Current Coeliac Disease News and Events

Current Coeliac Disease News and Events, Coeliac Disease News Articles.
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Could playing host to hookworms help prevent ageing?
Parasitic worms could hold the key to living longer and free of chronic disease, according to a review article published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2021-02-02)

Scientists reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome
KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that explains why some people experience abdominal pain when they eat certain foods. The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Youth depression tied to higher risk of 66 diseases and premature death
Depressed children and teenagers have an increased risk of suffering from premature death and a wide range of illnesses later in life. That is according to a large observational study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The findings highlight the need to look for other potential diseases following childhood or adolescent depression. Other psychiatric conditions, such as anxiety and substance misuse, can explain part of the association. The study is published in JAMA Psychiatry. (2020-12-09)

Iron deficiency can be managed better
Publishing in The Lancet, Australian and European researchers have released updated, evidence-based guidance for managing iron deficiency, a serious worldwide health problem. Iron deficiency is a major cause of anaemia, a lack of oxygen-carrying red blood cells or haemoglobin, which is experienced by two billion people worldwide, and can have serious long-term health consequences. Implementing the best practice diagnosing and managing iron deficiency would lead to significant long-term health benefits. (2020-12-04)

Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found. (2020-09-28)

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?
In recent years, the number of people affected by coeliac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in the past? Results from a study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research are helping to answer this question. (2020-08-11)

Gene variations at birth reveal origins of inflammation and immune disease
A study published in the journal Nature Communications has pinpointed a number of areas of the human genome that may help explain the neonatal origins of chronic immune and inflammatory diseases of later life, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. (2020-07-28)

Good news for the wheat-sensitive among us
A joint project between Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and CSIRO has revealed key insights about the proteins causing two of the most common types of wheat sensitivity - non-coeliac wheat sensitivity and occupational asthma (baker's asthma). (2020-04-23)

New mouse model for celiac disease to speed research on treatments
Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed the first truly accurate mouse model of celiac disease. The animals have the same genetic and immune system characteristics as humans who develop celiac after eating gluten. This provides a vital research tool for developing and testing new treatments for the disease. (2020-02-12)

Bacterial link in celiac disease
Researchers have discovered bacterial exposure is a potential environmental risk factor in developing celiac disease, a hereditary autoimmune-like condition that affects about one in 70 Australians. (2020-01-08)

Association between coeliac disease risk and gluten intake confirmed
An extensive study has confirmed that the risk of developing coeliac disease is connected to the amount of gluten children consume. The new study is observational and therefore does not prove causation; however, it is the most comprehensive of its kind to date. The results are presented in the prestigious journal JAMA. (2019-08-14)

Gluten response in celiac patients could lead to diagnostic test
Distinct markers in the blood of people with celiac disease have been detected within a few hours of gluten being consumed. The findings address a longstanding mystery about what drives the adverse reaction to gluten in celiac disease and could lead to a world-first blood test for diagnosing the disease. A potential blood-based test would be a vast improvement on the current approach which requires people to consume gluten for a number of weeks, and even months, for the testing to be accurate. (2019-08-07)

Baby step towards breath-testing for gut disorders
Small children may one day avoid invasive, painful and often traumatic esophageal tube-testing for gut damage and celiac disease with a new method of simply blowing into a glass tube to provide effective diagnoses. Research published online in international journal Scientific Reports describes an exciting new breath test that could have global implications on how to detect gastrointestinal damage. (2019-03-20)

Immunological scarring from coeliac disease
Immune cells in the bowel of people who suffer with coeliac disease are permanently replaced by a new subset of cells that promote inflammation, suggests a new study involving researchers at Cardiff University. (2019-02-14)

Common virus in early childhood linked to celiac disease in susceptible children
A common intestinal virus, enterovirus, in early childhood may be a trigger for later celiac disease in children at increased genetic risk of the condition, finds a small study published in The BMJ today. (2019-02-13)

Could this widely used food additive cause celiac disease?
A bacterial enzyme that is used to improve food texture and shelf-life has been linked in several studies to celiac disease -- but it is unlabeled and hidden from public knowledge, according to a review published in Frontiers in Pediatrics. (2019-01-03)

Researchers identify pitfall in popular prostate cancer PET imaging method
Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has become a popular method for determining the stage of a patient's prostate cancer. However, researchers have identified a major pitfall in this imaging technique and are cautioning medical professionals to be aware of the potential for misdiagnosis. (2018-09-07)

Huge variation in prescribing practice for gluten-free foods in England
Prescribing practice for gluten-free foods in England varies hugely, and doesn't seem to be driven by obvious medical factors, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2018-04-16)

Researchers find existing drug effective at preventing onset of type 1 diabetes
A drug commonly used to control high blood pressure may also help prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes in up to 60 percent of those at risk for the disease, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the University of Florida in Gainesville. (2018-02-15)

Key to immune system's memory revealed
Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute scientists have defined a novel molecular 'blueprint' that plays a pivotal part in the immune system's ability to fight disease by 'remembering' infections. Understanding the fine detail of immunological memory potentially opens ways to improve, and to create new vaccines, and to hone treatments that use the immune system to fight disease including cancer. (2017-12-19)

ImmusanT publishes positive data from Phase 1 trials of Nexvax2 in celiac disease patients
ImmusanT announces the publication of positive data from Phase 1 clinical trials of the Nexvax2 therapeutic vaccine in celiac disease patients in The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology. (2017-05-12)

Autoimmune disease may be linked to heightened dementia risk
Autoimmune disease may be linked to a heightened risk of dementia, indicates a large long term study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2017-03-01)

Large Finnish genetic study uncovers potential new treatments for inflammatory diseases
Researchers from the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku, Finland, have studied over ten million DNA variations and found new links between the human genome and inflammation tracers. The study uncovered new possibilities for treatment of diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease and celiac disease. (2017-02-01)

Should gluten-free foods be available on prescription?
In The BMJ this week, experts debate whether gluten-free prescriptions for people with coeliac disease should be removed. (2017-01-10)

New wheat crops as an alternative to a gluten-free diet
Wheat, one of the most widely consumed grains in the world, contains gluten, a mixture of proteins that can be toxic for people with coeliac disease. A new study that analyzed the toxic components of these proteins in various varieties of wheat makes the first step forward towards developing wheat-based products that are safe for celiacs. (2016-12-13)

Landmark project shows heart disease and arthritis risk raised by genetic changes in blood
Today in Cell and associated journals, 24 research studies from the landmark BLUEPRINT project and IHEC consortia reveal how variation in blood cells' characteristics and numbers can affect a person's risk of developing complex diseases such as heart disease, and autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. (2016-11-17)

Worms against the wheeze
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine (AITHM) researchers, at James Cook University (JCU) in Cairns, Australia, have identified a protein secreted by hookworms that suppresses asthma in mice. In vitro tests on cells from people with asthma indicate the protein is also a promising candidate as a treatment for humans with allergies such as asthma. (2016-10-26)

New study links protein in wheat to the inflammation of chronic health conditions
Scientists have discovered that a protein in wheat triggers the inflammation of chronic health conditions, such as multiple sclerosis, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis, and also contributes towards the development of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. (2016-10-16)

New research delimits the possible causes of celiac disease
The amount of gluten could be a more important clue than breast-feeding or the timing of the introduction of gluten for continued research into the causes of celiac disease (gluten intolerance). This is one of the findings from several extensive studies of children with an increased genetic risk of celiac disease conducted by researchers at Lund University in Sweden. (2016-10-03)

Aberrant epigenetic regulation behind the intestinal symptoms in celiac disease
Researchers at the University of Tampere discovered a regulation mechanism governing the intestinal homeostasis. Disturbances in this mechanism are implicated in celiac disease and possibly also in colorectal cancer. (2016-09-07)

Season and region of birth linked to heightened childhood celiac disease risk
Circulating viral infections may help explain the temporal and geographical patterns associated with the risk of developing childhood celiac disease, conclude Swedish researchers in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2016-08-15)

Patients with celiac disease should receive pneumonia vaccine
Researchers have found that patients with celiac disease are at high risk of acquiring pneumonia if they haven't received the pneumococcal vaccine. (2016-05-13)

National clinical database to help reduce number of miscarriages
A new national database could help relieve the misery of miscarriage for thousands of women. Researchers from the University of Warwick's Institute of Digital Healthcare (IDH) are using data to help discover why some pregnancies fail. (2016-04-25)

A key gene in the development of celiac disease has been found in 'junk' DNA
Forty percent of the population carry the main risk factor for celiac disease but only 1 percent go down with it. A new gene that influences its development has been found in what until recently has been known as 'junk' DNA. The research, in which a UPV/EHU group has participated, has been published in Science. (2016-04-08)

New guidelines reverse previous recommendations on gluten introduction to prevent celiac disease
Based on new evidence, the age of introduction of gluten into the infant diet -- or the practice of introducing gluten during breast-feeding -- does not reduce the risk of celiac disease in infants at risk, according to a Position Paper of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). The statement appears in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN), official journal of ESPGHAN and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2016-01-18)

Research finds new link between zonulin and 2 common inflammatory bowel conditions
Researchers have discovered that people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have higher than normal blood levels of zonulin, suggesting an important role for the protein in the development of these conditions. (2015-10-27)

Early life infections may be a risk factor for celiac disease in childhood
Children with frequent infections in the first 18 months of life have a slightly increased risk of later developing celiac disease compared with children who have few infections. This is the conclusion from a study by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. (2015-09-28)

Childhood coeliac disease discovery opens door for potential treatments
A new study has revealed childhood coeliac disease mirrors the condition in adults, increasing the possibility a coeliac disease therapy that could enable patients to eat gluten again will work in children. (2015-09-02)

Delayed diagnosis of celiac disease may put lives at risk: Is screening the solution?
Celiac disease is one of the most common life-long conditions in Europe, yet many people remain undiagnosed and lengthy diagnostic delays may be putting lives at risk. Today, doctors are being urged to consider testing for celiac disease in anyone showing signs and symptoms of the condition and to consider screening everyone in high-risk groups. (2015-04-24)

Optical resonance-based biosensors designed for medical applications
A telecommunications engineer of the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, has designed in his Ph.D. thesis optical resonance-based biosensors for use in medical applications like, for example, the detecting of celiac disease. Besides achieving greater resolution and sensitivity, the materials used in these devices are much cheaper and more versatile than the ones used in current technologies (mainly gold and noble metals) so they could offer a potential alternative in the design of biomedical sensors. (2015-04-17)

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