Current Cloud Cover News and Events

Current Cloud Cover News and Events, Cloud Cover News Articles.
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Simply speaking while infected can potentially spread COVID-19
COVID-19 can spread from asymptomatic but infected people through small aerosol droplets in their exhaled breath. Most studies of the flow of exhaled air have focused on coughing or sneezing; however, speaking while near one another is also risky. In Physics of Fluids, scientists used smoke and laser light to study the flow of expelled breath near and around two people conversing in various relative postures commonly found in the service industry. (2021-02-23)

An eco-route for heavy-duty vehicles could reduce fuel consumption
Semi-trucks and other heavy-duty vehicles are responsible for nearly half of road transportation carbon dioxide emissions in Europe, according to the International Council on Clean Transportation. A team of researchers in Italy has proposed a plan to reduce the emissions without compromising priorities such as delivery times. They published their approach in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, a joint publication of the IEEE and the Chinese Association of Automation. (2021-02-19)

Quantum computing: when ignorance is wanted
Quantum technologies for computers open up new concepts of preserving the privacy of input and output data of a computation. Scientists from the University of Vienna, the Singapore University of Technology and Design and the Polytechnic University of Milan have shown that optical quantum systems are not only particularly suitable for some quantum computations, but can also effectively encrypt the associated input and output data. (2021-02-18)

Human impact on solar radiation levels for decades
Based on the long-term Potsdam radiation time series, ETH Professor Martin Wild and his collaborators have shown that variations in the intensity of sunlight over decades are down to ultra-fine, man-made dirt particles in the atmosphere. (2021-02-18)

Record sunshine during first COVID-19 lockdown largely caused by unusual weather
Exceptional weather conditions were mainly responsible for high solar radiation, not the aerosol reduction due to the shutdown of industry and reduced traffic in the first lockdown / International research team continues to develop climate simulations that take into account influences of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-16)

Bacteria and algae get rides in clouds
Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2021-02-16)

Application of potassium to grass used as cover crop guarantees higher-quality cotton
In an article, Brazilian researchers show that besides simplifying operational logistics and improving production, fertilization of the grass used as a cover crop can reduce fertilizer use in the long run. (2021-02-16)

Comet or asteroid: What killed the dinosaurs and where did it come from?
It forever changed history when it crashed into Earth about 66 million years ago. The Chicxulub impactor, as it's known, left behind a crater off the coast of Mexico that spans 93 miles and runs 12 miles deep. (2021-02-15)

Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Researchers have found a way to use light and a single electron to communicate with a cloud of quantum bits and sense their behaviour, making it possible to detect a single quantum bit in a dense cloud. (2021-02-15)

Cloud simulations get a dose of realism
A focus on the fundamental physics of cloud formation leads to highly realistic simulations of different types of clouds. (2021-02-15)

Climate research: rapid formation of iodic particles over the Arctic
When sea ice melts and the water surface increases, more iodine-containing vapours rise from the sea. Scientists from the international research network CLOUD have now discovered that aerosol particles form rapidly from iodine vapours, which can serve as condensation nuclei for cloud formation. The CLOUD researchers, among them scientists from the Goethe University Frankfurt, fear a mutual intensification of sea ice melt and cloud formation, which could accelerate the warming of the Arctic and Antarctic. (2021-02-11)

Clear-sky detection methods in a highly polluted region still need further improvements
Clear-sky detection methods in a highly polluted region still need further improvements. (2021-02-09)

How iodine-containing molecules contribute to the formation of atmospheric aerosols
As part of a worldwide collaboration, Carnegie Mellon University chemists have helped discover that iodic acids can rapidly form aerosol particles in the atmosphere, giving scientists more knowledge of how iodine emissions can contribute to cloud formation and climate change. (2021-02-05)

Iodine oxoacids drive rapid aerosol formation in pristine atmospheric areas
Iodine plays a bigger role than thought in rapid new particle formation (NPF) in relatively pristine regions of the atmosphere, such as along marine coasts, in the Arctic boundary layer or in the upper free troposphere, according to a new study. (2021-02-04)

Student astronomer finds galactic missing matter
Half of the universe's matter is 'missing', but PhD student Yuanming Wang has developed an ingenious method to help track it down. She has done this using distant galaxies as 'locator pins' to detect an otherwise 'invisible' cold clump of gas just 10 light years from Earth. (2021-02-04)

Drone and landsat imagery shows long-term change in vegetation cover along intermittent river
In the Namib Desert in southwestern Africa, the Kuiseb River, an ephemeral river which is dry most of the year, plays a vital role to the region. It provides most of the vegetation to the area and serves as a home for the local indigenous people, and migration corridor for many animals. The overall vegetation cover increased by 33% between 1984 and 2019, according to a Dartmouth study published in Remote Sensing. (2021-02-03)

Increasing snow depth prevented wintertime soils from cooling during the warming hiatus
Scientists investigated snow cover along with other direct and indirect soil temperature influences in northeastern China. The research further showed that the increasing snow depth in northeastern China may be the main reason for the continued warming trend in soil temperatures. In addition to the thermal insulation effect of snow cover, the ability for soil to record human changes and environmental influences, or ''soil memory'' is also important, especially at greater depths. (2021-01-31)

Yangtze River observational system to improve East Asian rainy season forecasting
A major observation effort deploying airplanes, satellites and ground-based tracking systems was mounted in 2020 along the Yangtze River in China to better describe the physical processes that cause the mei-yu, an intense rainy season that occurs during East Asia's summer monsoon. (2021-01-29)

How vitamins, steroids and potential antivirals might affect SARS-CoV-2
Evidence is emerging that vitamin D -- and possibly vitamins K and A -- might help combat COVID-19. A new study from the University of Bristol published in the journal of the German Chemical Society Angewandte Chemie has shown how they - and other antiviral drugs -- might work. The research indicates that these dietary supplements and compounds could bind to the viral spike protein and so might reduce SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. (2021-01-29)

Listening to the call of the wild: Tracking deer movements using sound
Researchers from The University of Tokyo built a prototype system for monitoring deer populations in the wild using sound recording devices in a grid formation. As the sound recording devices are powered by solar panels and synchronize their internal clocks with GPS satellites, they are suitable for unmanned monitoring. Two trials of the system indicated that it is more accurate and convenient than previous methods of monitoring deer and other ungulates. (2021-01-28)

Crowdfunding? Check weather forecast first!
Investors' moods are affected by gloomy weather. New research from Copenhagen Business School recommends entrepreneurs looking for finance should be aware of the weather forecast at the time they want to launch their crowdfunding campaigns. (2021-01-28)

Arctic ocean expedition advances climate modeling
In-situ cloud, radiation, and surface energy budget data collected by a September 2014 expedition of the Japanese Research Vessel Mirai from a stationary point in the ice-free Arctic Ocean were used to investigate the skill of regional climate models. Although most near-surface meteorological parameters were adequately captured by most models, certain important discrepancies were identified, such as the failure to capture unstable low-level cloud stratification, and the partitioning of ice clouds and liquid clouds. (2021-01-26)

How aerosols are formed
ETH Zurich researchers conducted an experiment to investigate the initial steps in the formation of aerosols. Their findings are now aiding efforts to better understand and model that process - for example, the formation of clouds in the atmosphere. (2021-01-14)

Greenland melting likely increased by bacteria in sediment
Bacteria are likely triggering greater melting on the Greenland ice sheet, possibly increasing the island's contribution to sea-level rise, according to Rutgers scientists. That's because the microbes cause sunlight-absorbing sediment to clump together and accumulate in the meltwater streams, according to a Rutgers-led study - the first of its kind - in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The findings can be incorporated in climate models, leading to more accurate predictions of melting, scientists say. (2021-01-14)

Climate change doesn't spare the smallest
With a combined century of experience in the tropics, the University of Pennsylvania's Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs have seen a striking contraction of insect numbers and diversity. They share new data suggesting that climate change is the culprit and a way to protect the survivors: a bioliteracy program that aims to educate Costa Rican residents about the diversity around them and empower them to conserve it. It's a model they hope catches on and spreads around the globe. (2021-01-14)

Researchers at Brazil's space institute discover why lightning branches and flickers
Analysis of the first super slow motion recordings of upward flashes suggests a possible explanation for the formation of luminous structures after electrical discharges split in the atmosphere. (2021-01-13)

Northern lakes at risk of losing ice cover permanently, impacting drinking water
Close to 5,700 lakes in the Northern Hemisphere may permanently lose ice cover this century, 179 of them in the next decade, at current greenhouse gas emissions, despite a possible polar vortex this year, researchers at York University have found. Those lakes include large bays in some of the deepest of the Great Lakes, such as Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, which could permanently become ice free by 2055. (2021-01-13)

Characteristics of severe thunderstorm and lightning activity in the Beijing metropolitan region
Severe thunderstorm is a kind of high-impact weather process producing lightning, heavy precipitation, hails, and wind gust, and still very difficult to be forecasted accurately up to now. A recent study published in Science China: Earth Sciences reported the characteristics of thunderstorm and lightning activity in the Beijing metropolitan region, and the result indicated that lightning data could be assimilated into the numerical weather model to improve the forecast of severe thunderstorm and heavy precipitation. (2021-01-12)

Accelerating AI computing to the speed of light
A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material. (2021-01-08)

Subscriptions to satellite alerts linked to decreased deforestation in Africa
Deforestation dropped by 18 percent in two years in African countries where organizations subscribed to receive warnings from a new service using satellites to detect decreases in forest cover in the tropics. (2021-01-04)

New proposal for how aerosols drive increased atmospheric convection in thunderstorm clouds
High in the clouds, atmospheric aerosols, including anthropogenic air pollutants, increase updraft speeds in storm clouds by making the surrounding air more humid, a new study finds. (2020-12-31)

Theory describes quantum phenomenon in nanomaterials
Theoretical physicists Yoshimichi Teratani and Akira Oguri of Osaka City University, and Rui Sakano of the University of Tokyo have developed mathematical formulas that describe a physical phenomenon happening within quantum dots and other nanosized materials. The formulas, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, could be applied to further theoretical research about the physics of quantum dots, ultra-cold atomic gasses, and quarks. (2020-12-23)

Current food production systems could mean far-reaching habitat loss
The global food system could drive rapid and widespread biodiversity loss if not changed, new research has found. (2020-12-21)

Tepary beans -- a versatile and sustainable native crop
This drought and heat tolerant crop can provide nutrition, even when grown in harsh environments. (2020-12-16)

Physicists solve geometrical puzzle in electromagnetism
A team of scientists have solved the longstanding problem of how electrons move together as a group inside cylindrical nanoparticles. (2020-12-16)

Fast walking in narrow corridors can increase COVID-19 transmission risk
Simulations have been used to predict droplet dispersal patterns in situations where COVID-19 might be spread and results in Physics of Fluids show the importance of the space shape in modeling how droplets move. The simulations are used to determine flow patterns behind a walking individual in spaces of different shape. The results reveal a higher transmission risk for children in some instances, such as behind quickly moving people in a long narrow hallway. (2020-12-15)

Applying compost to landfills could have environmental benefits
Many people think of composting organic matter as a way of keeping solid waste out of landfills, but a new study finds there can be significant environmental benefits associated with using compost at landfills. (2020-12-14)

How seaweed-munching crabs could help save coral reefs
Coral reefs are facing a steep decline today for many reasons, including climate change, overfishing, pollution, disease, and more. What's taking their place is lots and lots of seaweed. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 10 now have some encouraging news: native crabs can help to combat the seaweed and restore the reef. (2020-12-10)

Less light, more trees assist migrating birds
Scientists from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Colorado State University used observations from the Lab's eBird citizen-science program to estimate the seasonal species richness of nocturnally migrating passerines within 333 well surveyed urban areas in the contiguous U.S. ''Richness'' is defined as the number of different species in an area. (2020-12-09)

Pollution from cooking remains in atmosphere for longer - study
Particulate emissions from cooking stay in the atmosphere for longer than previously thought, making a prolonged contribution to poor air quality and human health, according to a new study. (2020-12-08)

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