Current Clinical Trials News and Events

Current Clinical Trials News and Events, Clinical Trials News Articles.
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Dietary adherence and the fight against obesity
While eating less and moving more are the basics of weight control and obesity treatment, finding ways to help people adhere to a weight-loss regimen is more complicated. Understanding what features make a diet easier or more challenging to follow can help optimize and tailor dietary approaches for obesity treatment. (2021-01-25)

In preclinical models, antiviral better inhibits COVID-19 than Remdesivir; further studies warranted
Working in preclinical models, researchers report that plitidepsin, a drug with limited clinical approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, is more potent against SARS-CoV-2 than remdesivir, an antiviral that received FDA emergency use authorization for the treatment of COVID-19 in 2020. (2021-01-25)

University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have tested a new combination therapy in animal models to see if they could find a way to make an already effective treatment even better. Since they're using a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to do it, this could help people sooner than later. (2021-01-22)

Pre-surgery chemotherapy is possible for early stage pancreatic cancer patients
A first-of-its-kind randomized clinical trial found that patients with pancreatic cancer didn't live any longer than expected after receiving pre-operative chemotherapy from either of the two standard regimens, according to trial results published in JAMA Oncology. (2021-01-21)

Randomized trials could help to return children safely to schools - study
Schools are closing again in response to surging levels of COVID-19 infection, but staging randomized trials when students eventually return could help to clarify uncertainties around when we should send children back to the classroom, according to a new study. (2021-01-21)

Do antidepressants help chronic back pain and osteoarthritis?
Antidepressants are commonly used worldwide to treat pain, however new research from the University of Sydney shows they offer little to no help for people suffering chronic back pain and osteoarthritis and may even cause harm. (2021-01-20)

Antidepressants largely ineffective for back pain and osteoarthritis
Antidepressant drugs are largely ineffective for back and osteoarthritis pain, despite being widely used for these conditions, suggests a review of the evidence published by The BMJ today. (2021-01-20)

Target of new cancer treatment valid for breast as well as blood cancers: study
Newly published research shows that a new anti-cancer drug developed at the University of Alberta, set to begin human trials this year, may work against breast cancer as well as blood cancer. (2021-01-20)

Study demonstrates efficacy of new treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1-related tumors
Based on preclinical studies of an investigational drug to treat peripheral nerve tumors, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) as part of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium have shown that the drug, cabozantinib, reduces tumor volume and pain in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results of the Phase 2 clinical trial, co-chaired by Michael J. Fisher, MD at CHOP, were published recently in Nature Medicine. (2021-01-14)

New PTSD biotypes enables improved tests, sheds light on divergent treatments efficacy
Researchers from the PTSD Systems Biology Consortium identified distinct biotypes for post-traumatic stress disorder, the first of their kind for any psychological disorder. These biotypes can refine the development of screening tools and may explain the varying efficacy of PTSD treatments. PTSD diagnosis is complicated by over-reliance on self-reporting of patient symptoms, particularly underreporting signs of distress due to perceived stigma. Researchers identified two PTSD biotypes with differing genetic markers and underlying mechanisms of disease. (2021-01-14)

Scientists are a step closer to developing 'smart' stem cells - made from human fat
These new, adaptive stem cells can lie dormant until needed, a new animal study using human cells shows. (2021-01-13)

Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for nursing mothers?
The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) does not recommend cessation of breastfeeding for individuals who are vaccinated against COVID-19. (2021-01-12)

Scientists reach new milestone in vaccine development for leishmaniasis
Researchers have taken an important step forward in developing a controlled human infection model to test leishmaniasis vaccines. (2021-01-11)

Physician-pharmacist collaboration may increase adherence to opioid addiction treatment
A collaborative approach to treating opioid use disorder that relies heavily on community pharmacists is feasible and may increase adherence and participant satisfaction, according to a pilot study published today in Addiction. The study was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, through the NIDA Center for the Clinical Trials Network. (2021-01-11)

Study explains why patients with cancer spread to the liver have worse outcomes
A new study finds that tumors in the liver siphon off critical immune cells, rendering immunotherapy ineffective. But coupling immunotherapy with radiotherapy to the liver in mice restored the immune cell function and led to better outcomes. (2021-01-04)

Combined approach could boost breast cancer immunotherapy, study suggests
Activating an immune signaling pathway best known for fighting viral and bacterial infections can boost the ability of genetically engineered T cells to eradicate breast cancer in mice, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina. The study, to be published December 31 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that CAR T cells, which are already used to treat certain blood cancers in humans, may also be successful against solid tumors if combined with other immunotherapeutic approaches. (2020-12-31)

E-cigarettes, as consumer products, do not help people quit smoking, study finds
E-cigarette use has risen steeply and mostly without regulation over the past decade. The devices have diversified into a dizzying array of vape pens, tank systems, ''mods,'' and more, mass-marketed and sold to the public. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is in the midst of considering whether to approve thousands of pre-market applications for the sale of e-cigarettes as consumer products. (2020-12-22)

Sex-specific Alzheimer's treatment could benefit males over females
A University of Ottawa study found a specific Alzheimer's treatment is effective in male and not female mice, providing a window into the biology of the disease and the effectiveness of targeted treatments. (2020-12-21)

New toolkit aims to improve quality of thrombosis data in COVID-19 trials
The ASH Research Collaborative (ASH RC) and the International Society of Haemostasis and Thrombosis (ISTH), two organizations with multidisciplinary expertise in blood clotting and bleeding disorders, have developed a toolkit to help clinical researchers from across medical disciplines design clinical trials that further the understanding of blood clotting events associated with COVID-19. (2020-12-17)

Two-year study details dynamics of Huntington's disease markers in patients
A new two-year longitudinal study reveals how two proteins linked to Huntington's disease - an incurable neurodegenerative disorder - change over time in patients and in as-yet asymptomatic people who carry a mutation that causes the condition. (2020-12-16)

The Lancet Global Health: Pregnant women excluded from three-quarters of COVID-19 treatment trials
Pregnant women are among those most in need of safe and effective therapies against COVID-19, but they are routinely excluded from the majority of clinical treatment trials, according to authors of an opinion piece based on a review of international trial registry data, published in The Lancet Global Health journal. (2020-12-16)

Clowns may help children cope with the pain and anxiety of hospital treatment
Hospital clowns might help improve physical symptoms and psychological wellbeing in children and adolescents having treatment for acute or chronic conditions, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Study finds paediatric cancer patients at no greater risk of severe COVID-19 infection
Children with cancer who test positive for COVID-19 do not appear to be at an increased risk of severe COVID-19 infection compared to healthy children, according a new UK study. (2020-12-14)

New report finds global health research infrastructure imperiled by COVID-19
A new report released today from the non-profit Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC) finds that The strong foundation of global health research and development (R&D) that greatly accelerated the development of COVID-19 innovations is now being weakened by pandemic pressures that are diverting funding and expertise away from other dangerous diseases and putting clinical trials and scientific endeavors around the world on indefinite hold. (2020-12-11)

Genes could be key to new COVID-19 treatments, study finds
Potential treatments for Covid-19 have been identified after the discovery of five genes associated with the most severe form of the disease. (2020-12-11)

From publication bias to lost in information
From publication bias to lost in information In BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, IQWiG researchers call for a central, public and worldwide portal for clinical trials (2020-12-11)

The ethics of human challenge trials
The first human challenge trial to test COVID-19 treatments and vaccines is set to begin in January in the United Kingdom. Daniel Hausman, a research professor at Rutgers Center for Population-Level Bioethics discussed the findings of his recently published paper in the Journal of Medicine & Philosophy examining ethical issues of challenge trials. (2020-12-09)

Single-eye gene therapy improves vision in both eyes of patients with inherited eye disorder
A gene therapy for an inherited eye disorder can ameliorate vision loss in both eyes despite only being injected into one, according to a phase 3 clinical trial involving 37 patients. (2020-12-09)

Long-term study of gene therapy technique in monkeys finds no adverse health effects
A decade after the birth of the first primates born with the aid of a gene therapy technique designed to prevent inherited mitochondrial disease, a careful study of the monkeys and their offspring reveals no adverse health effects. The new study generally bolsters the scientific basis for mitochondrial replacement therapy in human clinical trials, with an important caveat: Researchers found varying levels of carryover maternal mitochondrial DNA that had preferentially replicated and accumulated within some internal organs, although not enough to cause health effects. (2020-12-08)

Circulating tumor DNA indicates risk of relapse after transplant in DLBCL patients
Many patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be cured by a transplant using their own blood-forming stem cells, but as many as half eventually relapse. New research led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists suggests that patients whose blood or stem cell samples harbor tumor DNA are likely to relapse. (2020-12-07)

First in nation treatment for chronic subdural hematoma at Los Robles Health System
Los Robles Health System is leading the way in neurovascular clinical trials. Interventional neurologist, Dr. Asif Taqi, is the principal investigator of the STEM Study, a landmark trial that can change the management of chronic subdural hematomas completely. Los Robles enrolled and treated the first patient in the nation into this trial. (2020-12-04)

Can COVID-19 vaccine trials continue ethically once an efficacious candidate is found?
In a Perspective, David Wendler and colleagues propose guidance on when it can be ethical to continue placebo-controlled COVID-19 vaccine trials after an effective and safe candidate is found - a topic that is particularly relevant given the recent announcements of success in several late-stage clinical trials. (2020-12-03)

SWOG Cancer Research Network hits SABCS with high impact research
SWOG Cancer Research Network members will share results of five network-led studies at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, or SABCS, an international gathering of breast cancer physicians and researchers expected to draw 8,000 virtual attendees from more than 80 countries that runs Dec. 8-11. (2020-12-02)

RASi associated with reduced risk of KRT compared with CCB in CKD patients
In a population-based Swedish database, researchers studied the clinical outcomes of starting renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASi) or calcium channel blockers (CCB) in 2,458 patients with CKD G4-5. Compared with CCB, RASi initiation was associated with a lower risk of KRT, but similar risks of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings suggest that RASi initiation might slow the progression of kidney disease compared with CCB in patients with advanced CKD, and offer similar cardiovascular protection. (2020-11-24)

Study: TB vaccine linked to lower risk of contracting COVID-19
A widely used tuberculosis vaccine is associated with reduced likelihood of contracting COVID-19 (coronavirus), according to a new study by Cedars-Sinai. The findings raise the possibility that a vaccine already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may help prevent coronavirus infections or reduce severity of the disease. (2020-11-20)

WHO Guideline Development Group advises against use of remdesivir for covid-19
The antiviral drug remdesivir is not suggested for patients admitted to hospital with covid-19, regardless of how severely ill they are, because there is currently no evidence that it improves survival or the need for ventilation, say a WHO Guideline Development Group (GDG) panel of international experts in The BMJ today. (2020-11-19)

Immunotherapy for lung and other cancers may also be beneficial for rare skin cancer
New research from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center found immunotherapies effective against lung cancer and melanoma may work against cutaneous angiosarcoma, a rare, highly aggressive skin tumor found primarily on the scalps of older White people. The researchers report tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and the surface protein markers PD-1 and PD-L1 could help guide the choice of immunotherapy to fight cutaneous angiosarcomas. (2020-11-18)

UTHSC researchers identify three drugs as possible therapeutics for COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center working with colleagues at the University of New Mexico have identified three drugs, already approved for other uses in humans, as possible therapeutics for COVID-19, the illness caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-11-18)

Comprehensive safety testing of COVID-19 vaccines based on experience with prior vaccines
'The urgent need for COVID-19 vaccines must be balanced with the imperative of ensuring safety and public confidence in vaccines by following the established clinical safety testing protocols throughout vaccine development, including both pre- and post-deployment,' write David M. Knipe and colleagues in this Perspective. (2020-11-17)

Hydroxychloroquine does not help patients hospitalized with COVID-19: Study
Findings from a national study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) ''do not support'' the use of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

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