Current Coe News and Events

Current Coe News and Events, Coe News Articles.
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Fish diet heats up marine biodiversity hotspot
A never-before-seen biodiversity pattern of coral reef fishes suggests some fishes might be exceptionally vulnerable to environmental change. It highlights, for the first time, a unique link between the diet and distribution of species across the marine realm. (2021-02-17)

Much to glean when times are rough
Stable seafood consumption amongst the world's poorer coastal communities depends on their local habitat characteristics, which influences how they fish at different times of the year. (2021-02-01)

Future too warm for baby sharks
As climate change causes the world's oceans to warm, baby sharks are born smaller, exhausted, undernourished and into environments that are already difficult for them to survive in. (2021-01-12)

Entangling electrons with heat
Quantum entanglement is key for next-generation computing and communications technology, Aalto researchers can now produce it using temperature differences. (2021-01-08)

Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
The coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify. The rate of erosion of calcium carbonate on coral reefs will overtake the rate of accretion on the majority of present-day reefs by the end of the century. (2020-12-03)

Genes unlock clues to the evolution and survival of the Great Barrier Reef
Innovative molecular techniques explain how corals on the east coast of Australia survived previous tough conditions--enabling the Great Barrier Reef to become the vast reef it is today. Scientists mapped the rise and fall of two coral populations on the reef, tracking which genes rapidly evolved to endure changing conditions, while measuring the flow of genes between locations. (2020-11-27)

Chili-shaped device could reveal just how hot that pepper is
Some people love spicy food -- the hotter, the better. Others go out of their way to avoid the palate-singeing burn of capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick. Now, researchers have developed a portable device (whimsically shaped like a chili pepper) that can reveal how much capsaicin a pepper contains, before biting into it. They report their results in ACS Applied Nano Materials. (2020-10-21)

The Great Barrier Reef has lost half its corals
Populations of corals on the Great Barrier Reef have halved in the past three decades - in both shallow and deeper water, and across virtually all species - especially branching and table-shaped corals. These were the worst affected by record-breaking temperatures that triggered mass bleaching in 2016 and 2017. And the Great Barrier Reef was hit with mass bleaching again only a few months ago. (2020-10-13)

Clashing medications put older adults at risk but many haven't had a pharmacist check them
Two-thirds of older adults rely on at least two prescription drugs, and many take over-the-counter medicines and supplements as well. Some of those pills, capsules and tablets may interact with one another in ways that could put them at risk. But a new poll shows that most people over 50 haven't connected with a pharmacist to check for potential clashes among all the things they take, or the potential to save money on them. (2020-10-07)

'Portfolio' of marine reserves enhances fish populations
No-take fishing zones on their own act as valuable sources of fish for neighbouring reefs. These areas support more fish, which then produce even greater numbers of baby fish. But, just how many babies survive and where they end up varies greatly from year to year. Multiple smaller reserves instead of one large reserve can ensure a stable supply of fish. (2020-09-28)

Project Phoenix: DNA unlocks a new understanding of coral
A new study challenges more than 200 years of coral classification. Researchers say the 'traditional' method does not accurately capture the differences between species or their evolutionary relationships. They developed a new genetic tool to help better understand and ultimately work to save coral reefs. (2020-09-14)

Nutrients make coral bleaching worse
Nutrients can aggravate the already negative effects of climate change on corals to trigger mass coral bleaching. A study suggests ecosystem managers can reduce the impacts of coral bleaching by implementing strategies to reduce nutrient stress in areas subject to thermal stress. (2020-08-21)

Declining US plant breeding programs impacts food security
Decreasing access to funding, technology, and knowledge in U.S. plant breeding programs could negatively impact our future food security. (2020-08-20)

How people and ecosystems fit together on the Great Barrier Reef
A world-first study examines the scales of management of the Great Barrier Reef. The findings have the potential to help sustain other ecosystems across the world. The study provides a new approach for diagnosing social-ecological scale mismatches and responding to them. (2020-08-14)

Personal connections key to climate adaptation
Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods. The research found people are more empowered to deal with the impact of encroaching sea-levels and dwindling fish stocks when they see others doing the same. (2020-08-10)

Decline in plant breeding programs could impact food security
A team of scientists led by Kate Evans, a Washington State University horticulture professor who leads WSU's pome fruit (apples and pears) breeding program, found that public plant breeding programs are seeing decreases in funding and personnel. (2020-08-07)

Life in the shallows becomes a trap for baby sharks
Baby reef sharks tolerate living in the sometimes-extreme environments of their nurseries -- but these habitats face an uncertain future which may leave newborn sharks 'trapped'. (2020-07-21)

How governments resist World Heritage 'in Danger' listings
Some national governments repeatedly resist the placement of 41 UNESCO World Heritage sites on the World Heritage in Danger list. This resistance is despite the sites being just as threatened, or more threatened, than those already on the in Danger list. (2020-07-20)

Bleaching affects aquarium corals, too
A world-first study examines the temperature thresholds of Australian aquarium corals and finds they are at risk under climate change. (2020-06-29)

Fluid mechanics mystery solved
An environmental engineering professor has solved a decades-old mystery regarding the behavior of fluids, a field of study with widespread medical, industrial and environmental applications. (2020-06-10)

Big vegetarians of the reef drive fish evolution
New research finds fish diets, not geography, dictate how fast species evolve. (2020-06-01)

Traffic pollution drops in lockdown -- but other risks revealed by Manchester experts
Traffic pollution for most parts of the UK is plummeting thanks to the COVID-19 lockdown but more urban ozone -- a dangerous air pollutant which can cause airway inflammation in humans -- is probably being generated, say experts from The University of Manchester. Observations in cities across the UK show marked decreases in nitrogen oxides but with corresponding increases in ozone during lockdown. (2020-05-07)

Can coral reefs 'have it all'?
A new study outlines how strategic placement of no-fishing marine reserves can help coral reef fish communities thrive. (2020-04-16)

Climate change triggers Great Barrier Reef bleaching
The Great Barrier Reef is suffering through its worst bleaching event. This is the third bleaching within the space of five years. (2020-04-07)

Heatwaves risky for fish
A world-first study using sophisticated genetic analysis techniques have found that some fish are better than others at coping with heatwaves. The study tracks wild fish populations during a severe marine heatwave that killed a third of the Great Barrier Reef corals. (2020-03-18)

Coral 'helper' stays robust under ocean acidification
A type of algae crucial to the survival of coral reefs may be able to resist the impacts of ocean acidification caused by climate change. In a world-first, scientists discover coralline algae are able to build tolerance over multiple generations. (2020-01-21)

Imprinted color patterns
Structural colors appear because the imprinted pattern on a surface changes the wavelengths of light. Chinese scientists have introduced an azopolymer that allows the imprinting of nanopatterns in a novel room-temperature lithographic process. A key aspect of the technique is the light-induced phase change of a novel azopolymer, explains the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The process relies solely on light regulation and allows nanoimprinting even on flexible substrates. (2020-01-15)

Corals survive to tell the tale of Earth's newest island eruption
Coral reefs on a tiny island in the South Pacific have shown incredible resilience and recovery from a recent but very severe disturbance: a volcanic eruption that created a new island. (2019-12-08)

Finding Nemo's family: a good home is more important than good genes
The reproductive success of the clownfish depends on the quality of its home, not its genes. This is the first marine study in the wild that measures the genetic capacity of a species to adapt to environmental change. (2019-11-26)

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)

Great Barrier Reef island coral decline
A long-term study of coral cover on island groups of the Great Barrier Reef has found declines of between 40 and 50 percent of live, hard corals at inshore island groups during the past few decades. Scientists say the data was so alarming that they checked and re-checked it. (2019-10-27)

Fish pass 'hot genes' onto their grandchildren
Fish that are able to survive and adjust to warming waters may pass heat-tolerant genes not just onto their children, but their grandchildren too. Dr Jennifer Donelson is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (Coral CoE at JCU). She is speaking at the 2019 Coral Reef Futures Symposium in Sydney, today. (2019-10-22)

Helping conservation initiatives turn contagious
New research shows that conservation initiatives go viral, which helps scientists and policymakers better design successful programs more likely to be adopted. (2019-10-09)

Dog owners often inaccurately measure out kibble, study finds
New University of Guelph research finds dog owners are often inaccurate when measuring out kibble using a scoop, putting the dogs at risk of under-nourishment or weight gain. (2019-10-07)

Micronutrients 'slipping through the hands' of malnourished people
Populations suffering from malnutrition have the nutrition they need right at their doorstep--in the form of fish. However, a complex picture of illegal fishing and trade in seafood gets in the way. (2019-09-25)

Investing in climate change is good business
Scientists call for governments around the world to urgently invest in reducing the rate and magnitude of climate change. 'Acting on climate change has a good return on investment when one considers the damage avoided,' said lead author Prof Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre for Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at the University of Queensland (UQ). (2019-09-19)

Actions to save coral reefs could benefit all ecosystems
Scientists say bolder actions to protect the world's coral reefs will benefit all ecosystems, human livelihoods and improve food security. (2019-09-18)

Shark pups lose gains in stressed environments
Scientists compared the growth and body condition of one species of shark in two different environments. They found larger shark pups on degraded reefs grow less and perform worse than smaller pups on pristine reefs. Human-induced stressors, including climate change, put shark populations at risk--they may not be able to adapt fast enough to keep pace with the changes that are happening in their environment. (2019-09-17)

Tracking baby fish for better reef management
Scientists have created the world's first computer model to predict the movements of baby coral trout across the Great Barrier Reef. The models are validated by in-depth fieldwork and genetic tracking, and will help managers decide which areas need the most protection to ensure future adult populations of coral trout. (2019-07-31)

Fussy fish can have their coral, and eat it too
Fussy fish seeking refuge from climate change on deeper reefs can still keep their specialised diets. The corals they prey upon change their own diets to survive the different environment at depth. This ensures their fussy predators are still well-fed! (2019-07-23)

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