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Current Coffee News and Events, Coffee News Articles.
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Coffee plants have a small but consistent core microbiome of fungi and bacteria
These scientists explored the tissues of coffee roots to look for signs of a 'core microbiome,' or for signs of microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, that form partnerships with the coffee plant. (2020-04-30)

How to make the healthiest coffee during COVID-19 lockdown
We may all be drinking more coffee to help us survive the COVID-19 lockdown. Today scientists announce the healthiest way to make a brew. The first study to examine links between coffee brewing methods and risks of heart attacks and death has concluded that filtered brew is safest. The research is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-04-22)

Coffee changes our sense of taste
Sweet food is even sweeter when you drink coffee. This is shown by the result of research from Aarhus University. The results have just been published in the scientific journal Foods. (2020-04-21)

Coffee grounds show promise as wood substitute in producing cellulose nanofibers
Researchers at Yokohama National University (YNU) meticulously examined cellulose nanofibers extracted from spent coffee grounds, identifying them as a viable new raw source. The YNU team, led by Izuru Kawamura, an associate professor at the Graduate School of Engineering Science, set out to build upon previous research into extracting cellulose nanofibers from coffee grounds. They published their findings on April 1 in the journal Cellulose. (2020-04-06)

Using chemistry to unlock the difference between cold- and hot-brew coffee (video)
Cold brew may be the hottest trend in coffee-making, but not much is known about how this process alters the chemical characteristics of the beverage. Now, scientists report that the content of potentially health-promoting antioxidants in coffee brewed without heat can differ significantly from a cup of joe prepared the traditional way, particularly for dark roasts. (2020-04-02)

Experimental AI tool predicts which COVID-19 patients develop respiratory disease
An artificial intelligence tool accurately predicted which patients newly infected with the COVID-19 virus would go on to develop severe respiratory disease, a new study found. (2020-03-30)

'Whiskey webs' are the new 'coffee ring effect'
Spilled coffee forms a ring as the liquid evaporates, depositing solids along the edge of the puddle. This 'coffee ring effect' has fascinated scientists for decades, but now a team says they have uncovered the mechanism behind an even more striking, web-like pattern that forms when drops of American whiskey dry up. The results, reported in ACS Nano, suggest that these distinctive 'whiskey webs' could someday be used to identify counterfeit spirits. (2020-03-25)

Crop diversity can buffer the effects of climate change
Stanford researchers found that farms with diverse crops planted together provide more secure, stable habitats for wildlife and are more resilient to climate change than the single-crop standard that dominates today's agriculture industry. (2020-03-18)

Food prices after a hard Brexit could increase by £50 per week
A hard Brexit could result in a family of four seeing their food prices increase to up to £50.98 per week researchers at the University of Warwick have found. If we leave with a deal the increase could be as little as £5.80 per week, or £18.17. (2020-03-09)

The complex biology behind your love (or hatred) of coffee
Why do some people feel like they need three cups of coffee just to get through the day when others are happy with only one? Why do some people abstain entirely? New research suggests that our intake of coffee -- the most popular beverage in America, above bottled water, sodas, tea, and beer -- is affected by a positive feedback loop between genetics and the environment. (2020-03-06)

Caffeine boosts problem-solving ability but not creativity, study indicates
Want to boost creativity? Caffeine may not be the way to go according to a news study by U of A psychologist Darya Zabelina. (2020-03-05)

Adequate folate levels linked to lower cardiovascular mortality risk in RA patients
Decreased folate levels in the bloodstream have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, shedding light on why those patients are more susceptible to heart and vascular disease, according to research published today in JAMA Network Open by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-02-26)

A 3D study of a tiny beetle that attacks the fruits of coffee reveals details of its anatomy and secret life that can help fight this pest
Scientists from the University of Granada, thanks to microtomography techniques, reveal secret, and until now unknown, aspects of tunnel construction strategies, and how to exploit the fruit, in addition to the internal structures of a tiny beetle known as the 'coffee berry borer.' (2020-02-05)

Direct touch of food makes eating experience more enjoyable
When high self-control individuals touch food directly with their hands (vs. indirectly with a utensil), they not only experience it as tastier and more satisfying, but they eat more of it. The work, published in the Dec. 19, 2020 issue of the Journal of Retailing, may not only offer a way to increase the appeal of food but also offers retailers a simple way to make the eating experience more enjoyable for consumers sampling food. (2020-02-05)

How supercomputers are helping us link quantum entanglement to cold coffee
Theoretical physicists from Trinity College Dublin have found a deep link between one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics -- quantum entanglement -- and thermalisation, which is the process in which something comes into thermal equilibrium with its surroundings. (2020-01-31)

Movement study could be significant in helping understand brain rehabilitation
Researchers from the University of Plymouth (UK) and Technical University of Munich (Germany) say their study could be particularly important for those working in rehabilitation and helping people to recover after neurological conditions. (2020-01-30)

Are you 'at risk' of being a habitual tofu eater?
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) in Japan and colleagues at Osaka University have found genetic variations in humans related to specific dietary habits. Published in Nature Human Behaviour, the genome-wide association study found 9 gene locations associated with eating and drinking foods like meat, tofu, cheese, tea, and coffee. Among them, three were also related to having particular diseases such as cancer or diabetes. (2020-01-29)

Can a tiny invasive snail help save Latin American coffee?
While conducting fieldwork in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region in 2016, University of Michigan ecologists noticed tiny trails of bright orange snail excrement on the undersurface of coffee leaves afflicted with coffee leaf rust, the crop's most economically important pest. (2020-01-23)

Room for complexity? The many players in the coffee agroecosystem
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2020-01-23)

Researchers brew a formula for consistent espresso and industry savings
Espresso delivers a desired jolt of caffeine but getting a consistent good-taste is difficult. New research is offering a roadmap to reproducibility and a potential savings of $3.1 million a day for coffee shops across the United States. (2020-01-22)

Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math
Mathematicians, physicists and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right. But a team of such researchers including Dr. Jamie Foster, a mathematician at the University of Portsmouth, are challenging common espresso wisdom. (2020-01-22)

Glimpses of fatherhood found in non-pair-bonding chimps
Although they have no way of identifying their biological fathers, male chimpanzees form intimate bonds with them, a finding that questions the idea of fatherhood in some of humanity's closest relatives, according to a study of wild chimpanzees in Uganda. (2020-01-15)

Caffeine may offset some health risks of diets high in fat, sugar
In a study of rats, University of Illinois scientists found that caffeine limited weight gain and cholesterol production, despite a diet that was high in fat and sugar. Lead author was U. of I. alumna Fatima J. Zapata. Co-authors were nutritional sciences professor Manabu T. Nakamura; Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, director of the Division of Nutritional Sciences; and animal sciences professor Jan E. Novakofski. (2019-12-19)

Filtered coffee helps prevent type 2 diabetes, show biomarkers in blood samples
Coffee can help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes -- but only filtered coffee, rather than boiled coffee. New research from Chalmers University of Technology and Umeå University, both in Sweden, show that the choice of preparation method influences the health effects of coffee. (2019-12-17)

Blood lipid profile predicts risk of type 2 diabetes better than obesity
Using lipidomics, a technique that measures the composition of blood lipids at a molecular level, and machine learning, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a blood lipid profile that improves the possibility to assess, several years in advance, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The blood lipid profile can also be linked to a certain diet and degree of physical activity. (2019-12-17)

Azteca ant colonies move the same way leopards' spots form
What could Azteca ants in coffee farms in Mexico have in common with leopards' spots and zebras' stripes? (2019-12-11)

Report discusses potential role of coffee in reducing risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. (2019-12-10)

Research suggests coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome
A report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of developing MetS, a condition which is estimated to affect more than one billion people across the globe. Having MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease and stroke. (2019-11-26)

'Self-cleaning' concrete could keep buildings looking new (video)
Building materials that clean themselves could save immense time and labor in homes and businesses, as well as reduce disease risk in settings such as hospitals. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a new type of concrete that is strong, heat-insulating and soundproof -- and best of all, liquids like milk and coffee bounce right off of it, taking dust particles with them. (2019-11-20)

Protecting native vegetation on rural properties yields Brazil USD 1.5 trillion per year
Paper endorsed by 407 scientists in Brazil estimates the value of ecosystem services linked to nature conservation, such as pollination, pest control and water security. (2019-11-14)

Spin doctors: Astrophysicists find when galaxies rotate, size matters
The direction in which a galaxy spins depends on its mass, researchers have found. (2019-11-14)

Unexpected outcomes: Damages to Puerto Rican coffee farms from Hurricane Maria varied
University of Michigan ecologists Ivette Perfecto and John Vandermeer have studied Latin American coffee farms for a quarter century, and they tracked the recovery of tropical forests in Nicaragua following 1988's Hurricane Joan for nearly 20 years. (2019-10-30)

Study finds coffee is associated with improved sports performance in men and women
A new study, published in Nutrients, of 38 participants (19 men, 19 women) has found that drinking caffeinated coffee improves speed of cycling. The study's findings suggest that both men and women respond similarly to coffee and that coffee ingestion may be a practical source of caffeine prior to exercise to improve performance. (2019-10-29)

What's driving tropical deforestation? Scientists map 45 years of satellite images
Tropical forests are under increasing pressure from human activity such as agriculture. However, in order to put effective conservation measures in place, local decision-makers must be able to precisely identify which areas of forest are most vulnerable. A new analysis method spearheaded by researchers from the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD), the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and the University of Rennes-2 could hold the key. (2019-10-24)

Coffee bean extracts alleviate inflammation, insulin resistance in mouse cells
Food science and human nutrition researchers at the University of Illinois are interested in the potential of inflammation-fighting compounds found in the silverskin and husk of coffee beans, not only for their benefits in alleviating chronic disease, but also in adding value to would-be 'waste' products from the coffee processing industry. (2019-10-11)

Navigating 'Neuralville': Virtual town helps map brain functions
Experiments showed that the brain's parahippocampal place area is involved in recognizing a particular kind of place, while the brain's retrosplenial complex is involved in mentally mapping the locations of particular places. (2019-10-07)

Drinking more sugary beverages of any type may increase type 2 diabetes risk
People who increase their consumption of sugary beverages -- whether they contain added or naturally occurring sugar -- may face moderately higher risk of type 2 diabetes. (2019-10-03)

Lollies, vitamins and fish-shaped sauce containers hit the MRI mark
A study by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, has identified four common items that could be cheaper and equally effective alternatives to commercial markers for use in MRI scanning to pinpoint specific anatomical areas or pathologies being scanned. (2019-09-09)

Coffee may protect against gallstones
Drinking more coffee may help reduce the risk of developing gallstones, according to a new study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine. (2019-09-05)

Fresh water found in the Norwegian Sea
The discovery was made at 800 meters below the surface in two small canyons on the continental slope outside Lofoten archipelago. (2019-08-28)

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