Current Coastline News and Events

Current Coastline News and Events, Coastline News Articles.
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Groundwater drives rapid erosion of the Canterbury coastline, New Zealand
Groundwater flow and seepage can form large gullies along coastal cliffs in the matter of days, it has been discovered. (2021-01-12)

Native biodiversity collapse in the Eastern Mediterranean
An international team led by Paolo G. Albano from the Department of Palaeontology at the University of Vienna quantified a dramatic biodiversity collapse of up to 95 per cent of native species in the Eastern Mediterranean. The study is published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. (2021-01-07)

Low genetic diversity in two manatee species off South America
A new study finds low genetic diversity in the Antillean manatee off the coast of South America between Venezuela and Brazil. There is no interbreeding with the overlapping Amazonian manatee. The study gives recommendations for conservation actions for these at-risk populations. (2021-01-05)

Ancient people relied on coastal environments to survive the Last Glacial Maximum
Excavations on the south coast of South Africa have uncovered evidence of human occupations from the end of the last ice age, approximately 35,000 years ago, through the complex transition to the modern time, known as the Holocene and adaptions that were key to our species ability to survive wide climate and environmental fluctuations. (2020-11-23)

Sea turtle nesting season winding down in Florida, some numbers are up and it's unexpected
Florida's sea turtle nesting surveying comes to a close on Halloween and like everything else in 2020, the season was a bit weird. The number of green sea turtle nests on central and southern Brevard County, Florida beaches monitored by University of Central biologists were way up during a year they should have been down based on nearly 40 years of historical data. (2020-10-28)

Summer road trip finds small streams have big impacts on Great Lakes
While decades of monitoring and regulatory efforts have paid little attention to Lake Michigan's tiny tributaries, new research shows that they play an outsized role in feeding algae blooms and impacting coastal waters. (2020-10-26)

Coastal permafrost more susceptible to climate change than previously thought
Research led by Micaela Pedrazas, who earned her masters at The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences working with Professor Bayani Cardenas, has found permafrost to be mostly absent throughout the shallow seafloor along a coastal field site in northeastern Alaska. That means carbon can be released from coastline sources much more easily than previously thought. (2020-10-23)

Sea-level rise projections can improve with state-of-the-art model
Projections of potentially dramatic sea-level rise from ice-sheet melting in Antarctica have been wide-ranging, but a Rutgers-led team has created a model that enables improved projections and could help better address climate change threats. (2020-10-07)

NASA finds tropical storm Noul packing a punch    
Powerful storms with heavy rainmaking capabilities appeared over the coast of central Vietnam in NASA provided infrared imagery on Sept. 17. (2020-09-17)

New research provides global analysis of storm surge footprints
New research provides a global analysis of the footprint of storm surges, providing a first step toward helping decision-makers coordinate flood management and emergency response plans across borders. (2020-09-15)

New analysis reveals where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest
High-resolution ocean modelling has found the world's strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience more intense marine heatwaves than the global average over the coming decades. (2020-08-28)

Sea-level rise linked to higher water tables along California coast
Researchers modeled the effects of rising sea levels along the California coast. While results varied with local topography, the study indicates an increased threat to populated areas already at risk from rising water tables, and the possibility of flooding in unexpected inland areas. (2020-08-21)

First record of invasive shell-boring worm in the Wadden Sea means trouble for oyster
n October 2014, the suspicion arose that the parasite worm Polydora websteri had found its way to the Wadden Sea. Researchers from the German Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), confirm in a publication in Marine Biodiversity, that they have found the shell-borer in oysters near Sylt and Texel and that it has arrived in European waters. (2020-08-06)

Maldives records highest level of micro plastics on the planet
The amount of micro plastic pollution in waters around the Maldives, a global tourist hotspot known for its beautiful coastline, is amongst the highest in the world and has the potential to severely impact marine life in shallow reefs and threaten the livelihoods of island communities. (2020-08-04)

Ancient oyster shells provide historical insights
Scientists studying thousands of oyster shells along the Georgia coast, some as old as 4,500 years, have published new insights into how Native Americans sustained oyster harvests for thousands of years, observations that may lead to better management practices of oyster reefs today. (2020-07-14)

New study sparks fresh call for seagrass preservation
An increase in carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 5 million cars a year has been caused by the loss of seagrass meadows around the Australian coastline since the 1950s. PhD student Cristian Salinas from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Western Australia calculated that around 161,150 hectares of seagrass have been lost from Australian coasts since the 1950s. This has resulte in a 2 per cent increase in annual carbon dioxide emissions from land-use change. (2020-07-07)

First confirmed underwater Aboriginal archaeological sites found off Australian coast
Ancient submerged Aboriginal archaeological sites await underwater rediscovery off the coast of Australia, according to a study published July 1, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jonathan Benjamin of Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia and colleagues. (2020-07-01)

Microplastic pollution accumulates heavily in coastal areas such as fjords and estuaries
Microplastic pollution in marine environments is concentrated most highly in coastal habitats, especially fjords and estuaries, according to a new review article published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin. (2020-06-30)

Red Sea's coral reefs help protect the KSA coast
Modeling shows that coral reefs off the east coast of Saudi Arabia have a vital role in protecting the coastal zone. (2020-06-28)

Two-thirds of Americans think government should do more on climate
A new Pew Research Center report examining U.S. views of climate change and other environmental issues, including attitudes toward expanding renewable energy and the federal government's response to climate change. (2020-06-23)

Seafood helped prehistoric people migrate out of Africa, study reveals
A study, led by the University of York, has examined fossil reefs near to the now-submerged Red Sea shorelines that marked prehistoric migratory routes from Africa to Arabia. The findings suggest this coast offered the resources necessary to act as a gateway out of Africa during periods of little rainfall when other food sources were scarce. (2020-06-16)

Scientists find key factors impacting sideswiping tropical cyclone precipitation
Scientists find that the distribution of sideswiping tropical cyclones precipitation(STP) includes extreme STP events that appear not only over the island and coastal areas, but also over inland areas (2020-06-15)

Scientists warn against 'greenwashing' of global coastal developments
An international team of scientists has said the artificial structures and reclaimed land that are now commonplace in coastal urban areas all over the world are often poor surrogates for the natural environment they replace. (2020-06-09)

Mangrove trees won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if emissions aren't cut
Mangrove trees -- valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates - won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren't reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Science. Using sediment data from the last 10,000 years, an international team led by Macquarie University in Australia estimated the chances of mangrove survival based on rates of sea-level rise. (2020-06-04)

Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found. (2020-05-28)

Migration patterns reveal an Eden for ancient humans and animals
CU researcher, Jamie Hodgkins, Ph.D., discovered a new migration pattern (or lack of) at Pinnacle Point, a now-submerged region in South Africa. While it was first believed large omnivores would travel to follow the growth of vegetation to survive, our researcher came to a completely new conclusion through studying antelope teeth! Hodgkins discovered that this region was an Eden to all living species that called it home, including the earliest humans. (2020-05-22)

Climate change will turn coastal Antarctica green, say scientists
Scientists have created the first ever large-scale map of microscopic algae as they bloomed across the surface of snow along the Antarctic Peninsula coast. Results indicate that this 'green snow' is likely to spread as global temperatures increase. (2020-05-20)

How climate killed corals
A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016. If we're counting culprits: it's two by sea, one by land. (2020-05-18)

Climate change: Extreme coastal flooding events in the US expected to rise
Extreme flooding events in some US coastal areas could double every five years if sea levels continue to rise as expected, a study published in Scientific Reports suggests. Today's 'once-in-a-lifetime' extreme water levels -- which are currently reached once every 50 years -- may be exceeded daily along most of the US coastline before the end of the 21st century. (2020-04-16)

Increasingly mobile sea ice risks polluting Arctic neighbors
The movement of sea ice between Arctic countries is expected to significantly increase this century, raising the risk of more widely transporting pollutants like microplastics and oil, according to new research from CU Boulder. (2020-03-18)

Scientists say it is time to save the red sea's coral reef
An international group of researchers led by Karine Kleinhaus, MD, of the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), calls upon UNESCO to declare the Red Sea's 4000 km of coral reef as a Marine World Heritage Site and recommends additional measures critical for the reef's survival. the study is published in Frontiers in Marine Sciences. (2020-03-05)

World's sandy beaches under threat from climate change
Half of the world's beaches could disappear by the end of the century due to coastal erosion, according to a new study led by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service. (2020-03-03)

Freshwater flowing into the North Pacific plays key role in North America's climate
Massive freshwater river flows stemming from glacier-fed flooding at the end of the last ice age surged across eastern Washington to the Columbia River and out to the North Pacific Ocean, where they triggered climate changes throughout the northern hemisphere. (2020-02-26)

Satellite image data reveals rapid decline of China's intertidal wetlands
Researchers from the school of Geographical Sciences at Guangzhou University have revealed the stark decline of China's intertidal wetlands by studying archives of satellite imaging data. The area of these wetlands reduced by 37.62% between the 1970s and 2015, placing these vulnerable yet valuable ecosystems and the species they support under increased pressure from anthropogenic development and future sea level rise. (2020-02-14)

NASA analyzes ex-Tropical Cyclone Damien's rainfall in Western Australia
Tropical Cyclone Damien made landfall on Feb. 9 along the northern Pilbara coast of Western Australia. On Feb. 10, the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite analyzed the rainfall generated by the remnants that triggered warnings. (2020-02-10)

Large 'herbivores of the sea' help keep coral reefs healthy
Selective fishing can disrupt the delicate balance maintained between corals and algae in embattled Caribbean coral reefs. (2020-01-09)

NASA sees Tropical Storm 06A maintaining strength
NASA's Aqua satellite found some powerful storms in Tropical Storm 06A as it moved through the Arabian Sea toward Somalia. (2019-12-04)

Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought
Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth -- but new research by the University of South Australia suggests it could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought. (2019-12-01)

Microplastics found in oysters, clams on Oregon coast, PSU study finds
Tiny threads of plastics are showing up in Pacific oysters and razor clams along the Oregon coast -- and the yoga pants, fleece jackets, and sweat-wicking clothing that Pacific Northwesterners love to wear are a source of that pollution, according to a new Portland State University study. (2019-11-12)

Coastlines' contribution to climate change might have been underestimated
Permafrost coasts make up about one third of the Earth's total coastline. As a result of accelerated climate change, whole sections of coastline rapidly thaw, and erode into the Arctic Ocean. A new study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters now shows that large amounts of carbon dioxide are potentially being produced along these eroding permafrost coastlines in the Arctic. (2019-11-08)

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