Current Coffee Pots News and Events

Current Coffee Pots News and Events, Coffee Pots News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Déjà brew? Another shot for lovers of coffee
In a world first genetic study, researchers from the Australian Centre for Precision Health at the University of South Australia found that that long-term, heavy coffee consumption - six or more cups a day - can increase the amount of lipids (fats) in your blood to significantly heighten your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). (2021-02-18)

Existing heart failure drug may treat potential COVID-19 long-hauler symptom
UC San Diego clinical trial suggests ivabradine may be effective in treating postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, a potential COVID-19 long-hauler symptom. (2021-02-15)

Regular caffeine consumption affects brain structure
Coffee, cola or an energy drink: caffeine is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive substance. Researchers from the University of Basel have now shown in a study that regular caffeine intake can change the gray matter of the brain. However, the effect appears to be temporary. (2021-02-15)

Coffee lovers, rejoice! Drinking more coffee associated with decreased heart failure risk
nalysis of three large, well-known heart disease studies found drinking one or more cups of caffeinated coffee was associated with decreased heart failure risk. Drinking decaffeinated coffee did not have the same benefit and may be associated with an increased risk for heart failure. There is not yet enough clear evidence to recommend increasing coffee consumption to decrease risk of heart disease with the same strength and certainty as stopping smoking, losing weight or exercising. (2021-02-09)

Samara Polytech scientists proved the anti-cancer properties of a number of plant extracts
The composition of some extracts obtained from plant raw materials was studied at Samara Polytech, and their anticarcinogenic and antioxidant properties were assessed. (2021-02-09)

New report explores effect of coffee through our daily sleep and wake cycles
New report reviews latest research into coffee's effect on sleep. Suggests that while drinking coffee early in the day can help support alertness and concentration levels, especially when sleep patterns are disturbed; decreasing intake six hours before bedtime may help reduce its impact on sleep. (2021-02-04)

Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%. Drinking one cup of coffee each day lowered the risks of death for heart attack survivors and for those without a history of stroke or heart attack. (2021-02-04)

Fungus that eats fungus could help coffee farmers
Coffee rust is a parasitic fungus and a big problem for coffee growers around the world. A study in the birthplace of coffee - Ethiopia - shows that another fungus seems to have the capacity to supress the rust outbreaks in this landscape. (2021-02-03)

Detecting ADHD with near perfect accuracy
A new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher has identified how specific communication among different brain regions, known as brain connectivity, can serve as a biomarker for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2021-01-27)

Study suggests coffee temporarily counteracts effect of sleep loss on cognitive function
A new study exploring the impact of repeated sleep loss during a simulated working week has found that consuming caffeinated coffee during the day helps to reduce impacts to people's vigilance, alertness, reaction-time, accuracy, working memory, attention and cognitive function, compared to decaffeinated coffee. (2021-01-21)

Eating habits partly down to your genetics, finds new study
Your food intake patterns are partly under genetic control, according to the latest research from researchers at King's College London, published today in the journal Twin Research and Human Genetics. (2021-01-19)

Spilling the beans on coffee's true identity
People worldwide want their coffee to be both satisfying and reasonably priced. To meet these standards, roasters typically use a blend of two types of beans, arabica and robusta. But, some use more of the cheaper robusta than they acknowledge, as the bean composition is difficult to determine after roasting. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have developed a new way to assess exactly what's in that cup of joe. (2021-01-13)

NUS researchers concoct probiotic coffee and tea drinks
Good news for those who need a cuppa to start the day. Food scientists from the National University of Singapore have created new probiotic coffee and tea drinks that are packed with over 1 billion units of gut-friendly live probiotics. These non-dairy and plant-based beverages are can be stored chilled or at room temperature for more than 14 weeks. (2021-01-10)

Ancient DNA retells story of Caribbean's first people, with a few plot twists
The history of the Caribbean's original islanders comes into sharper focus in a new Nature study that combines decades of archaeological work with advancements in genetic technology. (2020-12-23)

This tableware made from sugarcane and bamboo breaks down in 60 days
Scientists have designed a set of 'green' tableware made from sugarcane and bamboo that doesn't sacrifice on convenience or functionality and could serve as a potential alternative to plastic cups and other disposable plastic containers, which can take as long as 450 years or require high temperatures to degrade. This non-toxic, eco-friendly material only takes 60 days to break down. This plastic alternative is presented November 12, 2020 in the journal Matter. (2020-11-12)

Researchers simulate privacy leaks in functional genomics studies
In a study publishing November 12 in the journal Cell, a team of investigators demonstrates that it's possible to de-identify raw functional genomics data to ensure patient privacy. They also demonstrate how these raw data could be linked back to specific individuals through their gene variants by something as simple as an abandoned coffee cup if these sanitation measures are not put in place. (2020-11-12)

Golden ticket: Researchers examine what consumers desire in chocolate products
Gold foil, ornate labels and an intriguing backstory are product characteristics highly desired by premium chocolate consumers, according to research conducted by food scientists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. The study is one of the first to thoroughly research what American premium chocolate consumers find to be desirable attributes in their chocolate bars. (2020-11-11)

Biologists shed light on mystery of how microbes evolve and affect hosts
While associations between microbes and their hosts have long been known, little is known about how microbes evolve and how their evolution affects the health of their hosts. Now, researchers find that as microbes evolve and adapt to their unique hosts, they become less beneficial to hosts of other genotypes, suggesting that there is probably not one universally healthy microbiome and that transplanted microbes need time to adapt to a host before they bring benefits. (2020-11-02)

Drinking green tea and coffee daily linked to lower death risk in people with diabetes
Drinking plenty of both green tea and coffee is linked to a lower risk of dying from any cause among people with type 2 diabetes, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. (2020-10-20)

'Happy ending effect' can bias future decisions, say scientists
Our brains can't always reliably evaluate experiences that unfold over time. We tend to give disproportionate weight to the later part of an experience. This can lead to bad decisions when choosing whether to repeat an experience. (2020-10-19)

Gut bacteria could be responsible for side effect of Parkinson's drug
Bacteria in the small intestine can deaminate levodopa, the main drug that is used to treat Parkinson's disease. Bacterial processing of the unabsorbed fractions of the drug results in a metabolite that reduces gut motility. These findings were described in the journal BMC Biology on 20 October by scientists from the University of Groningen. Since the disease is already associated with constipation, processing of the drug by gut bacteria may worsen gastrointestinal complications. (2020-10-19)

Scientists release previously unseen footage showing environmental impacts of pot fishing
The findings of research by the University of Plymouth go against previous thinking around the damage caused by pot fishing to the seabed (2020-10-13)

Well-formed disorder for versatile light technologies
Researchers at ETH have managed to make an efficient material for broadband frequency doubling of light using microspheres made of disordered nanocrystals. The crucial idea for the method arose during a coffee break. In the future, the new approach could be used in lasers and other light technologies. (2020-10-13)

Drink coffee after breakfast, not before, for better metabolic control
The new study looked at the combined effects of disrupted sleep and caffeine on our metabolism - with surprising results. (2020-09-30)

Even in people with Parkinson's gene, coffee may be protective
Even for people with a gene mutation tied to Parkinson's disease, coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of actually developing the disease, according to a new study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-09-30)

Examining association of coffee consumption, survival in patients with colorectal cancer
Researchers in this observational study investigated the association between the number of cups of coffee consumed per day and survival in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. (2020-09-17)

Coffee associated with improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients
In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report in a new study. (2020-09-17)

When methane-eating microbes eat ammonia instead
As a side effect of their metabolism, microorganisms living on methane can also convert ammonia. In the process, they produce nitric oxide (NO), a central molecule in the global nitrogen cycle. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (DE), and Radboud University, Nijmegen (NL), now discovered the enzyme that produces NO, closing an important gap in our understanding of how methanotrophs deal with rising environmental ammonia concentrations. (2020-09-13)

To recreate ancient recipes, check out the vestiges of clay pots
UC Berkeley archaeologists have discovered that unglazed ceramic cookware can retain the residue of not just the last supper cooked, but earlier meals as well, opening a window onto gastronomic practices possibly going back millennia. (2020-09-11)

A coffee and catnap keep you sharp on the nightshift
A simple coffee and a quick catnap could be the cure for staying alert on the nightshift as new research from the University of South Australia shows that this unlikely combination can improve attention and reduce sleep inertia. (2020-08-28)

Archaeology: Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Analysing three components of ceramic cooking pots -- charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls -- may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilizations. The findings, from a year-long cooking experiment, are published this week in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-27)

More healthful milk chocolate by adding peanut, coffee waste
Milk chocolate is a consumer favorite worldwide, prized for its sweet flavor and creamy texture. In contrast, dark chocolate has high levels of phenolic compounds, which can provide antioxidant health benefits, but is less popular. Today, researchers report a new way to combine milk chocolate with waste peanut skins and other wastes to boost its antioxidant properties. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

Researchers one step closer to bomb-sniffing cyborg locusts
Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has determined that locusts can smell explosives and determine where the smells originated -- an important step in engineering cyborg bomb-sniffing locusts. (2020-08-14)

Face mask insert could help diagnose conditions
Given current events, many people are wearing face masks to protect themselves and others. But that same face mask could someday also collect useful health information. Researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have demonstrated that a fiber inserted into an ordinary N95 face mask can collect compounds in exhaled breath aerosols for analysis. The new method could allow screening for disease biomarkers on a large scale. (2020-08-12)

Coffee stains inspire optimal printing technique for electronics
Using an alcohol mixture, researchers modified how ink droplets dry, enabling cheap industrial-scale printing of electronic devices at unprecedented scales. (2020-08-12)

Study clarifies kinship of important plant group
Asterids comprise around 100,000 flowering plants, from heather to tomatoes. Up to now, their family relationships had not yet been fully clarified. A new study by the University of Bonn, Pennsylvania State University (USA) and Fudan University (China) has now somewhat closed this knowledge gap. It is the world's most detailed phylogenetic analysis ever conducted for asterids. The results of the study have been published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (2020-08-05)

The problem with microwaving tea
Through convection, as the liquid toward the bottom of a container warms up, it becomes less dense and moves to the top, allowing a cooler section of the liquid to contact the heating source. This ultimately results in a uniform temperature. Inside a microwave, however, the electric field acting as the heating source exists everywhere and the convection process does not occur. Researchers studied this nonuniform heating behavior and present a solution in AIP Advances. (2020-08-04)

Supportive communities and progressive politics can reduce suicide risk among LGBTQ girls
Many LGBTQ youth continue to experience stigma and discrimination despite Canada's progress in protecting human rights. New research from UBC's school of nursing shows that supportive communities--and a progressive political climate--can help mitigate the effects of stigma on mental health. (2020-07-28)

New chemical analyzes: What did Danes and Italians in the Middle Ages have in common?
Chemists have analyzed bones from a Danish and an Italian cemetery, casting light on the lives of nobles and common people in the north and the south of Europe. (2020-07-15)

Vision scientists discover why people literally don't see eye to eye
We humans may not always see eye to eye on politics, religion, sports and other matters of debate. And now it turns out we also cannot agree on the location and size of objects in our physical surroundings, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2020-07-14)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.