Current Cockroaches News and Events

Current Cockroaches News and Events, Cockroaches News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 5 | 184 Results
Food allergies are more common among Black children
Black children have significantly higher rates of shellfish and fish allergies than White children, in addition to having higher odds of wheat allergy, suggesting that race may play an important role in how children are affected by food allergies, researchers at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Rush University Medical Center and two other hospitals have found. (2021-02-04)

Race plays a role in children's food allergies
Black children have significantly higher rates of shellfish and fish allergies than white children, confirming that race plays an important role in how children are affected by food allergies, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found. (2021-01-26)

Neuropeptide discoveries could someday help defeat the dreaded cockroach
Cockroaches are notorious for their abilities to survive and reproduce, much to humanity's chagrin. In addition to scurrying around at night, feeding on human and pet food, and generating an offensive odor, the pests can transmit pathogens and cause allergic reactions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research have identified neuropeptides produced by the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) that could someday be targeted by new, more selective and effective pesticides. (2020-12-09)

Cockroach mating habits and developmental features help uncover insect evolution
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba examined the mating habits of an often-overlooked cockroach family, Nocticolidae, to provide clues about insect evolution. Although the studied cockroaches displayed novel wing-flapping behavior prior to copulation, similarities in other mating habits, egg sac handling, and embryonic development between Nocticolidae and sister family Corydiidae suggested that the two groups share a common ancestor. Elucidating these relationships will help infer the evolutionary history of modern-day insects. (2020-11-05)

Cockroaches and lizards inspire new robot developed by Ben-Gurion University researcher
'The AmphiSTAR uses a sprawling mechanism inspired by cockroaches, and it is designed to run on water at high speeds like the basilisk lizard,' says Ben-Gurion University Prof. Zarrouk. 'We envision that AmphiSTAR can be used for agricultural, search and rescue and excavation applications, where both crawling and swimming are required.' (2020-11-02)

Salute the venerable ensign wasp, killing cockroaches for 25 million years
An Oregon State University study has identified four new species of parasitic, cockroach-killing ensign wasps that became encased in tree resin 25 million years ago and were preserved as the resin fossilized into amber. (2020-09-28)

How social media platforms can contribute to dehumanizing people
A recent analysis of discourse on Facebook highlights how social media can be used to dehumanize entire groups of people. (2020-05-20)

Why do men -- and other male animals -- tend to die younger? It's all in the Y chromosome
Males of most animal species die earlier than females because their smaller Y chromosome is unable to protect an unhealthy X chromosome, research suggests. (2020-03-03)

Reducing mouse allergens may improve lung growth in asthmatic children
Lowering exposure to allergens from mice may lead to improved lung growth for children with asthma living in low-income neighborhoods, helping them avoid lung ailments and possibly live longer, according to newly published research in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (2019-12-19)

Scurrying roaches help researchers steady staggering robots
To walk or run with finesse, roaches and robots coordinate leg movements via signals sent through centralized systems. Though their moving parts are utterly divergent, researchers have devised handy principles and equations to assess how both beasts and bots locomote and to improve robotic gait. (2019-08-22)

Neurocognitive basis for free will set out for the first time
Do human beings genuinely have free will? Philosophers and theologians have wrestled with this question for centuries and have set out the 'design features' of free will -- but how do our brains actually fulfil them? Thomas Hills, Professor of Psychology at the University of Warwick, has answered this question for the first time in a new paper published today [31] in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. (2019-07-31)

Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common household cockroach
The Turkestan cockroach (commonly known as the red runner roach or rusty red roach), which is popular as food for pet reptiles, has an interneuron extremely sensitive to sex pheromones emitted by American cockroaches, providing evidence that the Turkestan cockroach is phylogenetically close to the American cockroach and the smoky brown cockroach belonging to the genus Periplaneta. (2019-07-19)

Coastal organisms trapped in 99-million-year-old amber
Most amber inclusions are organisms that lived in the forest. It is very rare to find sea life trapped in amber. However, an international research group led by Professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) reported the first known ammonite trapped in amber. (2019-05-13)

Face off -- Cyclists not human enough for drivers: study
A new Australian study has found that more than half of car drivers think cyclists are not completely human, with a link between the dehumanisation of bike riders and acts of deliberate aggression towards them on the road. (2019-03-26)

Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of 2 species of ancient reptile
Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws. (2019-02-25)

'Bug bombs' are ineffective killing roaches indoors
Total release foggers, commonly known as 'bug bombs,' are ineffective at removing cockroaches from indoor environments, according to a new study from North Carolina State University. Bug-bomb chemicals fail to reach places where cockroaches congregate the most -- on the underside of surfaces and inside cabinets, NC State researchers say. Besides leaving behind numerous cockroaches, bug bombs also leave behind nasty toxic residue in the middle of floors and countertops. (2019-01-27)

NUS study explains how a spider and a pitcher plant can benefit from collaboration
Two recent studies by ecologists from the National University of Singapore have shed light on the relationship between the slender pitcher plant and its 'tenant', the crab spider Thomisus nepenthiphilus, providing insights to the little known foraging behaviours of the spider. (2018-11-11)

Home cleanliness, residents' tolerance predict where cockroaches take up residence
Poor home sanitation and residents' tolerance regarding German cockroaches were a good predictor of the pest's presence in their apartments, according to a Rutgers study in Paterson and Irvington, New Jersey. (2018-11-07)

Karate kicks keep cockroaches from becoming zombies, wasp chow
Far from being a weak-willed sap easily paralyzed by the emerald jewel wasp's sting to the brain -- followed by becoming a placid egg carrier and then larvae chow -- the cockroach can deliver a stunning karate kick that saves its life. (2018-10-31)

A cyborg cockroach could someday save your life
A tiny neuro-controller created by researchers at the University of Connecticut could provide more precise control of futuristic biobots such as cyborg cockroaches that are already being tested for use in search and rescue missions inside collapsed buildings. (2018-09-06)

Next-generation robotic cockroach can explore under water environments
In nature, cockroaches can survive underwater for up to 30 minutes. Now, a robotic cockroach can do even better. Harvard's Ambulatory Microrobot, known as HAMR, can walk on land, swim on the surface of water, and walk underwater for as long as necessary, opening up new environments for this little bot to explore. (2018-07-02)

Insect toxin detected in the world's longest animal
The longest animal in the world, the bootlace worm, which can be up to 55 metres long, produces neurotoxins that can kill both crabs and cockroaches. This has been shown in a new study conducted by researchers at Uppsala University, Linnaeus University and the Swedish Species Information Centre at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. The study was published in Scientific Reports, March 22. The toxins could be used for example in agricultural insecticides. (2018-03-26)

How allergens trigger asthma attacks
A team of Inserm and CNRS researchers from the Institute of Pharmacology and Structural Biology -- or IPBS -- have identified a protein that acts like a sensor detecting various allergens in the respiratory tract responsible for asthma attacks. Their study, codirected by Corinne Cayrol and Jean-Philippe Girard, is published in Nature Immunology on March 19, 2018. These scientists' work offers hope for breakthroughs in the treatment of allergic diseases. (2018-03-19)

Study shows improving pediatric asthma care is possible
New study findings published in the March issue of Hospital Pediatrics shows improved personalized inpatient assessments can enhance the accuracy of the prescribed asthma therapy a child receives. A physician's asking of the six key asthma control questions can help. (2018-03-02)

Spatial perception of odorants in cockroaches
A recent study involving researchers from the University of Konstanz has described the first neural architecture capable of encoding the spatial location of odorants. (2018-02-19)

Can a cockroach teach a robot how to scurry across rugged terrain?
Researchers build a robot that moves more like a cockroach. (2018-02-13)

Sniffing out a mate with precision
Male cockroaches can 'see' the spatial distribution of female pheromones to locate a sexual mate, according to researchers from Hokkaido University and the University of Konstanz. (2018-02-08)

Mind-controlling molecules from wasp venom could someday help Parkinson's patients
After being stung by a parasitic wasp, the American cockroach loses control of its behavior, becoming host to the wasp's egg. Days later, the hatchling consumes the cockroach alive. While this is a gruesome process for the cockroach, scientists now report in ACS' journal Biochemistry the discovery of a new family of peptides in the wasp's venom that could be key to controlling roach minds, and might even help researchers develop better Parkinson's disease treatments. (2018-02-07)

The social evolution of termites
Similar genes involved in the evolution of insect societies as in bees and ants. (2018-02-07)

Cockroach ancient geographic and genomic history traced back to last supercontinent
Armed with a vast amount of genomic information, a team of researchers led by Dr. Thomas Bourguignon, now professor at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, has performed the first molecular dating to gain the clearest picture yet of the biogeographical history of cockroaches. They have traced back the key evolutionary time points of the cockroach -- all the way back almost 300 million years ago when the Earth's mass was organized into the Pangaea supercontinent. (2018-02-06)

Insect communication
Communication is the theme of the 2017 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, broadcast next week on the BBC. First delivered by Michael Faraday in 1825, the family-friendly, experiment-led lectures have been broadcast every year since 1966. During this year's series of three hour-long shows on (2017-12-21)

Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk
A study scientists from the University of Cologne have published in Frontiers in Zoology shows for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop. These new insights could contribute to making the locomotion of robots more energy efficient. (2017-12-08)

Refining pesticides to kill pests, not bees
Researchers at Michigan State University's entomology department have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide's effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. The study, featured in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that molecular tweaks can make the difference. (2017-11-21)

Antibiotics and biocidal cleaners may spread multidrug resistance in MRSA
Antibiotic use on people or pets, and use of biocidal cleaning products such as bleach, are associated with multidrug resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the home. This contamination of the home environment may contribute to reinfection of both humans and animals with MRSA, and to subsequent failure of treatment. The research is published Sept. 22 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2017-09-22)

Cockroach gardeners: Spreading plant seeds across the forest floor
Researchers in Japan have discovered that cockroaches can disperse seeds like birds and mammals. A variety of seed dispersing animals had been identified, including birds, monkeys, ants, and even slugs, but no cockroaches. This unexpected discovery was made during a study of the seed dispersal mechanism of Monotropastrum humile, a small herb that thrives in the same temperate forests of Japan that the Blattella nipponica cockroach inhabits. (2017-08-02)

Pregnancy loss and the evolution of sex are linked by cellular line dance
In new research published this week (Aug. 1, 2017) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Levitis and his collaborators report that meiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring. And not just for humans. Creatures from geckos to garlic and cactuses to cockroaches pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction. (2017-08-01)

'Weedy' fish species to take over our future oceans
University of Adelaide researchers have for the first time demonstrated that the ocean acidification expected in the future will reduce fish diversity significantly, with small 'weedy' species dominating marine environments. (2017-07-06)

Clues as to why cockroaches are so prolific
Asexual reproduction increases when female cockroaches are housed as a group, not alone, enabling them to maintain a colony for at least three years without a male's contribution. (2017-04-19)

Tracking the movement of cyborg cockroaches
New research offers insights into how far and how fast cyborg cockroaches -- or biobots -- move when exploring new spaces. The work moves researchers closer to their goal of using biobots to explore collapsed buildings and other spaces in order to identify survivors. (2017-02-27)

Bait knocks out cockroaches -- and asthma symptom days
In homes of children sensitized and exposed to cockroaches, a single intervention -- the strategic placement of insecticidal bait -- results in eradication of cockroaches and improved asthma outcomes for children. (2017-01-17)

Page 1 of 5 | 184 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.