Current Cloaking News and Events

Current Cloaking News and Events, Cloaking News Articles.
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Ebola is a master of disguise
Ebola is so pernicious because it pulls a fast one on the body, disguising itself as a dying cell. A study published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, identifies a pathway that all filoviruses use to gain entry into our cells--and shows how they can be stopped in their tracks by at least one FDA-approved drug. (2021-02-11)

Active camouflage artificial skin in visible-to-infrared range
Cephalopods' exceptional ability to hide into any background has inspired researchers to replicate their fascinating ability to camouflage in the infrared (IR) and visible spectrum. Recent advances offered a number of physical mechanisms to reproduce the cloaking functionalities of cephalopods. However, most of works focused on either camouflaging in the visible or IR camouflage range only: not dual modes in a single device structure that can readily switch between the visible and IR mode according to a suitable situation. (2020-12-02)

Immunotherapy side effect could be a positive sign for kidney cancer patients
An autoimmune side effect of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) drugs could signal improved control of kidney cancer, according to a new study by researchers in UT Southwestern's Kidney Cancer Program (KCP). (2020-11-02)

Cancer immunotherapy 'uniquely suppressed' by liver tumors
Though cancer immunotherapy has become a promising standard-of-care treatment--and in some cases, perhaps a cure--for a wide variety of different cancers, it doesn't work for everyone, and researchers have increasingly turned their attention to understanding why. (2020-10-02)

Topology-optimized thermal cloak-concentrator
Cloaking a concentrator in thermal conduction via topology optimization. A simultaneous cloaking and concentrating of heat flux is achieved through topology optimization, a computational structural design methodology. (2020-09-24)

Immune 'cloaking' in cancer cells and implications for immunotherapy
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and the Moffitt Cancer Centre have created a mathematical model that can determine the impact of the immune system on tumour evolution. (2020-09-16)

Designing a flexible material to protect buildings, military personnel
Now, a team of engineers led by Guoliang Huang, a James C. Dowell Professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has designed a flexible material that can help buildings withstand multiple waves of energy traveling through a solid material, including the simultaneous forward and backward and side-to-side motions found in earthquakes. (2020-05-26)

Peculiar behavior of the beetle Toramus larvae
When studying the larval morphology of Toramini (Coleoptera: Erotylidae) we found that larvae of the genus Toramus attach their exuviae to their distal abdomen, with each exuvia from the preceding instar attached to the next to form a vertical pile. Exuvial attachment is facilitated by modified hook-like setae with flattened shafts inserted into the exuvia of the previous instar. We discuss the possibility that the exuvial attachment serves as a kind of autotomy -- ''exuvial autotomy''. (2020-05-21)

How cancer cells don their invisibility cloaks
Immunotherapy drugs that target a protein called programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on the surface of cancer cells have quickly become a mainstay to treat many forms of cancer, often with dramatic results. (2020-04-21)

Turning cold tumors hot: Drug delivery system makes immunotherapy more effective
A new drug delivery system from PME researchers turns 'cold' tumors hot, letting the body's immune system attack hard-to-treat cancers. (2020-04-14)

Bats use leaves as mirrors to find prey in the dark
Bats can find motionless insects on leaves in the dark. This was thought to be impossible, because the acoustic camouflage provided by the leaves should confuse their echolocation system. Inga Geipel and colleagues discovered how bats overcome this problem. (2019-08-01)

Dashing the dream of ideal 'invisibility' cloaks for stress waves
Some have dreamt of the perfect cloak to make buildings impervious to stress waves caused by bombs, earthquakes or other calamities. Sorry, researchers are now dashing the dream. But there's still hope. They also say it's possible to make imperfect, real-world cloaks that will actually do some good by adding significant partial protection against some common earthquake waves. (2019-06-07)

New technique to make objects invisible proposed
Researchers at the University of Extremadura have demonstrated the electromagnetic invisibility of objects using an alternative technique, based on filler cloaking. The novelty lies in achieving invisibility from the interior of the objects, without adding external layers. This approach brings numerous advantages and opens up new applications in optics, communications systems and bioengineering. (2018-11-26)

High-resolution MRI imaging inspired by the humble antenna
Radio frequency (RF) probes designed like by microstrip patch antennas create uniform and strong magnetic field in high frequency MRI machines, unlike convention coil and bird cage shaped coils used today. These probes, which were designed and tested at Michigan Technical University, also showed smaller radiation losses, making them competitive, even advantageous to conventional methods. (2018-10-31)

Extremely small magnetic nanostructures with invisibility cloak imaged
In novel concepts of magnetic data storage, it is intended to send small magnetic bits back and forth in a chip structure, store them densely packed and read them out later. The magnetic stray field generates problems when trying to generate particularly tiny bits. Now, researchers were able to put an 'invisibility cloak' over the magnetic structures. In this fashion, the magnetic stray field can be reduced in a fashion allowing for small yet mobile bits. (2018-10-18)

Invisible needles
An international research group of scientists from Politecnico di Torino (Italy) and NUST MISIS (Russia) has developed a model of a new metamaterial, which will improve the accuracy of nano-sensors in optics and biomedicine by cloaking them from external radiation. The article reporting the results has been recently published in Scientific Reports, a high rank, prestigious interdisciplinary journal, edited by Nature Publishing House. (2018-08-28)

Spectral cloaking could make objects invisible under realistic conditions
Researchers and engineers have long sought ways to conceal objects by manipulating how light interacts with them. A new study offers the first demonstration of invisibility cloaking based on the manipulation of the frequency (color) of light waves as they pass through an object, a fundamentally new approach that overcomes critical shortcomings of existing cloaking technologies. (2018-06-28)

'Stealth' material hides hot objects from infrared eyes
Infrared cameras are the heat-sensing eyes that help drones find their targets even in the dead of night or through heavy fog. Hiding from such detectors could become much easier, thanks to a new cloaking material that renders objects -- and people -- practically invisible. (2018-06-22)

Camouflaged nanoparticles used to deliver killer protein to cancer
A biomimetic nanosystem can deliver therapeutic proteins to selectively target cancerous tumors, according to a team of Penn State researchers. (2018-06-14)

Chinese researchers achieve 3D underwater acoustic carpet cloak first with 'Black Panther'-like features
A research team led by professor YANG Jun from the Institute of Acoustics (IOA) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences designed and fabricated a 3D underwater acoustic carpet cloak (UACC) using transformation acoustics. (2018-06-04)

Cloaking devices -- it's not just 'star trek' anymore
Scientists are now working to take cloaking devices from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make them real. Amanda D. Hanford, at Pennsylvania State University, is taking the introductory steps to make acoustic ground cloaks. These materials redirect approaching waves around an object without scattering the wave energy, concealing the object from the sound waves. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Hanford will describe the physics behind an underwater acoustic shield designed in her lab. (2018-05-10)

3-D printed active metamaterials for sound and vibration control
Researchers have been pushing the capabilities of materials by carefully designing precise structures that exhibit abnormal properties that can control acoustic or optical waves. However, these metamaterials are constructed in fixed geometries, meaning their unique abilities are always fixed. Now, new 3-D printed metamaterial developed by a team led by University of Southern California researchers can be remotely switched between active control and passive states. (2018-04-11)

A New Metasurface Model Shows Potential to Control Acoustic Wave Reflection
Typically, when a soundwave strikes a surface, it reflects back at the same fundamental frequency with a different amplitude. A new model, reported in the Journal of Applied Physics, shows that when a sound wave hits a nonlinear elastic metasurface, the incident fundamental frequency does not bounce back. Instead, the metasurface converts that energy into the wave's second harmonic resonance. Developing this metasurface could help architects reduce noise from performance halls to cityscapes. (2018-04-03)

Bridging tumor moats with potent drug delivery particles
Despite herculean efforts, cancer remains a formidable disease, with each malignant subtype responding differently to therapeutics. One hurdle specific to treating solid tumors is a protective layer called an extracellular matrix that can prevent chemotherapeutic agents from penetrating the tumor's core. Scientists now report results in ACS' Chemistry of Materials showing that, by cloaking anti-cancer drugs in a specially designed particle, they could target and destroy tumor cells deep inside a malignant mass in vitro. (2018-01-10)

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake
Engineers at Duke University develop a realistic proposition for creating a water cloak that moves water around an object by applying forces on dissolved ions through a carefully designed electromagnetic field. (2017-12-11)

Can social media users prevent use of online information to characterize and target them?
A new study examines how organizations use information people disclose on social network sites (SNS) to predict their personal characteristics and whether SNS users can successfully block certain information (and how much) to better protect their privacy. (2017-11-20)

Ben-Gurion U. researchers camouflage an optical chip rendering it invisible
The researachers showed that it is possible to bend the light around an object located on the cloak on an optical chip. The light does not interact with the object, thus resulting in the object's invisibility. (2017-11-13)

Synthetic material acts like an insect cloaking device
Synthetic microspheres with nanoscale holes can absorb light from all directions across a wide range of frequencies, making them a candidate for antireflective coatings, according to a team of Penn State engineers. The synthetic spheres also explain how the leaf hopper insect uses similar particles to hide from predators in its environment. (2017-11-03)

The beam of invisibility
Researchers from TU Wien, together with colleagues from Greece and the USA, have now developed a new idea for a cloaking technology. A completely opaque material is irradiated from above with a specific wave pattern -- with the effect that light waves from the left can now pass through the material without any obstruction. This surprising result opens up completely new possibilities for active camouflage. (2017-09-13)

Bit data goes anti-skyrmions
A group of scientists from the Max Planck Institutes in Halle and Dresden have discovered a new kind of magnetic nano-object in a novel material that could serve as a magnetic bit with cloaking properties to make a magnetic disk drive with no moving parts -- a Racetrack Memory -- a reality in the near future. (2017-09-01)

Fungal spore 'death clouds' key in gypsy moth fight
A fungus known to decimate populations of gypsy moths creates 'death clouds' of spores that can travel more than 40 miles to potentially infect populations of invasive moths, according to a new Cornell study. (2017-08-30)

Conformal metasurface coating eliminates crosstalk and shrinks waveguides
The properties of materials can behave in funny ways. Tweak one aspect to make a device smaller or less leaky, for example, and something else might change in an undesirable way, so that engineers play a game of balancing one characteristic against another. Now a team of Penn State electrical engineers have a way to simultaneously control diverse optical properties of dielectric waveguides by using a two-layer coating, each layer with a near zero thickness and weight. (2017-08-25)

Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaks
In an advance that could boost the efficiency of LED lighting by 50 percent and even pave the way for invisibility cloaking devices, a team of University of Michigan researchers has developed a new technique that peppers metallic nanoparticles into semiconductors. (2017-07-19)

Legos and origami inspire next-generation materials
Inspired by the fun of playing with Legos, an international team of researchers from Tianjin University of Technology and Harvard University have used the idea of assembling building-blocks to make the promise of next-generation materials a practical reality. (2017-03-28)

ANU scientists make new high-tech liquid materials
Scientists at The Australian National University have controlled wave-generated currents to make previously unimaginable liquid materials for new technological innovations, including techniques to manipulate micro-organisms. (2017-02-09)

Now you see it, now you don't
University of Utah electrical and computer engineering associate professor Rajesh Menon and his team have developed a cloaking device for microscopic photonic integrated devices -- the building blocks of photonic computer chips that run on light instead of electrical current -- in an effort to make future chips smaller, faster and consume much less power. (2016-11-09)

Metamaterial device allows chameleon-like behavior in the infrared
An electric current will not only heat a hybrid metamaterial, but will also trigger it to change state and fade into the background like a chameleon in what may be the proof-of-concept of the first controllable metamaterial device, or metadevice, according to a team of engineers. (2016-10-27)

Trek-inspired enterprise
After six television series, thirteen movies, and 50 years, 2016 is the year to celebrate the golden anniversary of the Star Trek challenge to, 'Go where no man has gone before.' Scientist and author Mark E. Lasbury declares that 'the legacy of Star Trek and the role it has played in driving research and researchers must be honored.' He achieves this in his new book, The Realization of Star Trek Technologies. (2016-10-13)

Scientists move 1 step closer to creating an invisibility cloak
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have made an object disappear by using a material with nano-size particles that can enhance specific properties on the object's surface. (2016-07-15)

Researchers determine fundamental limits of invisibility cloaks
The researchers' theory confirms that it is possible to use cloaks to perfectly hide an object for a specific wavelength, but hiding an object from an illumination containing different wavelengths becomes more challenging as the size of the object increases. (2016-07-05)

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