Current Cochlear Implants News and Events

Current Cochlear Implants News and Events, Cochlear Implants News Articles.
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Exposure to spoken communication in children with cochlear implants during COVID-19 lockdown
This study examined how lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic changed the spoken communication environments of children with cochlear implants by comparing the sounds they were exposed to before and during the resulting closures of schools and nonessential businesses. (2021-02-18)

Hospital hygiene: A closer look reveals realistic frequency of infection
A research team led by Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern found a correlation between the frequency of infections after surgery and performance in quality audits. Lower surgical site infection rates correlate with a lower audit score. In other words, looking more closely reveals more reported infections. Recommendations for possible correction are presented. (2021-02-18)

Sweet coating for sour bones
Scientists invent a bioactive coating to improve the function of titanium implants in osteoporotic bones. This coating, comprising a chemically-modified glycan, can sequentially turn on and off inflammation on titanium surface upon implantation. This modulation stimulates the body's immune system to promote bone healing in an effective and safe way, without addition of bone-forming genes or drugs, according to the data from a rat osteoporotic model. (2021-02-12)

Study suggests sounds influence the developing brain earlier than previously thought
In experiments in newborn mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins report that sounds appear to change ''wiring'' patterns in areas of the brain that process sound earlier than scientists assumed and even before the ear canal opens. (2021-02-12)

Implant improves balance, movement and quality of life for people with inner ear disorder
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have shown that they can facilitate walking, relieve dizziness and improve quality of life in patients with BVH by surgically implanting a stimulator that electrically bypasses malfunctioning areas of the inner ear and partially restores the sensation of balance. (2021-02-11)

Reimbursing hospitals for postpartum contraception could prevent unintended pregnancies
Researchers at Brown found that expanding access to long-acting reversible contraception methods, such as IUDs and implants, could give adolescents more agency in choosing whether and when to become pregnant again. (2021-02-09)

3D-printed bioresorbable airway stent
An ETH Zurich research team is using 3D printing to produce a new type of bioresorbable airway stent. This could greatly simplify the future treatment of upper airway obstruction. (2021-02-03)

Wirelessly rechargeable soft brain implant controls brain cells
Researchers have invented a smartphone-controlled soft brain implant that can be recharged wirelessly from outside the body. It enables long-term neural circuit manipulation without the need for periodic disruptive surgeries to replace the battery of the implant. Scientists believe this technology can help uncover and treat psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as addiction, depression, and Parkinson's. (2021-01-26)

3-D printed Biomesh minimizes hernia repair complications
A newly-designed 3D-printed Biomesh effectively minimized postsurgical complications of hernia repair in an animal model. (2021-01-25)

Speech recognition changes after cochlear implant
Researchers compared changes in preoperative aided speech recognition with postoperative speech recognition among individuals who received cochlear implants. (2021-01-07)

The latest magnesium studies pave the way for new biomedical materials
Materials used in biomedicine must be characterized by controlled biodegradability, sufficient strength and total absence of toxicity to the human body. The search for such materials is, therefore, not a simple task. In this context, scientists have been interested in magnesium for a long time. Recently, using such techniques as positron annihilation spectroscopy, the researchers were able to demonstrate that magnesium subjected to surface mechanical attrition treatment obtains the properties necessary for a biocompatible material. (2020-12-17)

Hydrogels with fine-toothed molecular combs may make enduring glucose-monitoring implants
In a new study, published online in the journal American Chemical Society (ACS) Applied Polymer Materials, scientists at Texas A&M University reported they have designed a hydrogel membrane that may be used to house optical glucose sensing materials, toward building a biosensor for monitoring sugar levels in diabetics. (2020-12-09)

Restoring a rudimentary form of vision in the blind
Restoration of vision in blind people through a brain implant is on the verge of becoming reality. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced shapes and percepts. The findings were published in Science on 3 December. (2020-12-03)

Human Brain Project-supported innovation published in Science
Human Brain Project research has helped lay the foundation for a brain implant that could one day give blind people their sight back. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that in monkeys, newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced images. The findings were published in Science on 3 December. For further development towards application in humans, the high-resolution 3D digital brain atlases of HBP's EBRAINS Research Infrastructure will become instrumental. (2020-12-03)

Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors
Researchers from Bochum, Göttingen, Duisburg and Cologne have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections. They use fluorescent nanosensors to track down pathogens faster and more easily than with established methods. A team headed by Professor Sebastian Kruß, formerly at Universität Göttingen, now at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), describes the results in the journal Nature Communications, published online on 25 November 2020. (2020-11-30)

New process narrows the gap between natural and synthetic materials
Skin and cartilage are both strong and flexible - properties that are hard to replicate in artificial materials. But a new fabrication process, developed by scientists at EPFL, brings lifelike synthetic polymers a step closer. (2020-11-19)

Dentists from RUDN University found a reason for early deterioration of dental implants
A team of dentists from RUDN University confirmed that a change in the dominant side of chewing is a reason for the early deterioration of dental implants. Such a change makes it more difficult for a patient to get accustomed to an implant and can lead to bone tissue abnormalities. The discovery can help dentists plan the recovery process after implantation surgeries. (2020-11-18)

Skoltech scientists developed a novel bone implant manufacturing method
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Design, Manufacturing, and Materials (CDMM) have developed a method for designing and manufacturing complex-shaped ceramic bone implants with a controllable porous structure, which largely enhances tissue fusion efficiency. Specimens of designed ceramic implants were fabricated at a 3D printer. This method enables changing the porous structure so as to produce implants of different densities to accommodate the patients' individual needs. (2020-11-12)

Studies outline key ethical questions surrounding brain-computer interface tech
Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies are no longer hypothetical, yet there are fundamental aspects of the technology that remain unaddressed by both ethicists and policy-makers. Two new papers address these issues by outlining the outstanding ethical issues, offering guidance for addressing those issues, and offering particular insight into the field of BCI tech for cognitive enhancement. (2020-11-10)

Researchers 3D print biomedical parts with supersonic speed
Forget glue, screws, heat or other traditional bonding methods. A Cornell University-led collaboration has developed a 3D printing technique that creates cellular metallic materials by smashing together powder particles at supersonic speed. (2020-11-10)

Coating implants with 'artificial bone' to prevent inflammation
Bone disease is becoming increasingly prevalence in modern society due to population aging among other factors, and the use of dental and orthopedic implants to treat bone disease has been on the rise. To mitigate slow integration into the bone, Korean research team have developed a ceramic artificial bone coating with triple the adhesion strength compared to conventional coating materials. (2020-10-23)

Boron nitride nanofilms for protection from bacterial and fungal infections
NUST MISIS material scientists have presented antibacterial nano-coatings based on boron nitride, which are highly effective against microbial pathogens (up to 99.99%). They can become a safe alternative to the usual antibiotics in implantology since they do not have typical negative side effects. The results of the work are published in the international scientific journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-10-20)

University of Sydney research could lead to customised cochlear implants
A School of Biomedical Engineering researcher has analysed the accuracy of predictions for cochlear implant outcomes, with a view to further improve their performance in noisy environments. (2020-10-19)

Tissue grafts of both bone and cartilage could regenerate damage to a crucial jaw joint
Scientists have engineered tissue grafts that, in pigs, regenerated both bone and cartilage in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), a part of the jaw that can cause debilitating pain and disability when damaged. (2020-10-14)

Coupling antibiotics with stem cells to fight off bone infections
Researchers from Kanazawa University investigated the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) loaded with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on osteomyelitis caused by implants. By administering ADSC-loaded ciprofloxacin to the site of bone infection in rats, the researchers found a significant improvement of the infection, as shown by reduced soft tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone degradation. These findings suggest a potential new therapy for implant-related bone infections that have traditionally been difficult to treat with antibiotics. (2020-10-01)

Flexible and biodegradable electronic blood vessels
Researchers in China and Switzerland have developed electronic blood vessels that can be actively tuned to address subtle changes in the body after implantation. The blood vessels--made of a metal-polymer conductor membrane that's flexible and biodegradable--mimic natural blood vessels, were conductive in in vitro experiments, and were able to effectively replace key arteries in rabbits. The research appears October 1 in the journal Matter. (2020-10-01)

Spinal injuries: the recovery of motor skills thanks to nanomaterials
Re-establishing motor skills and neuronal connectivity thanks to the implantation of carbon nanotubes in the injury site. This is the result of a study conducted by SISSA and the University of Trieste and published in PNAS. For the first time, the researchers have used nanomaterial implants in animals with spinal injury, showing the potential of therapeutic approaches that use the mechanical and electric properties of regenerative scaffolds to treat the injured area. (2020-09-28)

New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said. (2020-09-24)

Technology for printing customized neuroprostheses on a 3D bioprinter
Researchers from St Petersburg University have developed the NeuroPrint soft neuroprosthesis 3D printing technology. In the long term, this can help paralyzed people after spinal cord injury. The new development has already shown its effectiveness in studies on mammals and zebrafish. (2020-09-23)

Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
The eyes of the fruit fly are covered by a thin and transparent coating with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties. Researchers from the University of Geneva and Lausanne discovered that the coating only consists of two ingredients: retinin and corneal wax. They succeeded in artificially reproducing the phenomenon on different kinds of surface. This process, which is very inexpensive and is based on biodegradable materials, could have numerous applications for contact lenses, medical implants and textiles. (2020-09-16)

Real neurons are noisy. Can neural implants figure that out?
Signals sent from the retina to the brain have a lot of background noise, yet we see the world clearly. Duke researchers show that to achieve visual clarity the brain must accurately measure how this noise is distributed across neurons when processing the signals sent down the optic nerve. These results are likely to shape the design of future retinal prosthetics and other brain-machine interfaces. (2020-09-15)

Oxygen-releasing bioink for 3D bioprinting
Newly developed bioink enhances the ability of implanted cells to grow and regenerate new tissue (2020-09-09)

Hearing loss in naked mole-rats is an advantage, not a hardship
With six mutations in genes associated with hearing, naked mole-rats can barely hear the constant squeaking they use to communicate with one another. This hearing loss, which is strange for such social, vocal animals, is an adaptive, beneficial trait, according to new findings published in the journal Current Biology. (2020-09-03)

Implant choice more important than surgeon skill for hip replacement success
A study analysing over 650,000 hip replacement patients across England and Wales over 14 years sought to investigate why one hospital has consistently been identified as having better than expected outcomes compared to other settings. The findings have shown that the outstanding hip implant survival results seen in one centre in the UK are associated with implant choice more than surgeon skill. (2020-08-31)

New study examines long-term aesthetic outcomes of implant-based breast reconstruction
Breast reconstruction is an important option for women undergoing mastectomy, and a two-stage approach using implants is by far the most common reconstruction technique. Thousands of women undergo this procedure every year - despite the conventional wisdom among many surgeons that the results of implant-based breast reconstruction don't hold up over the long term. (2020-08-28)

Preventing infection, facilitating healing: New biomaterials from spider silk
New biomaterials developed at the University of Bayreuth eliminate risk of infection and facilitate healing processes. These nanostructured materials are based on spider silk proteins. They prevent colonization by bacteria and fungi, but at the same time proactively assist in the regeneration of human tissue. They are therefore ideal for implants, wound dressings, prostheses, contact lenses, and other everyday aids. (2020-08-28)

Cochlear implants should be recommended for adults more often
An international group of hearing specialists has released a new set of recommendations emphasizing that cochlear implants should be offered to adults who have moderate to severe or worse hearing loss much more often than is the current practice. The group hopes the recommendations help increase usage of such devices, potentially improving hearing and quality of life for millions worldwide. (2020-08-27)

Shoulder replacements benefit most patients for more than ten years, study shows
The The Lancet Rheumatology study examined data on nearly 18,000 people who have had shoulder replacements. The team found that at ten years, more than 90 per cent of shoulder replacements were still working well, and that patients continued to report that the operation had benefitted them. (2020-08-26)

No limit yet for carbon nanotube fibers
Rice University researchers report advances in their quest to make the best carbon nanotube fibers for industry. (2020-08-17)

Long-term risks of joint implants
Using highly complex analytical techniques, a group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to observe in detail how different metals are released from joint implants and accumulate in the surrounding bone tissue. Findings showed a steady release of metals from various implant components. In contrast to previous assumptions, this was not related to the degree of mechanical stress involved. (2020-08-11)

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