Current Cognitive Performance News and Events

Current Cognitive Performance News and Events, Cognitive Performance News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Tungsten-substituted vanadium oxide breathes fresh air into catalyst technology
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created a new tungsten-substituted vanadium oxide catalyst for breaking down harmful nitrogen oxides in industrial exhaust. Their new catalyst material works at lower temperatures and does not suffer major drops in performance when processing ''wet'' exhaust, resolving a major drawback in conventional vanadium oxide catalysts. They found that the unaggregated dispersal of atomic tungsten in the original crystal structure plays a key role in how it functions. (2021-01-26)

Solar material can 'self-heal' imperfections, new research shows
A material that can be used in technologies such as solar power has been found to self-heal, a new study shows. (2021-01-26)

Sport may fast-track numeracy skills for Indigenous children
Greater sports participation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is linked with better academic performance, according to new research from the University of South Australia. (2021-01-25)

Study recommends rugby league invests in young players' diets
New QUT study recommends NRL rugby league clubs 'invest' in young players' diets to aid performance and recovery with the research outlining specific nutritional needs for the high-impact sport. (2021-01-22)

Reducing traps increases performance of organic photodetectors
Physicists at the Dresden Integrated Center for Applied Physics and Photonic Materials (IAPP) discovered that trap states rule the performance of organic photodetectors, ultimately limiting their detectivity. These highly promising results have now been published in the renowned scientific journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-22)

Does where older US adults die affect their wellbeing at the end of life?
Where people die can affect the quality of their deaths and the end-of-life care that they receive. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that satisfaction with end-of-life care was rated highest when individuals died at home. (2021-01-21)

A new study shows the relationship between surgery and Alzheimer's disease
Amsterdam, January 21, 2021 - A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease carried out by researchers at the Marqués de Valdecilla-IDIVAL University Hospital, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bonn Medical Center, proposes that major surgery is a promoter or accelerator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first author of the publication was Carmen Lage and the principal investigator Pascual Sánchez-Juan. (2021-01-21)

Abnormal hyperactivation in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer's
A research team led by UdeM psychology and neuroscience professor Sylvie Belleville has just targeted an early biomarker of the disease. (2021-01-21)

Study shows number and variety of issues experienced by staff wearing
A new study analysing the impact of PPE staff shows that the number and variety of issues they experience increases as their time in PPE without a break increases, ranging from tiredness and headaches in the first hour to nausea, vomiting and dizziness as they head towards four hours continuously in PPE. (2021-01-21)

Study suggests coffee temporarily counteracts effect of sleep loss on cognitive function
A new study exploring the impact of repeated sleep loss during a simulated working week has found that consuming caffeinated coffee during the day helps to reduce impacts to people's vigilance, alertness, reaction-time, accuracy, working memory, attention and cognitive function, compared to decaffeinated coffee. (2021-01-21)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Treating moms with postpartum depression helps their babies' brains
For the study 40 infants of women diagnosed with postpartum depression were matched with 40 infants of non-depressed mothers on infant age, gender and socioeconomic status. The mothers with postpartum depression received nine weeks of group CBT. The infants were all tested before the treatment and nine weeks later, including a questionnaire on the infant behaviour completed by the mother and her partner. (2021-01-20)

Childhood neglect leaves generational imprint
Early life experiences can have an outsized effect on brain development and neurobiological health. New research is showing that those effects can be passed down to subsequent generations, reporting that the infant children of mothers who had experienced childhood emotional neglect displayed altered brain circuitry involved in fear responses and anxiety. (2021-01-19)

Eye tests predict Parkinson's-linked cognitive decline 18 months ahead
Simple vision tests can predict which people with Parkinson's disease will develop cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later, according to a new study by UCL researchers. In a related study, the researchers also found that structural and functional connections of brain regions become decoupled throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. (2021-01-19)

CMOS-compatible 3D ferroelectric memory with ultralow power and high speed
POSTECH Professor Jang-Sik Lee's research team develops ferroelectric NAND flash memory. (2021-01-18)

Effects of head trauma from intimate partner violence largely unrecognized
Carrie Esopenko, assistant professor at the Rutgers School of Health Professions, speaks on new international effort to understand ramifications of concussions and head and neck injuries sustained due to intimate partner violence. (2021-01-14)

Disagreeing takes up a lot of brain real estate
In a new study Yale scientists looked into the brains of individuals engaged in conversation. What they observed varied significantly depending on whether or not the participants were in agreement. (2021-01-13)

Can menopause be blamed for increased forgetfulness and lack of attention?
If you're a bit more forgetful or having more difficulty processing complex concepts than in the past, the problem may be your menopause stage. A new study claims that menopause stage is a key determinant of cognition and, contrary to previous studies, shows that certain cognitive declines may continue into the postmenopause period. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-13)

KU studies show breakfast can improve basketball shooting performance
In a pair of studies, University of Kansas sport science researchers have found that consuming breakfast can improve basketball shooting performance, significantly in some cases. Another study found that college players' lower body strength and performance can predict professional potential as well. (2021-01-13)

Including unhealthy foods may diminish positive effects of an otherwise healthy diet
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have reported diminished benefits of a Mediterranean diet among those with high frequency of eating unhealthy foods. The results of their study were published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association on Jan. 7. (2021-01-08)

Noncognitive skills -- distinct from cognitive abilities -- are important to success across the life
Noncognitive skills and cognitive abilities are both important contributors to educational attainment and lead to success across the life course, according to a new study from an international team. The research provides evidence for the idea that inheriting genes that affect things other than cognitive ability are important for understanding differences in people's life outcomes. Until now there had been questions about what these noncognitive skills are and how much they matter for life outcomes. (2021-01-07)

Sleep is irreplaceable for the recovery of the brain
Researchers at the Medical Center - University of Freiburg demonstrate, for the first time directly, that active recovery processes take place in the brain during sleep that cannot be replaced by rest / Findings relevant for optimal performance (2021-01-07)

Impurities boost performance of organic solar cells
An electrochemical method for stabilizing a reactive molecule can help the development of higher efficiency solar cells. (2021-01-05)

Routine eye scans may give clues to cognitive decline in diabetes
As they age, people with diabetes are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disorders than are people without diabetes. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have shown that routine eye imaging can identify changes in the retina that may be associated with cognitive disorders in older people with type 1 diabetes. These results may open up a relatively easy method for early detection of cognitive decline in this population. (2021-01-05)

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
In a paper published Jan. 5 in Diabetes Care, researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists. (2021-01-05)

A pursuit of better testing to sort out the complexities of ADHD
The introduction of computer simulation to the identification of symptoms in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has potential to provide an additional objective tool to gauge the presence and severity of behavioral problems, Ohio State University researchers suggest in a new publication. (2020-12-30)

Scientists explore deficits in processing speed in individuals with spinal cord injury
This study is the first to examine the neural mechanisms of higher order cognitive tasks of individuals with SCI.''Our ability to observe brain activation while the individual performs specific cognitive tasks provides new information on the mechanisms that underlie the cognitive deficits that we now know affect a substantial proportion of the SCI population,'' Dr. Wylie said. ''Developing treatments targeted to these deficits depends on our pursuit of this line of research, which may benefit other populations affected by delayed processing speed.'' (2020-12-30)

Brain imaging predicts PTSD after brain injury
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex psychiatric disorder brought on by physical and/or psychological trauma. How its symptoms, including anxiety, depression and cognitive disturbances arise remains incompletely understood and unpredictable. Treatments and outcomes could potentially be improved if doctors could better predict who would develop PTSD. Now, researchers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have found potential brain biomarkers of PTSD in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). (2020-12-29)

'Race norming' blamed for denying payouts to ex-NFL players with dementia
A UCSF clinical psychologist has taken aim at the National Football League (NFL) for ''race norming'' black players diagnosed with dementia, a practice that is depriving them of the monetary awards allocated to former footballers with neurodegenerative disorders. (2020-12-21)

How one pain suppresses the other
When two painful stimuli act on us at the same time, we perceive the one of them as less painful. This phenomenon is part of the body's own pain control system. A disfunction of this inhibition is associated with chronic pain disorders. Researchers at Berufsgenossenschaftliches Universitätsklinikum Bergmannsheil, clinic of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), have developed a method for this. They were able to show that the method works effectively with both painful electrical stimuli and heat pain. (2020-12-21)

Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a team of researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use. These recommendations emphasize helping people gain greater control over their digital environments. (2020-12-21)

Female athletes in WNBA don't return to elite performance for at least 2 years after ACL surgery
Study findings of ACL injuries in WNBA athletes sets return to sport expectations for all female athletes (2020-12-21)

Waste to treasure: Crayfish shells to store energy
Other than a spicy night snack, the crayfish has been endowed with greater significance. Prof. ZHU Xifeng's team from University of Science and Technology of China made it possible to use crayfish shell as the biological template for high-performance supercapacitors. (2020-12-21)

Study sets baseline for sleep patterns in healthy adult dogs
A new canine sleep study could serve as a baseline for research on chronic pain and cognitive dysfunction in dogs, potentially improving detection and treatment of these conditions. (2020-12-18)

Hearing loss and high blood sugar linked to poorer learning and memory among older Latinos
Researchers report that hearing loss and high blood sugar are associated with poor cognitive performance among middle-aged and older Latinos. (2020-12-17)

New guideline supports behavioral, psychological treatments for insomnia
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has published a new clinical practice guideline establishing recommendations for the use of behavioral and psychological treatments for chronic insomnia disorder in adults. (2020-12-16)

Individuals with high ADHD-traits are more vulnerable to insomnia
Individuals with high ADHD-traits that do not meet the criteria for a diagnosis are less able to perform tasks involving attentional regulation or emotional control after a sleepless night than individuals with low ADHD-traits, a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports. (2020-12-16)

Losing money causes plastic changes in the brain
Researchers at the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have shown experimentally that economic activity can actively change the brain. Signals that predict regular financial losses evoke plastic changes in the cortex. Therefore, these signals are processed by the brain more meticulously, which helps to identify such situations more accurately. The article was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-15)

High blood pressure at any age, no matter how long you have it, may speed cognitive decline
Memory, concentration and other cognitive functions decline faster among middle-aged and older adults who have high blood pressure than those who do not. Even seemingly slight blood pressure elevation during middle and older age is linked to a faster decline in cognition. (2020-12-14)

Stress in adolescence leads to learning and memory difficulties and increased anxiety in adulthood
Stress experienced around puberty (peripubertal) worsens learning and memory in adulthood, as well as anxiety related behavior, as shown by a study led by Dr Cristina Márquez, from the Neuronal Circuits of Social Behavior laboratory at the Neuroscience Institute in Alicante (Spain). (2020-12-14)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.