Current Cluster News and Events

Current Cluster News and Events, Cluster News Articles.
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Study of auto recalls shows carmakers delay announcements until they 'hide in the herd'
Automotive recalls are occurring at record levels, but seem to be announced after inexplicable delays. A research study of 48 years of auto recalls announced in the United States finds carmakers frequently wait to make their announcements until after a competitor issues a recall - even if it is unrelated to similar defects. (2021-02-22)

Cancer control: Non-DNA changes induce metabolism variations in hepatocellular carcinomas
Mechanisms underlying metabolic variations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a fast growing and invasive cancer, remain unclear. Now, researchers from Fudan University, China identified signatures of ''m6A,'' the most abundant ''post-transcriptional RNA modification,'' that segregate HCC into sub-types with distinct metabolic characteristics. They have also developed a novel m6A score that can quantify such modifications and aid risk assessment, prediction of prognosis, and response to treatment in patients with HCC. (2021-02-22)

Swimming upstream on sound waves
ETH researchers are among the first scientists to have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionising the field of medicine. (2021-02-19)

Hubble uncovers concentration of small black holes
Scientists were expecting to find an intermediate-mass black hole at the heart of the globular cluster NGC 6397, but instead they found evidence of a concentration of smaller black holes lurking there. New data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have led to the first measurement of the extent of a collection of black holes in a core-collapsed globular cluster. (2021-02-11)

Astronomers offer possible explanation for elusive dark-matter-free galaxies
A team led by astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, has found that some dwarf galaxies may today appear to be dark-matter free even though they formed as galaxies dominated by dark matter in the past. (2021-02-09)

New method developed for 'up-sizing' mini organs used in medical research
A team of engineers and scientists has developed a method of 'multiplying' organoids: miniature collections of cells that mimic the behaviour of various organs and are promising tools for the study of human biology and disease. (2021-02-08)

In-depth analysis identifies causes and mitigation efforts in COVID-19 cluster
As part of the response to the cluster, Brigham researchers also conducted a case-control study and whole-genome sequencing to identify factors that may have been involved in the virus's spread as well as the most likely chain of transmission. The lessons gleaned from their data have helped inform infection control efforts. (2021-02-08)

Hydrogen-producing enzyme protects itself against oxygen
Hydrogen-producing enzymes are beacons of hope in biohydrogen research. However, they are so vulnerable to oxygen in the air that it has not been possible to exploit their potential on a larger scale. The recently discovered [FeFe]-hydrogenase CbA5H from the bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii resists the oxygen attack. (2021-02-02)

Searching for dark matter through the fifth dimension
Theoretical physicists of the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are working on a theory that goes beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The central element is an extra dimension in spacetime. Until now, the scientists have faced the problem that the predictions of their theory could not be tested experimentally. They have now overcome this problem in a publication in the current issue of the European Physical Journal C. (2021-02-01)

Precision measurements of intracluster light suggest possible link to dark matter
Faint light from rogue stars not bound to galaxies has been something of a mystery to scientists. The dimness of this intracluster light makes it difficult to measure, and no one knows how much there is. Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey, led by Fermilab, have made the most radially extended measurement of this light ever, and they've found that its distribution might point to the distribution of dark matter. (2021-01-27)

Randomized trials could help to return children safely to schools - study
Schools are closing again in response to surging levels of COVID-19 infection, but staging randomized trials when students eventually return could help to clarify uncertainties around when we should send children back to the classroom, according to a new study. (2021-01-21)

Innovations through hair-thin optical fibres
Scientists at the University of Bonn have built hair-thin optical fibre filters in a very simple way. They are not only extremely compact and stable, but also colour-tunable. This means they can be used in quantum technology and as sensors for temperature or for detecting atmospheric gases. The results have been published in the journal ''Optics Express''. (2021-01-20)

Automakers delay recalls to minimize stock penalties, avoid being the first safety issue in news
An initial recall by one firm prompts clusters of additional recalls in close proximity by competitor firms, according to 'Hiding in the Herd: The Product Recall Clustering Phenomenon,' forthcoming in Manufacturing and Service Operations Management from Kaitlin Wowak, assistant professor of IT, analytics, and operations at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business. (2021-01-19)

Synthesis of potent antibiotic follows unusual chemical pathway
Images of a protein involved in creating a potent antibiotic reveal the unusual first steps of the antibiotic's synthesis. The improved understanding of the chemistry behind this process, detailed in a new study led by Penn State chemists, could allow researchers to adapt this and similar compounds for use in human medicine. (2021-01-18)

Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics. (2021-01-12)

When galaxies collide: Hubble showcases six beautiful galaxy mergers
To celebrate a new year, the NASA/ESA Space Telescope has published a montage of six beautiful galaxy mergers. Each of these merging systems was studied as part of the recent HiPEEC survey to investigate the rate of new star formation within such systems. These interactions are a key aspect of galaxy evolution and are among the most spectacular events in the lifetime of a galaxy. (2021-01-07)

Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders
Two-dimensional materials, consisting of a single layer of atoms, have been booming in research for years. They possess novel properties that can only be explained with the help of the laws of quantum mechanics. Researchers have now used ultracold atoms to gain new insights into previously unknown quantum phenomena. They found out that the magnetic orders between two coupled thin films of atoms compete with each other. The study has been published in Nature. (2021-01-06)

Low genetic diversity in two manatee species off South America
A new study finds low genetic diversity in the Antillean manatee off the coast of South America between Venezuela and Brazil. There is no interbreeding with the overlapping Amazonian manatee. The study gives recommendations for conservation actions for these at-risk populations. (2021-01-05)

Prediabetes subtypes identified
All prediabetes is not the same: in people in the preliminary stages of type 2 diabetes, there are six clearly distinguishable subtypes, which differ in the development of the disease, diabetes risk, and the development of secondary diseases. The new classification can help in the future to prevent the manifestation of diabetes or the development of diabetes complications through targeted prevention. (2021-01-04)

New USC study on circadian clock shows "junk DNA" plays a key role in regulating rhythms
Researchers have been trying to figure out what regulates molecular circadian clocks, in search of new insights into diseases like Alzheimer's, cancer and diabetes. Until now, that research has focused on what is known as clock genes. But new research reveals the discovery of a new cog in the circadian clock - a genome-wide regulatory layer made up of small chains of non-coding nucleotides known as micro RNAS (miRNAs). (2021-01-04)

Study identifies distinct sub-types of aggressive tumours to allow for targeted treatment
- Angiosarcomas are clinically aggressive tumours that are more prevalent in Asian populations -Study led by Singapore clinician-scientists has found a way to classify angiosarcomas into three subtypes, allowing for more targeted treatment, better outcomes for patients and the development of new therapies - Findings were published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation this year (2020-12-28)

Transients and synchronization are unified in ecological networks
A new synchronization phenomenon is uncovered in spatially distributed ecological networks. The local patch dynamics are of the chaotic predator-prey type and the network possess certain symmetries in its structure. It is found that the populations of all patches are synchronized in phase but certain subsets of patches can also synchronize in amplitude. During the course of evolution, the subsets of amplitude synchronized patches switch randomly and intermittently among different patterns in a transient fashion. (2020-12-19)

The Milky Way primordial history and its fossil findings
Recently discovered and named, the ''Bulge Fossil Fragments'' represent a new class of stellar systems composed of the relics of primordial massive clumps of gas and stars that originated the core of our galaxy approximately 12 billion years ago (2020-12-18)

CCNY scientists provide new insights into cholera microbe and chances of pandemic strain
Researchers at The City College of New York have uncovered a novel way in which Vibrio cholerae, the aquatic microbe that causes cholera, may increase its competitive fitness, and the likelihood of creating pandemic strains of the bacteria. (2020-12-17)

Bio-inspired lanthanide-transition metal cluster for efficient overall water splitting
A bio-inspired lanthanide-transition metal cluster as oxygen-evolving center anchored on P-doped graphitic carbon nitrides for efficient photocatalytic overall water splitting was demonstrated. Mechanistic investigation shows synergistic effects of lanthanide ion and variable-valence Co ions in the oxygen-evolving reaction. This work not only prepares a synthetic model of bio-inspired oxygen-evolving center but also develops an avenue to design efficient catalysts for overall water splitting by coupling bio-inspired clusters and photoactive supports. (2020-12-10)

A molecule like a nanobattery
How do molecular catalysts function, and what effects do they have? A team of chemical scientists at the University of Oldenburg has come closer to the answers using a model molecule that functions like a molecular nanobattery. It consists of several titanium centres linked to each other by a single layer of interconnected carbon and nitrogen atoms. The researchers' recently published findings combine the results of three multi-year PhD research projects. (2020-12-08)

Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors
Researchers from Bochum, Göttingen, Duisburg and Cologne have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections. They use fluorescent nanosensors to track down pathogens faster and more easily than with established methods. A team headed by Professor Sebastian Kruß, formerly at Universität Göttingen, now at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), describes the results in the journal Nature Communications, published online on 25 November 2020. (2020-11-30)

A new strategy for the greener use of calcium carbide
Computational chemists from St Petersburg University and the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have developed a new strategy for using calcium acetylide in the synthesis of organic compounds. The researchers proposed a new approach by analysing the interaction of calcium acetylide with water and dimethyl sulfoxide on the atomic scale. (2020-11-25)

Palladium, meet copper: Skoltech researchers use machine learning to improve catalysts
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Germany and the US have studied the properties and behavior of a palladium-copper alloy under changing temperatures and hydrogen concentrations, with highly relevant implications of this research for catalyst design. The authors hope that their findings can open the door for designing metal alloys with better catalytic properties by taking into account dynamic changes in the composition and structure of materials at realistic operational conditions. (2020-11-17)

Piecing together the Alaska coastline's fractured volcanic activity
Among seismologists, the geology of Alaska's earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast is fascinating, but not well understood. Now, with more sophisticated tools than before, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team reports unexpected new details about the area's tectonic plates and their relationships to volcanoes. (2020-11-17)

Image release: Galaxies in the Perseus Cluster
New VLA images show how the crowded environment of a cluster of galaxies affects the individual galaxies, helping astronomers better understand some of the complex details of such an environment. (2020-11-12)

Ultrafast laser experiments pave way to better industrial catalysts
Arizona State University's Scott Sayres and his team have recently published an ultrafast laser study on uncharged iron oxide clusters, which could ultimately lead to the development of new and less-expensive industrial catalysts. It might also contribute to a better understanding of the universe since iron oxides are observed in the emission spectra of stars. (2020-11-10)

Most isolated massive stars are kicked out of their clusters
A pair of University of Michigan studies reveals how some massive stars -- stars eight or more times the mass of our sun--become isolated in the universe: most often, their star clusters kick them out. (2020-10-30)

Corporations directing our attention online more than we realize
It's still easy to think we're in control when browsing the internet, but a new study argues much of that is ''an illusion.'' Corporations are ''nudging'' us online more than we realize, and often in hidden ways. Researchers analyzed clickstream data on a million people over one month of internet use to find common browsing sequences, then connected that with site and platform ownership and partnerships, as well as site design and other factors. (2020-10-29)

Smart fluorescent molecular switches based on boron-based compounds
Scientists have developed extremely stable molecular switches of high luminosity that self-assemble into 1D nanostructures and form gel-like materials. These molecular switches can be used in biomedicine as fluorescent probes for imaging or sensing, in fluorescent displays, or in memories and information processing devices. (2020-10-28)

New genes related to autism spectrum disorder
The lack of some genes in the BEC/TCEAL cluster could be related to some alterations associated with the autism spectrum disorder, according to a preclinical study published in the journal Genome Biology, and led by Professor Jordi Garcia Fernàndez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB), and researcher Jaime Carvajal, from the Andalusian Centre for Developmental Biology - University Pablo de Olavide (CSIC-UPO). (2020-10-26)

Star clusters are only the tip of the iceberg
Star clusters have been part of the Imaginarium of human civilization for millennia. The brightest star clusters to Earth, like the Pleiades, are readily visible to the naked eye. A team around astronomer Stefan Meingast at the University of Vienna has now revealed the existence of massive stellar halos, termed coronae, surrounding local star clusters. The paper was published in ''Astronomy & Astrophysics''. (2020-10-15)

Anemic star cluster breaks metal-poor record
In a surprising discovery, astronomers using two Maunakea Observatories - W. M. Keck Observatory and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) - have found a star cluster in the Andromeda Galaxy that contains a record-breaking low amount of metals, calling into question the so-called 'metallicity-floor' for massive globular star clusters. (2020-10-15)

Researchers deconstruct the "biological clock" that regulates birdsong
The precise timing of a bird's complex song is driven in part by the often-ignored ''wires'' connecting neurons in the bird's brain, according to a new study. A team of researchers from Penn State and New York University has deconstructed an important ''biological clock'' that regulates birdsong and other behaviors, leading to new ways of thinking about the function of neuronal networks. (2020-10-15)

The puzzle of the strange galaxy made of 99.9% dark matter is solved
At present, the formation of galaxies is difficult to understand without the presence of a ubiquitous, but mysterious component, termed dark matter. Astronomers have measure how much dark matter there is around galaxies, and have found that it varies between 10 and 300 times the quantity of visible matter. However, a few years ago, the discovery of a very diffuse object, named Dragonfly 44, changed this view. (2020-10-13)

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