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Current Cognitive Function News and Events, Cognitive Function News Articles.
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Childhood neglect leaves generational imprint
Early life experiences can have an outsized effect on brain development and neurobiological health. New research is showing that those effects can be passed down to subsequent generations, reporting that the infant children of mothers who had experienced childhood emotional neglect displayed altered brain circuitry involved in fear responses and anxiety. (2021-01-19)

Eye tests predict Parkinson's-linked cognitive decline 18 months ahead
Simple vision tests can predict which people with Parkinson's disease will develop cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later, according to a new study by UCL researchers. In a related study, the researchers also found that structural and functional connections of brain regions become decoupled throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. (2021-01-19)

USC study measures brain volume differences in people with HIV
With access to treatment, HIV has become a lifelong chronic condition for the majority of 38 million people living with it. Understanding how it affects the brain over time is increasingly important for improving both treatment and quality of life. A new study of brain scans of 1,203 HIV-infected adults across 5 continents found that with people with lower white blood cell counts also had less brain volume in the hippocampus and thalamus. (2021-01-15)

Effects of head trauma from intimate partner violence largely unrecognized
Carrie Esopenko, assistant professor at the Rutgers School of Health Professions, speaks on new international effort to understand ramifications of concussions and head and neck injuries sustained due to intimate partner violence. (2021-01-14)

Disagreeing takes up a lot of brain real estate
In a new study Yale scientists looked into the brains of individuals engaged in conversation. What they observed varied significantly depending on whether or not the participants were in agreement. (2021-01-13)

Can menopause be blamed for increased forgetfulness and lack of attention?
If you're a bit more forgetful or having more difficulty processing complex concepts than in the past, the problem may be your menopause stage. A new study claims that menopause stage is a key determinant of cognition and, contrary to previous studies, shows that certain cognitive declines may continue into the postmenopause period. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-13)

Including unhealthy foods may diminish positive effects of an otherwise healthy diet
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have reported diminished benefits of a Mediterranean diet among those with high frequency of eating unhealthy foods. The results of their study were published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association on Jan. 7. (2021-01-08)

Routine eye scans may give clues to cognitive decline in diabetes
As they age, people with diabetes are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disorders than are people without diabetes. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have shown that routine eye imaging can identify changes in the retina that may be associated with cognitive disorders in older people with type 1 diabetes. These results may open up a relatively easy method for early detection of cognitive decline in this population. (2021-01-05)

Risk factors associated with all-cause 30-day mortality in nursing home residents with COVID-19
In this observational study of 5,256 U.S. nursing home residents with COVID-19, increased age, male sex and impaired cognitive and physical function were independent risk factors for all-cause 30-day mortality. (2021-01-04)

Scientists explore deficits in processing speed in individuals with spinal cord injury
This study is the first to examine the neural mechanisms of higher order cognitive tasks of individuals with SCI.''Our ability to observe brain activation while the individual performs specific cognitive tasks provides new information on the mechanisms that underlie the cognitive deficits that we now know affect a substantial proportion of the SCI population,'' Dr. Wylie said. ''Developing treatments targeted to these deficits depends on our pursuit of this line of research, which may benefit other populations affected by delayed processing speed.'' (2020-12-30)

'Race norming' blamed for denying payouts to ex-NFL players with dementia
A UCSF clinical psychologist has taken aim at the National Football League (NFL) for ''race norming'' black players diagnosed with dementia, a practice that is depriving them of the monetary awards allocated to former footballers with neurodegenerative disorders. (2020-12-21)

How one pain suppresses the other
When two painful stimuli act on us at the same time, we perceive the one of them as less painful. This phenomenon is part of the body's own pain control system. A disfunction of this inhibition is associated with chronic pain disorders. Researchers at Berufsgenossenschaftliches Universitätsklinikum Bergmannsheil, clinic of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), have developed a method for this. They were able to show that the method works effectively with both painful electrical stimuli and heat pain. (2020-12-21)

Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a team of researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use. These recommendations emphasize helping people gain greater control over their digital environments. (2020-12-21)

Study sets baseline for sleep patterns in healthy adult dogs
A new canine sleep study could serve as a baseline for research on chronic pain and cognitive dysfunction in dogs, potentially improving detection and treatment of these conditions. (2020-12-18)

Hearing loss and high blood sugar linked to poorer learning and memory among older Latinos
Researchers report that hearing loss and high blood sugar are associated with poor cognitive performance among middle-aged and older Latinos. (2020-12-17)

Research strongly suggests COVID-19 virus enters the brain
The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain. In a study published Dec. 16, 2020 in Nature Neuroscience, researchers found that the spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. The spike proteins alone can cause brain fog. Since the spike protein enters the brain, the virus also is likely to cross into the brain. (2020-12-17)

New guideline supports behavioral, psychological treatments for insomnia
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has published a new clinical practice guideline establishing recommendations for the use of behavioral and psychological treatments for chronic insomnia disorder in adults. (2020-12-16)

What lessons can medicine learn from Father Christmas?
As Father Christmas gears up for the busiest 24 hours of his year, what skills does he use to get a seemingly impossible job done effectively and safely - and can they be applied to medicine? (2020-12-16)

Individuals with high ADHD-traits are more vulnerable to insomnia
Individuals with high ADHD-traits that do not meet the criteria for a diagnosis are less able to perform tasks involving attentional regulation or emotional control after a sleepless night than individuals with low ADHD-traits, a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports. (2020-12-16)

Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports. (2020-12-15)

Losing money causes plastic changes in the brain
Researchers at the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have shown experimentally that economic activity can actively change the brain. Signals that predict regular financial losses evoke plastic changes in the cortex. Therefore, these signals are processed by the brain more meticulously, which helps to identify such situations more accurately. The article was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-15)

High blood pressure at any age, no matter how long you have it, may speed cognitive decline
Memory, concentration and other cognitive functions decline faster among middle-aged and older adults who have high blood pressure than those who do not. Even seemingly slight blood pressure elevation during middle and older age is linked to a faster decline in cognition. (2020-12-14)

Stress in adolescence leads to learning and memory difficulties and increased anxiety in adulthood
Stress experienced around puberty (peripubertal) worsens learning and memory in adulthood, as well as anxiety related behavior, as shown by a study led by Dr Cristina Márquez, from the Neuronal Circuits of Social Behavior laboratory at the Neuroscience Institute in Alicante (Spain). (2020-12-14)

Irrelevant information interferes with making decisions, new research reveals
According to new research from behavioral economist Ian Chadd, an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, irrelevant information or unavailable options often cause people to make bad choices. When both elements are present, the probability of a poor decision is even greater. Through an experiment involving 222 individual tests each consisting of more than 40 questions, Chadd's research revealed that decisions made in an environment of irrelevant information carry time, cognitive, and consequence costs. (2020-12-14)

Apathy could predict onset of dementia years before other symptoms
Apathy -- a lack of interest or motivation -- could predict the onset of some forms of dementia many years before symptoms start, offering a 'window of opportunity' to treat the disease at an early stage, according to new research from a team of scientists led by Professor James Rowe at the University of Cambridge. (2020-12-14)

AI that detects post-stroke depression type can help stroke survivors get right treatment
An AI might soon help stroke survivors get the right treatment by detecting a patient's post-stroke depression type, a frequently seen neuropsychiatric manifestation after a stroke that could impair functional recovery. (2020-12-14)

Melatonin: finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) showed that melatonin's metabolite AMK can enhance the formation of long-term memories in mice. Memory of objects were tested after treatment with melatonin or two of its metabolites. Older mice that normally performed poorly on the memory task showed improvements as dosage increased. The metabolite AMK was found to be the most important as melatonin failed to improve memory if it was blocked from metabolizing into AMK. (2020-12-10)

Animal behaviour: Cognitive performance of four-months-old ravens may parallel adult apes
By four months of age the cognitive performance of ravens in experimental tasks testing their understanding of the physical world and how they interact with other ravens may be similar to those of adult great apes, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-10)

Testing memory over four weeks could predict Alzheimer's disease risk
New research suggests testing people's memory over four weeks could identify who is at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease before it has developed. Importantly, the trial found testing people's ability to retain memories for longer time periods could predict this more accurately than classic memory tests, which test memory over half an hour. (2020-12-10)

Diet modifications - including more wine and cheese - may help reduce cognitive decline
The foods we eat may have a direct impact on our cognitive acuity in our later years, according to new Iowa State University research. The study is the first of its kind to connect specific foods with cognitive decline. The findings show cheese protected against age-related cognitive problems and red wine was related to improvements in cognitive function. (2020-12-10)

Five-minute EEG recordings: a key to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Pathological changes related to the disability of Parkinson's patients can already be detected in signals from the scalp without the need to open the skull. Researchers from Leipzig University Hospital and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences recently published these new findings in the journal Brain. (2020-12-09)

Memory deficits resulting from epigenetic changes in Alzheimer's disease can be reversed
Memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be able to be restored by inhibiting certain enzymes involved in abnormal gene transcription, according to a preclinical study by researchers at the University at Buffalo. (2020-12-09)

Researchers share database for studying individual differences in language skills
Why do people differ in their ability to use language? As part of a larger study into this question, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and Radboud University tested 122 adult native speakers of Dutch on various language and cognitive measures, including tests of vocabulary size, grammar, understanding and producing sentences, working memory and processing speed. Other researchers are encouraged to use this database to further investigate individual differences in language skills. (2020-12-08)

Way to support effective brain performance after head injury backgrounded by lack of sleep
Scientists from the School of Biomedicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with colleagues from Italy, Spain, Romania, and Sweden suggest a way to protect the brain and minimize neurodegenerative processes after concussion head injuries in the presence of extensive previous sleep deprivation. This methodology is especially important given the retirement-age increase that has recently become an international trend. A related article appears in the Progress in Brain Research journal. (2020-12-08)

Damage to brain cells reverberates to 'bystander' cells, study finds
Injury or disease that afflicts a relatively small number of brain cells causes a chain reaction that stops activity across a vast network of neural circuits, according to new research. The study may help to explain why people can suffer from temporary but severe loss of cognitive function in cases of traumatic brain injury or disease. (2020-12-08)

Novel form of Alzheimer's protein found in spinal fluid indicates stage of the disease
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a novel form of the Alzheimer's protein tau in the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. This form of tau -- known as MTBR tau -- indicates what stage of Alzheimer's a person is in and tracks with tangles of tau protein in the brain. (2020-12-07)

Astrocytes improve decision-making
A study led by researchers from the Cajal Institute of the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) has demonstrated the relevance of the astrocytes (a cell type present in the Nervous System) in the decision-making process. Data published in Nature Neuroscience journal, indicate that these glial cells favor those decisions with higher etiological value for individuals. (2020-12-07)

Drug reverses age-related cognitive decline within days
Just a few doses of an experimental drug can reverse age-related declines in memory and mental flexibility in mice, according to a new study by UC San Francisco scientists. The drug, called ISRIB, has already been shown in laboratory studies to restore memory function months after traumatic brain injury (TBI), reverse cognitive impairments in Down Syndrome, prevent noise-related hearing loss, fight certain types of prostate cancer, and even enhance cognition in healthy animals. (2020-12-01)

Psychological factors contributing to language learning
Motivation for language learning is a system of cognitive, emotional, and personality-related characteristics. (2020-11-25)

Anxiety associated with faster Alzheimer's disease onset
Anxiety is associated with an increased rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-24)

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