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Current Cloning News and Events

Current Cloning News and Events, Cloning News Articles.
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AI uses less than two minutes of videogame footage to recreate game engine
Game studios and enthusiasts may soon have a new tool at their disposal to speed up game development and experiment with different styles of play. (2017-09-11)
Scientists discover powerful potential pain reliever
Chemists have discovered a powerful pain reliever that acts on a previously unknown pain pathway. (2017-08-16)
Powerful new technique can clone thousands of genes at once
Scientists at Johns Hopkins, Rutgers, the University of Trento in Italy, and Harvard Medical School report they have developed a new molecular technique called LASSO cloning, which can be used to isolate thousands of long DNA sequences at the same time, more than ever before possible. (2017-07-05)
Cloning thousands of genes for massive protein libraries
Discovering the function of a gene requires cloning a DNA sequence and expressing it. (2017-06-26)
Why does so much of nature rely on sex for reproduction?
Why is sex so popular among plants and animals, and why isn't asexual reproduction, or cloning, a more common reproductive strategy? (2017-05-04)
New hope in the fight against superbugs
In a new paper published in the journal Structure, researchers from McGill University present in atomic detail how specific bacterial enzymes, known as kinases, confer resistance to macrolide antibiotics, a widely used class of antibiotics and an alternative medication for patients with penicillin allergies. (2017-05-03)
How can a legally binding agreement on human cloning be established?
Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. (2017-03-21)
FASEB Science Research Conference: Glucose Transport: Gateway for Metabolic Systems Biology
This SRC will provide a lively mix of glucose transporter biology, metabolic regulation, and systems biology methods with multiple lectures that feature disease translational themes. (2017-02-28)
How do we regulate advanced technologies along social or ethical lines?
Society faces several new and powerful technologies that could alter the human trajectory into the future and, the public wants clear guidelines as to how these technologies like gene editing are managed to ensure they are used safely. (2017-02-17)
Protecting quantum computing networks against hacking threats
As we saw during the 2016 US election, protecting traditional computer systems, which use zeros and ones, from hackers is not a perfect science. (2017-02-03)
Sex evolved to help future generations fight infection, scientists show
Why does sex exist when organisms that clone themselves use less time and energy, and do not need a mate to produce offspring? (2016-12-20)
Salamanders brave miles of threatening terrain for the right sex partner
Most salamanders are homebodies when it comes to mating. But some of the beasts hit the road, traversing miles of rugged terrain unfit for an amphibian in pursuit of a partner from a far-away wetland. (2016-12-20)
Cow gene study shows why most clones fail
It has been 20 years since Dolly the sheep was successfully cloned, but cloning mammals remains a challenge. (2016-12-09)
David Julius to receive the 2017 HFSP Nakasone Award
The Human Frontier Science Program Organization has announced that the 2017 HFSP Nakasone Award has been awarded to David Julius of the University of California, San Francisco for his 'discovery of the molecular mechanism of thermal sensing in animals.' (2016-11-08)
Fake Tweets, real consequences for the election
The researchers analyzed 20 million election-related tweets created between Sept. (2016-11-04)
Precise quantum cloning: Possible pathway to secure communication
Physicists in Australia have cloned light at the quantum scale, opening the door to ultra-secure encrypted communications. (2016-10-26)
Scientists make embryos from non-egg cells
Scientists have shown for the first time that embryos can be made from non-egg cells, a discovery that challenges two centuries of received wisdom. (2016-09-13)
Refrigerator us warm?
A discovery made at RUDN University allows to substantially increase the production of high-quality planting material of horticultural crops. (2016-09-06)
UW engineers receive $2 million NSF EFRI grant for secure communications research
Two University of Washington professors will explore fundamentally secure communications that exploit the principles of quantum mechanics through a new four-year, $2 million Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation grant from the National Science Foundation. (2016-08-08)
PostDoc Project Plan invites collaborators to study how plant lice cope with variability
While Climate change steadily takes its toll, organisms fight it in various ways. (2016-06-20)
No males needed: All-female salamanders regrow tails 36 percent faster
The lady salamander that shuns male companionship may reap important benefits. (2016-05-02)
TSRI scientists: Immune cell transforms from 'Clark Kent' to 'Superman'
A new study led by scientists at the Scripps Research Institute reveals a previously unknown type of immune cell. (2016-04-04)
Cloning of Northern Mexico cactus proves useful in conservation
In vitro clonal propagation based on axillary bud development was generated for Turbinicarpus valdezianus. (2016-03-28)
Fungus that threatens chocolate forgoes sexual reproduction for cloning
A fungal disease that poses a serious threat to cacao plants -- the source of chocolate -- reproduces clonally, Purdue University researchers find. (2016-03-22)
By cloning mouse neurons, TSRI scientists find brain cells with 100+ unique mutations
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute are the first to sequence the complete genomes of individual neurons and to produce live mice carrying neuronal genomes in all of their cells. (2016-03-03)
Improved harvest for small farms thanks to naturally cloned crops
As hybrid plants provide a very high agricultural yield for only one generation, new hybrid seeds need to be produced and used every year. (2016-01-28)
FASEB 3rd International Conference on Retinoids
This SRC is the third international retinoid conference. With the discovery of the nuclear retinoid receptors, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs), the retinoid field has been implicated in new areas of scientific inquiry including metabolism, metabolic diseases, and neurobiology. (2016-01-22)
How anti-evolution bills evolve
An evolutionary biologist has analyzed political opposition to evolution and found it has evolved. (2015-12-17)
Noise can't hide weak signals from this new receiver
Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a receiver that can detect a weak, fast, randomly occurring signal. (2015-12-11)
'Performance cloning' techniques to boost computer chip memory systems design
Computer engineering researchers have developed software using two new techniques to help computer chip designers improve memory systems. (2015-09-30)
Starfish that clone themselves live longer
Starfish that reproduce through cloning avoid ageing to a greater extent than those that propagate through sexual reproduction. (2015-06-25)
NAS and NAM announce initiative on human gene editing
The National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine are launching a major initiative to guide decision making about controversial new research involving human gene editing. (2015-05-18)
Highly efficient CRISPR knock-in in mouse
CRISPR/Cas -- clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) -- system, which is based on chemically synthesized small RNAs and commercially available Cas9 enzyme, has enabled long gene-cassette knock-in in mice with highest efficiency ever reported. (2015-04-30)
Evolution puts checks on virgin births
A species that has learned to survive without males still needs them. (2015-04-17)
Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project
More than 100 researchers from around the world have collaborated to craft a request that could fundamentally alter how the antibodies used in research are identified, a project potentially on the scale of the now-completed Human Genome Project. (2015-02-04)
Mapping the maize genome
Maize is one of the most important cereal crops in the world. (2015-01-20)
Sex and the single evening primrose
Sex or no sex? Using various species of the evening primrose as his model, Jesse Hollister, a former University of Toronto post-doctoral fellow, and his colleagues have demonstrated strong support for a theory that biologists have long promoted: Species that reproduce sexually, rather than asexually, are healthier over time, because they don't accumulate harmful mutations. (2015-01-12)
Scientist of the year award for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy research
The School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London has been recognized with a national award for its world-class research in the development of novel therapies for rare diseases, such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. (2014-10-29)
Genetic diagnosis can rule out a suspected Huntington's chorea patient
Huntington's disease is an autosomal-dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease with a distinct phenotype, but the pathogenesis is unclear. (2014-05-05)
New research on potent HIV antibodies has opened up possibilities
The discovery of how a KwaZulu-Natal woman's body responded to her HIV infection by making potent antibodies (called broadly neutralizing antibodies, because they are able to kill multiple strains of HIV from across the world), was reported today by the CAPRISA consortium of AIDS researchers jointly with scientists from the United States. (2014-03-03)
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