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Current Cocaine News and Events, Cocaine News Articles.
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A gene involved in ADHD could be related to addictive substance use
Some variations in the gene LPHN3-associated with the attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in kids and adults -- could favor likelihood to smoke, consume alcohol, cannabis and other addictive substances, according to an article published in the journal Translational Psychiatry, from the Nature Publishing Group. (2019-02-25)

UK sales of Xanax and other prescription psychiatric drugs increasing via the darknet
Sales of prescription psychiatric drugs such as Xanax and diazepam via darknet online drug markets have increased in the UK at an alarming rate, according to new research by the University of Kent and King's College London. (2019-02-13)

MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users
Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests. (2019-02-08)

Women's hormones play role in drug addiction, higher relapse rates
Female-specific interventions are needed, but in the meantime, treatment centers could use this study to educate women about their stronger mental connections to places and objects. (2019-02-08)

Unexpected results suggest a few joints may not harm men's sperm
Researchers investigating the effect of cannabis smoking on men's testicular function have made the unexpected discovery that it is linked to higher sperm counts and higher testosterone levels among moderate users compared to men who never smoked it. The study is published in Human Reproduction. (2019-02-05)

Erasing memories associated with cocaine use reduces drug seeking behavior
Researchers identified the brain circuits that form memories associating environmental cues with cocaine use. Targeting these memories may improve the success of exposure therapy to prevent relapse. (2019-01-22)

Born to run: just not on cocaine
A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice -- they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn't run around. In other tests, they still found cocaine appealing, but displayed an inability to shake the memory of cocaine's actions when the drug was no longer administered. The key change that blocks cocaine's stimulant effects in these mice is serotonin, not dopamine, which is responsible for producing a high. (2019-01-16)

UTSA uncovers the disconnect between the brain's dopamine system and cocaine addiction
Now new data by UTSA shows how the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine changes when working for cocaine. Our brains naturally release dopamine to reward us for working hard for something gratifying, for example, enjoying a sweet piece of chocolate. Yet when it comes to illicit substances such as cocaine, the harder the effort put into getting cocaine, the less likely there will be a large jolt of dopamine. (2019-01-10)

Urine drug testing may be important in early phases of addiction treatment
A new study performed by Boston Medical Center shows that urine drug testing can be a useful tool to treat patients with opioid use disorder in a primary care setting. (2018-12-20)

Study highlights correlations between violent death and substance use
Consumption of alcohol or at least one drug was associated with over half the violent deaths that occurred in São Paulo City in the period analyzed. (2018-12-07)

Neuroimaging study reveals 'hot spot' for cue-reactivity in substance-dependent population
Medical University of South Carolina neuroscientists have identified a region of brain that may be a new clinical target to treat addiction. In a Translational Psychiatry article, they report locating a 'hot spot' in brain activity associated with substance use disorder that could potentially be targeted by brain stimulation therapies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). These findings have led to a clinical trial of TMS in patients with cocaine and alcohol use disorder. (2018-11-20)

Duke forms prototype of robot dog nose
Every day, thousands of trained K9 dogs sniff out narcotics, explosives and missing people. These dogs are invaluable for security, but they're also expensive. Duke researchers have made the beginning steps toward an artificial 'robot nose' device that officers could use instead of dogs. The heart of the system would be living odor receptors grown from mouse genes that respond to target odors, including the smells of cocaine and explosives. (2018-11-19)

How exercise could help fight drug addiction
The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brain, according to a study in the journal ACS Omega. (2018-11-14)

Moving the motivation meter
Rats given the drug that reduced dopamine were much less likely to work for preferred morsels of food. But when these rats were then given one of the experimental drugs, they regained their motivation to work for the treat. (2018-11-08)

Ohio researchers, partners find meth, similar drug overdoses growing rapidly
The number of overdose deaths involving methamphetamines and amphetamines in the state of Ohio increased more than 5,000 percent over the course of eight years, according to data collected by the Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health. (2018-11-06)

Cocaine-fentanyl overdoses underscore need for more 'test strips' and rapid response
Penn Medicine emergency department physicians are calling for more readily available testing strips to identify the presence of fentanyl in patients experiencing a drug overdose, and a rapid, coordinated response among health care providers and city agencies to help curb overdoses and identify high potency high risk drugs. (2018-11-01)

Cocaine adulterant may cause brain damage
People who regularly take cocaine cut with the animal anti-worming agent levamisole demonstrate impaired cognitive performance and a thinned prefrontal cortex. These findings from two recent studies at the University of Zurich indicate that levamisole could have a toxic effect on the brain. Drug-checking programs should therefore be expanded, argue the researchers. (2018-10-31)

Fentanyl test strips prove useful in preventing overdoses
A Brown University study found that many young adults who tried fentanyl test strips reduced overdose risk by using less, going slower or using with someone else present. (2018-10-18)

Fingerprint drug screen test works on the living and deceased
A revolutionary drug test can detect amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine and opiates from the sweat of single fingerprint sample in just 10 minutes. The research shows that the technology works on both the living and deceased. (2018-10-08)

New protocol for measuring background levels of drugs in crime labs
When forensic chemists handle evidence that contains illegal drugs, trace amounts are inevitably released into the laboratory environment, which can cause detectable background levels of drugs in the lab. Why is this a problem? 'If I run a sample and it has fentanyl, I want to be sure that fentanyl came from the sample and not from background levels in my lab,' said NIST research chemist Ed Sisco, the lead author of the study. (2018-09-26)

Drug overdose epidemic has been growing exponentially for decades
Death rates from drug overdoses in the US have been on an exponential growth curve that began at least 15 years before the mid-1990s surge in opioid prescribing, suggesting that overdose death rates may continue along this same historical growth trajectory for years to come. These findings suggest that, to be successful, prevention efforts must extend beyond control of specific drugs to address deeper factors driving the epidemic. (2018-09-20)

Gene therapy via skin protects mice from lethal cocaine doses
A study in Nature Biomedical Engineering shows that skin stem cells, modified via CRISPR and transplanted back to donor mice, can protect addicted mice from cocaine-seeking and overdose. (2018-09-17)

Cocaine addiction traced to increase in number of orexin neurons
A study in cocaine-addicted rats reports long-lasting increases in the number of neurons that produce orexin -- a chemical messenger important for sleep and appetite -- that may be at the root of the addiction. The study, performed by researchers at Rutgers University, New Jersey, was published in Biological Psychiatry. Restoring the number of orexin neurons to normal, or blocking orexin signaling in the brain, made the rats no longer addicted. (2018-09-12)

Quest Diagnostics health trends study finds drug misuse rates remain constant at high levels and...
More than half of Americans tested misused their prescription drugs in 2017. Among patients in general care, use of non-prescribed medications and illicit drugs declined, but is still prevalent. Among patients in treatment for substance use disorder (SUD), misuse of heroin and prescription fentanyl surged nearly 400 percent; among patients testing positive for heroin, the rate of mixing with fentanyl nearly doubled. Drug mixing is the most frequent form of misuse. (2018-09-06)

Research suggests increased cortical activation in cannabis users' brains in resting state
Recent research from the Center for BrainHealth® at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that cannabis users experience increased cortical activation during the brain's resting state when compared with nonusers. The resulting 'noisy brain' might impair brain activity and disrupt cognitive processes, said Dr. Shikha Prashad, the study's lead author and a research scientist at the Center for BrainHealth. (2018-09-05)

Investigators find that bile acids reduce cocaine reward
Bile acids -- gut compounds that aid in the digestion of dietary fats -- reduce the desire for cocaine, according to a new study by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2018-08-31)

The use of psychoactive substances and illegal drugs in the Albanian society
The aim of the research is to create a representative picture of the prevalence and the total number of drug users in Albania from 2012 to 2016, and compare those numbers to previous years with other available data. (2018-08-30)

Bifunctional compound tackles pain relief and opioid dependency
Huiping Ding and colleagues have developed a painkilling compound that both relieves pain and suppresses opioid dependency in primates. (2018-08-29)

CU researchers identify potential target for treating pain during surgery
A research team lead by faculty of the University of Colorado School of Medicine have published a study that improves the understanding of the pain-sensing neurons that respond to tissue injury during surgery. (2018-08-28)

Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events
America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

Study finds racial disparities in prescribing opioids for chronic pain
Yale researchers have identified racial disparities in the treatment of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain. Black patients who receive opioids long-term are more likely than whites to be tested for illicit drug use. Of those who test positive, blacks are more likely to have their opioid prescriptions discontinued, said the researchers. (2018-08-20)

SMURF1 provides targeted approach to preventing cocaine addiction relapse
A class of proteins that has generated significant interest for its potential to treat diseases, has for the first time, been shown to be effective in reducing relapse, or drug-seeking behaviors, in a preclinical study. (2018-08-14)

Study examines for risk factors associated with initiation of substance use
Not all individuals who initiate use of a substance such as nicotine, alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine eventually develop a substance use disorder, indicating that the risk factors for substance use and for substance use disorder (SUD) differ to some extent. A new study has evaluated the overlap in risk factors for substance initiation and SUD, which may be useful for developing interventions to reduce both initiation and SUD. The findings are published in The American Journal on Addictions. (2018-08-08)

Exercise can help beat cocaine addiction, study finds
Exercise can help prevent relapses into cocaine addiction, according to new research led by the University at Buffalo. (2018-08-08)

Cocaine relapse is reversed with BDNF microinjections in the brain
Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina discover that brain-derived neurotropic factor reduced cocaine relapse in a preclinical model when administered before a cue-induced relapse event, as reported in Addiction Biology. (2018-08-03)

Bile acids from the gut could help to treat cocaine abuse
Bile acids that aid fat digestion are also found to reduce the rewarding properties of cocaine use, according to a study publishing on July 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by India Reddy, Nicholas Smith, and Robb Flynn of Vanderbilt University, Aurelio Galli of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues. (2018-07-26)

Researchers find that hunger hormones offer promising avenue for addiction treatment
Hormones that signal the body's state of hunger and fullness could be the key to new treatments for drug and alcohol addiction. That is the consensus of an expert panel convened this week at the annual meeting of the Society for the Study Ingestive Behavior, the leading international research conference on food and fluid intake. Gut hormones have received considerable attention from scientists seeking to understand overeating and obesity, which led the panelists to discover that those hormones are also involved in addiction. (2018-07-17)

Childhood adversity increases susceptibility to addiction via immune response
Childhood adversity permanently alters the peripheral and central immune systems, increasing the sensitivity of the body's immune response to cocaine, reports a study by researchers at the IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation and University of Rome 'La Sapienza', Italy. (2018-07-17)

A gene required for addictive behavior
Cocaine can have a devastating effect on people. It directly stimulates the brain's reward center, and, more importantly, induces long-term changes to the reward circuitry that are responsible for addictive behaviors. Alban de Kerchove d'Exaerde from the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium, and his colleagues have now uncovered that a gene called Maged1 plays a crucial role in controlling these pathological changes. This finding was published today in EMBO Reports. (2018-07-12)

LGBQ teens more likely than peers to use dangerous drugs
Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study led by San Diego State University researchers and published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2018-07-12)

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