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Current Cocaine News and Events, Cocaine News Articles.
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Regional trends in overdose deaths reveal multiple opioid epidemics, according to new study
A recently published study shows the United States in the grip of several simultaneously occurring opioid epidemics, rather than just a single crisis. The epidemics came to light after the researchers analyzed county-level data on drug overdose deaths. The study highlights the importance of different policy responses to the epidemics rather than a single set of policies. (2019-12-09)

New protein function could be key to treatment of drug addiction and behavioral disorders
The reward pathway of the brain causes feelings of happiness but is also involved in behavioral disorders like schizophrenia and addiction. A breakthrough study by scientists in Japan has now identified the role of a protein called Npas4 in the reward pathway, mediated by the well-known proteins MAPK and CBP, opening doors to potential therapies for associated disorders. Cocaine-treated mice with inactivated Npas4 exhibited considerable reduction in cocaine-seeking behavior, emphasizing the relevance of the protein. (2019-12-05)

Relevant social stimuli may reduce interest in drugs
Researchers of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Malaga (UMA), specialized in addictive disorders, have demonstrated in an animal model that the presence of a relevant social stimulus reduces interest in cocaine. (2019-11-15)

Injection drug use: a new study shows a mixed Canadian portrait
In Canada, 171,900 people injected drugs in 2016, up from 130,000 in 2011. In a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) estimated, using multiplier methods, the number of people who injected drugs in 11 of the 13 Canadian provinces (Nunavut and Northwest Territories not included) and reported a 30-per-cent increase in the period studied. (2019-11-14)

Seeing past the stigma
Plants of the genus Erythroxylum are mainly known due to their use either in Coca Cola or as the drug cocaine. The controversial cultivation of the plants is an important income source for many farming communities in South American countries. A new interdisciplinary review now highlights the domestication history of the genus and examines numerous possible positive use cases of Erythroxylum, e.g. as medicines. (2019-11-14)

Drug dust
Researchers at Harvard University and the Drug Enforcement Administration have designed a promising new tool that can identify smaller concentrations of drug powders than any other device. Portable, simple to use, and cost effective, the technology could provide law enforcement officers and forensic chemists a quick and accurate way to identify unknown, potentially dangerous, substances. (2019-11-12)

Fingerprint test can distinguish between those who have taken or handled heroin
A state-of-the-art fingerprint detection technology can identify traces of heroin on human skin, even after someone has washed their hands -- and it is also smart enough to tell whether an individual has used the drug or shaken hands with someone who has handled it. (2019-11-11)

Study: A mother's warmth, sensitivity can mitigate obesity risk factors in infants
An ongoing longitudinal University at Buffalo study being presented Nov. 5, 2019 in Las Vegas at ObesityWeek is among the first to explore how mother-infant behaviors during feeding and active play (non-feeding situations) affect infants and children in families with low socioeconomic status. (2019-11-05)

Of all professions, construction workers most likely to use opioids and cocaine
Construction workers are more likely to use drugs than workers in other professions, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU College of Global Public Health. (2019-10-30)

Drug overdose deaths in CT doubled in 6 years
Opioid overdose deaths in Connecticut doubled in the past 6 years, largely driven by use of multiple drugs together, according to a team of researchers from the University of Connecticut and Yale University. (2019-10-29)

Mapping international drug use through the world's largest wastewater study
A seven-year project monitoring illicit drug use in 37 countries via wastewater samples shows that cocaine use was skyrocketing in Europe in 2017 and Australia had a serious problem with methamphetamine. (2019-10-23)

Mapping international drug use by looking at wastewater
Wastewater-based epidemiology is a rapidly developing scientific discipline with the potential for monitoring close to real-time, population-level trends in illicit drug use. The results of the international monitoring campaigns performed annually over seven years (2011-2017) by an international group of scientists, the SCORE group (Sewage analysis CORe group Europe), are now compiled in an article published in the prestigious journal Addiction. (2019-10-23)

Advances in transcriptomics give single cell views of brain development and disease
Advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing technologies are opening windows into how normal and pathological brain processes develop at the single cell level. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2019-10-21)

Competitive people are more prone to drug consumption
A Psychology research team at the University of Cordoba (Spain) studied how personality influences substance abuse among young people. (2019-10-16)

National focus on overdose prevention should include alcohol too, study suggests
The need to prevent and rapidly treat opioid overdoses is in the spotlight. But a new study suggests more focus is needed on the risk of alcohol overdoses among people who use opioids of all kinds, and other drugs. Ninety percent of residential recovery center patients surveyed had overdosed on alcohol at least once, and 80 percent of them said that at the time of their overdose, they had also been taking other drugs. (2019-10-11)

A safer way for police to test drug evidence
Scientists have demonstrated a way for police to quickly and safely test whether a baggie or other package contains illegal drugs without having to handle any suspicious contents directly. The new technique can limit the risk of accidental exposure to fentanyl and other highly potent drugs that can be dangerous if a small amount is accidentally inhaled. (2019-09-17)

Brain cells that suppress drug cravings may be the secret to better addiction medicines
Scientists from Scripps Research have shed light on poorly understood brain mechanisms that suppress drug and alcohol cravings, uncovering new insights that may help in the development of better addiction medicines. (2019-09-09)

Chronic cocaine use modifies gene expression
Chronic cocaine use changes gene expression in the hippocampus, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci. (2019-09-02)

What we don't know about prenatal opioid exposure
'Will the baby be OK?' In cases of prenatal opioid exposure, the answer is unclear. As part of a National Institutes of Health initiative to study the effects of a child's environment on his or her life outcomes, University of Utah developmental psychologist Elisabeth Conradt and her colleagues collected and reviewed 52 publications to identify what's known so far about how prenatal opioid exposure affects childhood outcomes and development. (2019-08-28)

Spending on illicit drugs in US nears $150 billion annually
Spending on cannabis, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine fluctuated between $120 billion and $145 billion each year from 2006 to 2016, rivaling what Americans spend each year on alcohol, according to a new study. (2019-08-20)

Coca and conflict: the factors fuelling Colombian deforestation
Deforestation in Colombia has been linked to armed conflict and forests' proximity to coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived. A University of Queensland-led study found that conflict between illegal groups and the governmental military forces, proximity to coca plantations, mining concessions, oil wells and roads were all associated with increased deforestation. (2019-08-13)

Analysis shows large decline in criminal sentencing race gap
Racial and ethnic gaps in criminal sentences have declined, in some cases significantly, since the mid-1990s, a new analysis of state, county and federal data suggests. For example, the overall sentence length gap between whites and blacks in federal courts decreased by more than 80% between 1996 and 2016. (2019-08-13)

Adults who mix cannabis with opioids for pain report higher anxiety, depression
Not a good mix: A researcher from the University of Houston has found that adults who combine prescription opioids for severe pain and cannabis report elevated anxiety and depression symptoms, with no increased pain reduction. (2019-08-12)

Blocking dopamine weakens effects of cocaine
Blocking dopamine receptors in different regions of the amygdala reduces drug seeking and taking behavior with varying longevity, according to research in rats published in eNeuro. (2019-07-29)

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer
American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows. (2019-07-23)

MRI plays a role in diagnosis of cocaine-related damage to the heart
Cardiac MRI has a pivotal role to play in the diagnosis of cocaine-induced cardiovascular diseases, according to a new article. (2019-06-13)

Polysubstance use, social factors associated with opioid overdose deaths
A new study led by Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction shows that opioid-related overdose deaths involving another substance is now the norm, not the exception, in Massachusetts. The researchers analyzed opioid overdose death data from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, which showed that 82 percent of those deaths involved an opioid and another substance, including stimulants. (2019-05-29)

Study may help prevent relapse in cocaine use disorder patients
Brazilian researchers combined cognitive dysfunction tests with an analysis of drug use patterns to identify patients at high risk of relapse after treatment. (2019-05-16)

Ancient ritual bundle contained multiple psychotropic plants
A thousand years ago, Native Americans in South America used multiple psychotropic plants -- possibly simultaneously -- to induce hallucinations and altered consciousness, according to an international team of anthropologists. (2019-05-06)

New study finds river wildlife contain cocaine, pharmaceuticals and pesticides
For the first time, researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with the University of Suffolk, have found a diverse array of chemicals, including illicit drugs and pesticides in UK river wildlife. The study published today in Environment International, looked at the exposure of wildlife, such as the freshwater shrimp Gammarus pulex, to different micropollutants (chemicals found at exceptionally low levels) and the levels of these compounds in the animals. (2019-04-30)

Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories. Their research sheds light on how drug addiction develops and reveals pathways that can be exploited for the development of strategies to treat cocaine addiction. (2019-04-15)

Performance-enhancing drugs may increase risk of teen cocaine abuse, impair fertility
Performance-enhancing steroid use could increase the risk of cocaine use and addiction in teens, according to a new rodent study. The combination of these drugs could also impair fertility in young women. The research will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla. (2019-04-08)

Psychostimulants play a major role in fatal strokes among young adults
An estimated 76 million people use psychostimulants, which include illicit drugs such as methamphetamine, cocaine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, as well as prescription stimulants. A new Journal of Forensic Sciences study from Australia is the first to present national data of psychostimulant use in young adults who experienced a fatal stroke. (2019-04-03)

Team models cocaine trafficking response to counternarcotic efforts
A new computer model offers a much-needed, evidence-based tool to assess different cocaine interception scenarios and predict how drug smugglers react to attempts by authorities to intercept their narcotics. (2019-04-02)

'NarcoLogic' computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction
Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate. (2019-04-02)

Drugs used to enhance sexual experiences, especially in UK
Combining drugs with sex is common regardless of gender or sexual orientation, reveals new research by UCL and the Global Drug Survey into global trends of substance-linked sex. The findings, published today in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, revealed that alcohol, cannabis, MDMA and cocaine are the drugs most commonly combined with sex. (2019-04-01)

Brain research reveals a circuit for cocaine relapse
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have identified which neurons are responsible for cocaine-seeking behaviors in rodents and where these neurons exert their effects within the brain. Their findings were published in March 13, 2019 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This work opens a new line of addiction research that could lead to novel therapeutic approaches for preventing relapse. (2019-03-18)

Heart attacks increasingly common in young adults
Even though fewer heart attacks are occurring in the US -- in large part due to the use of medications like statins and a decline in smoking -- these events are steadily rising in very young adults. New data not only validate this trend but also reveal that more heart attacks are striking those under age 40, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. (2019-03-07)

Menstrual cycle phase influences cocaine craving
Menstrual cycle may influence addiction risk in women, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry by researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse and University of Maryland School of Medicine. (2019-03-05)

University of Guelph researchers uncover why environmental cues make drug addiction extra hard to beat
Besides triggering the brain's emotional and stimulus-response systems, environmental cues activate areas where memories are processed, according to this University of Guelph study. Prompting these memory processing systems makes it extra difficult to counter addiction because the classic stimulus-response mechanisms are reinforced by the memory effects of environmental drug cues. While this double effect makes it hard to treat drug abuse, this finding may offer a way to use cues to improve cognitive behavioural therapy. (2019-02-27)

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