective way to reduce your dependence on cocaine, researchers at the CHUM Research Centre find. (2021-01-27)

In preclinical models, antiviral better inhibits COVID-19 than Remdesivir; further studies warranted
Working in preclinical models, researchers report that plitidepsin, a drug with limited clinical approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, is more potent against SARS-CoV-2 than remdesivir, an antiviral that received FDA emergency use authorization for the treatment of COVID-19 in 2020. (2021-01-25)

New maintenance treatment for acute myeloid leukemia prolongs the lives of patients
Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common form of acute leukemia in adults, that has gone into remission following initial chemotherapy remain in remission longer and have improved overall survival when they are given a pill form of the cancer drug azacitidine as a maintenance treatment, according to a randomized, international phase 3 clinical trial for which Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian are trial sites. (2021-01-22)

Pre-surgery chemotherapy is possible for early stage pancreatic cancer patients
A first-of-its-kind randomized clinical trial found that patients with pancreatic cancer didn't live any longer than expected after receiving pre-operative chemotherapy from either of the two standard regimens, according to trial results published in JAMA Oncology. (2021-01-21)

Investigational combo therapy shows benefit for TP53 mutant MDS and AML patients
Moffitt Cancer Center is leading a national, multicenter clinical trial investigating a new therapy option for this group of patients. It builds upon the standard of care therapy, combining eprenetapopt (APR-246) with the chemotherapy azacitidine. Results of the phase 1b/2 trial to determine the safety, recommended dose and efficacy of the combination therapy were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. (2021-01-21)

Gastrointestinal surgery can be a cure for type 2 diabetes finds new long-term study
The results of a randomised clinical trial with the longest follow up to date show that metabolic surgery is more effective than medications and lifestyle interventions in the long-term control of severe type 2 diabetes. (2021-01-21)

New trial finds arthritis drug no better than standard care for severe covid-19
Adding the arthritis drug tocilizumab to standard care for patients in hospital with severe or critical covid-19 is no better than standard care alone in improving clinical outcomes at 15 days, finds a new trial published by The BMJ today. (2021-01-20)

Target of new cancer treatment valid for breast as well as blood cancers: study
Newly published research shows that a new anti-cancer drug developed at the University of Alberta, set to begin human trials this year, may work against breast cancer as well as blood cancer. (2021-01-20)

Benvitimod cream: a new topical treatment for plaque psoriasis
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by skin plaques and itching. Currently, the most common topical treatments for psoriasis are corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogs. But these drugs have various side-effects. A recent phase III clinical trial of the novel non-steroidal compound benvitimod in China, published in Chinese Medical Journal, shows that it is safe and effective and could be a promising new topical treatment for psoriasis. (2021-01-19)

Study demonstrates efficacy of new treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1-related tumors
Based on preclinical studies of an investigational drug to treat peripheral nerve tumors, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) as part of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium have shown that the drug, cabozantinib, reduces tumor volume and pain in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results of the Phase 2 clinical trial, co-chaired by Michael J. Fisher, MD at CHOP, were published recently in Nature Medicine. (2021-01-14)

Scientists reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome
KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that explains why some people experience abdominal pain when they eat certain foods. The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Hope for children with rare heart condition: novel stem cell therapy to save the day
In a new study, scientists at Okayama University isolated cardiac stem cells and assessed their potential use as regenerative therapy in young patients with cardiac defects. They confirmed the safety and effectiveness of their proposed treatment in early-phase trials and even identified the mechanism through which the stem cells improved cardiac function. Based on these preliminary findings, they hope to proceed to larger clinical trials and move towards pharmaceutical approval in the future. (2021-01-12)

Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains. (2021-01-12)

Consent forms design influences patient willingness to share personal health information
Patients are sometimes asked to share their personal health information for research purposes. Informed consent and trust are critical components in a patient's decision to participate in research. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a three-arm randomized controlled trial to compare the effects on patient experiences of three electronic consent (e-consent) designs that asked them to share PHI for research purposes. (2021-01-12)

New tech helping cancer patients manage symptoms
Hundreds of cancer patients have benefitted from using computer algorithms to manage their symptoms and improve their wellbeing in a unique UK trial by the University of Leeds. Patients tested the eRAPID system which allowed them to report online symptoms from home and receive instant advice on whether to self-manage or seek medical attention. (2021-01-08)

Beating the bulge with a nice cup of tea
Researchers led by the University of Tsukuba found that healthy volunteers who consumed oolong tea every day had much higher levels of fat breakdown compared with the placebo group, and that the effects were most noticeable during sleep. Importantly, the volunteers developed a tolerance to caffeine over the 2-week study period, with their sleep patterns remaining unaffected by tea or caffeine consumption, indicating that oolong tea may have clinical relevance for weight control. (2021-01-06)

Retracted scientific paper persists in new citations, study finds
University of Illinois information sciences professor Jodi Schneider is leading an effort to prevent the spread of retracted research. (2021-01-05)

Peer-reviewed report on Moderna COVID-19 vaccine publishes
The investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 was 94.1% efficacious in preventing symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), according to preliminary results from a Phase 3 clinical trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The vaccine also demonstrated efficacy in preventing severe COVID-19. Investigators identified no safety concerns and no evidence of vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). (2020-12-30)

Global trial reveals life saving drug for acute myeloid leukemia
Results from a global trial across 148 sites in 23 countries, showing a 30 per cent improvement in survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), significantly improving survival in older patients, over the age of 55, with the disease. AML is the most acute blood cancer in adults and its incidence increases with age, with a poor prognosis. (2020-12-23)

Liquid bandage detects tissue oxygenation without the drawbacks of wired oximeters
A paint-on, transparent bandage containing phosphorescent materials reads the amount of oxygen reaching transplanted tissue -- a critical component of a transplant's success. Existing oximeter technology is complicated to use, restricts patients' movements, and is subject to false alarms. The first human trial of the liquid bandage in women undergoing breast reconstruction after cancer found that it performed as well as a wired oximeter device, the current clinical standard. (2020-12-22)

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