Current Columbus News and Events

Current Columbus News and Events, Columbus News Articles.
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Study: in social media safety messages, the pictures should match the words
When using social media to nudge people toward safe and healthy behaviors, it's critical to make sure the words match the pictures, according to a new study. After looking at social media posts, parents of young children were better able to recall safety messages such as how to put a baby safely to sleep when the images in the posts aligned with the messages in the text. (2020-12-31)

Calls to city 311 lines can predict opioid overdose hotspots
Service requests to city non-emergency telephone lines can help identify 'hotspots' for opioid use and overdoses, a study in Columbus found. Researchers found that calls to the 311 line - used in many cities across the United States to report non-emergency issues - tracked closely to places and times in Columbus in which opioid overdose events were on the rise. (2020-11-11)

Expenditures for primary care may affect how primary care is delivered
This study looks at trends in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for visits to primary care physicians. Using the 2002-2017 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), the authors described changes in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for primary care visits for Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance. If current trends continue, the authors would expect increasing difficulty with primary care physician access, particularly for Medicaid patients. (2020-09-15)

Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
Columbus brought syphilis to Europe -- or did he? A recent study conducted at the University of Zurich now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. In addition, researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 years old. (2020-08-13)

Even if you want to, you can't ignore how people look or sound
Your perceptions of someone you just met are influenced in part by what they look like and how they sound. But can you ignore how someone looks or how they sound if you're told it is not relevant? Probably not, at least in most cases, a new study found. (2020-07-22)

How a few negative online reviews early on can hurt a restaurant
Just a few negative online restaurant reviews can determine early on how many reviews a restaurant receives long-term, a new study has found. The study, published online earlier this month in the journal Papers in Applied Geography, also found that a neighborhood's median household income affected whether restaurants were rated at all. (2020-07-22)

Study finds decreased rates of high-cost care after a community development initiative
More than a decade into the community development initiative called Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families, the 30-block Southern Orchards neighborhood on Columbus, Ohio's South Side had clear, notable improvement. Home vacancy fell from 30% to under 6%. High school graduation rates increased. More than $40 million in investments were generated in the area. (2020-07-08)

Income, race are associated with disparities in access to green spaces
Access to green spaces in metro areas--parks, trails, even the tree cover in a neighborhood - is largely associated with income and race, new research indicates. Researchers combined census-block-group demographic and socio-economic data with satellite imagery to analyze access to green spaces and vegetation in two metropolitan areas: Columbus, Ohio, and Atlanta, Georgia. Their study appears in the August issue of the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. (2020-06-23)

Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
New research provides insight into how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor becoming poorer. The results of the study, done in Columbus, Ohio, suggest that some of the factors long thought to impact neighborhood values - such as the distance to downtown, nearby highways, or attractions such as city parks - no longer matter much to changing housing prices in an area. (2020-05-28)

Whether marijuana helps with pain is unclear, study suggests
Medical marijuana users who say they have high levels of pain are more likely than those with low pain to say they use cannabis three or more times a day, a new study finds. However, daily marijuana users with severe pain also reported their health had become worse in the past year. (2020-04-08)

Household chemical use linked to child language delays
Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found. (2020-03-04)

Study puts the 'Carib' in 'Caribbean,' boosting credibility of Columbus' cannibal claims
Christopher Columbus' accounts of the Caribbean include descriptions of fierce raiders who abducted women and cannibalized men -- stories long dismissed as myths. But a new study of skulls suggests Columbus may have been telling the truth. (2020-01-10)

Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services. (2019-11-12)

Inhibition of histone deacetylase 2 reduces MDM2 expression and reduces tumor growth in dedifferentiated liposarcoma
Here the researchers present in silico, in vitro, and mouse xenograft studies that suggest that specifically targeting HDAC2 reduces MDM2 expression and has anti-tumor affects in DDLPS. In a murine DDLPS xenograft model, romidepsin reduced tumor growth and lowered tumor MDM2 expression. (2019-10-04)

To increase bike commuters, look to neighborhoods
People agree that bike commuting improves health, reduces air pollution and eases traffic, a recent survey suggests. But that wasn't enough to get most people to commute by bike. New research indicates that a person's neighborhood may play a large role in influencing the decision to commute by bike. (2019-06-26)

Small shops, heavy advertisers less likely to ID for tobacco
'Our findings suggest that certain types of stores -- tobacco shops, convenience stores and those with a lot of tobacco advertising -- are more likely to sell tobacco to a young person without checking his or her ID.' (2019-06-24)

New research examines barriers to vaccination in immunocompromised children
Study examines the barriers to vaccination of immunocompromised children. (2019-04-27)

A disconnect between migrants' stories and their health
While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story. In a small study in Columbus, researchers found that many migrants celebrated living in Columbus. However, they also experienced discrimination and exhibited physical signs of stress, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar and obesity. (2019-02-25)

Men's porn habits could fuel partners' eating disorders, study suggests
A woman whose boyfriend or husband regularly watches pornography is more likely to report symptoms of an eating disorder, new research suggests. In addition to finding an association between a partner's porn habits and eating disorder symptoms, the research also found a higher incidence of those symptoms in women who said they feel pressure from their boyfriends or husbands to be thin. (2019-02-14)

Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks
When the critters that live in and around streams and wetlands are settling into their nighttime routines, streetlights and other sources of illumination filter down through the trees and into their habitat, monkeying with the normal state of affairs, according to new research from The Ohio State University. (2018-12-19)

Researchers examine health behaviors after childhood cancer diagnosis
In a Psycho-Oncology study of childhood cancer survivors, several health behaviors fell short of expectations for exercise and diet during early survivorship, and they remained sub-optimal upon reaching five years post-diagnosis. (2018-11-07)

UToledo study details link between social media and sex trafficking
Social media is increasingly being exploited to contact, recruit and sell children for sex, according to a study by The University of Toledo Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute. (2018-10-08)

Black male youth more fearful when visiting whiter neighborhoods
Young black males feel less safe when they go to neighborhoods with a larger white population than occurs in areas they normally visit, a new study suggests. (2018-08-13)

Housing for health
In a novel approach to improving outcomes for children, a pediatric hospital worked with community partners to address neighborhood effect syndrome as a target for pediatric health care -- treating the neighborhood as a patient. (2018-08-03)

Pattern of association between toddler self-regulation, kindergarten obesity risk
Obesity is among the long-term adult health consequences associated with poor self-regulation during childhood. This study of a nationally representative group of U.S. children suggests the pattern of an association between levels of toddler self-regulation and risk for obesity at kindergarten age differs between boys and girls. (2018-07-16)

Honey may reduce injury in children who have swallowed button batteries
Ingestion of button batteries, which are frequently found in the household setting, can rapidly lead to caustic esophageal injury in infants and children. A new study published in The Laryngoscope found that drinking honey or Carafate® (a cherry- flavored duodenal ulcer prescription) may help reduce esophageal damage. (2018-06-12)

Left ventricular systolic function after pulmonary valve replacement
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 21-30(10); DOI 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0050), Ali N. Zaidi and W. Aaron Kay from Columbus Ohio Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, US consider how following reparative surgery for tetralogy of Fallot or critical pulmonary stenosis (PS), patients frequently present with severe right ventricular (RV) volume overload due to pulmonary regurgitation, resulting in decreased RV function. (2018-06-10)

Why seashells are tougher than chalk (video)
Seashells are made mostly of calcium carbonate, also known as chalk, a mineral soft and crumbly enough to use for sidewalk doodles. Yet seashells are tough and resilient. In this video, Reactions explains why seashells are so different, and why you can't use them to draw on your driveway. (2018-06-07)

Study finds a third of households -- double previous estimates -- struggle to get food
The struggle to get enough nutritious food could be far worse than previously understood, according to a new study examining the intersection between hunger and the types of foods found at nearby stores. (2018-01-24)

How Xanax works (video)
Whether or not you have anxiety, you've probably heard of Xanax. But what's in this popular and widely prescribed drug, and how does it work? This new video from Reactions describes how Xanax works in the anxious brain: https://youtu.be/Kq6oNcd3d-U. (2017-12-05)

Better pancakes through chemistry (video)
Everyone seems to swear by a different pancake recipe. How can you griddle up the perfect pancakes for your Saturday morning breakfast? With chemistry, of course. Just in time for National Pancake Day, this video from Reactions will show you how to use chemistry to improve your flapjacks. (2017-09-25)

Why do phone batteries sometimes explode? (video)
Lithium-ion batteries have become a ubiquitous part of the digital revolution, but not without a serious setback. They keep spontaneously exploding, and consumers are getting sick of it. So, what's the underlying issue, and how can science address it? Learn about the chemistry of battery fires in this new video from Reactions: https://youtu.be/pY-kzHn9kvo (2017-09-12)

Individuals with developmental disabilities experience health care disparities
This research was published in the September/October 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. (2017-09-12)

Smartphone tracking shows fear affects where youth spend time
Youth spend less time in their neighborhoods if area residents have a high fear of crime, according to a new study that used smartphones to track kids' whereabouts. Researchers found that adolescents aged 11 to 17 spent over an hour less each day on average in their neighborhoods if residents there were very fearful, compared to kids from areas perceived as being safer. (2017-08-14)

Targeted therapies show initial effectiveness in subset of papillary thyroid cancer
Two immunotherapy drugs currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of melanoma also show promise for treating a rare but aggressive form of papillary thyroid cancer, according to new research led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. (2017-06-05)

Meningitis bacteria adapting to STI niche, genetic analysis shows
N. meningitidis, usually associated with meningitis and sepsis, is the cause of a recent cluster of sexually transmitted infections in Columbus, Ohio and in other US cities. The bacterium appears to be adapting to a urogenital environment, an analysis of its DNA shows. (2017-04-03)

Low back pain in school-aged children a common occurrence
Low back pain in school-aged children is a common occurrence, and the prevalence of low back pain increases once children reach school age according to a recent review of the literature published online today by the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics. (2017-01-30)

Does cough syrup really work? (video)
What do you do when you have a bad cough? If you reach for the yummy, cherry-flavored cough medicine, you're not alone. Every year, people spend billions of dollars on these over-the-counter remedies. But do any of them work? In this week's Reactions video, we explain the chemistry behind cough medicine, and dig into the evidence to find out which remedies actually work. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/4TnJQYpKz0E. (2017-01-03)

This is your brain on alcohol (video)
It's almost time to ring in 2017. And since most New Year's celebrations include alcohol, Reactions' latest episode explains the chemistry behind its effects -- drunkenness, frequent bathroom breaks and occasionally poor decision-making. Find out how it all comes down to ethanol (which, like all things, should be enjoyed in moderation) here: https://youtu.be/1xVqwYxe4Gw. (2016-12-27)

Do you burn more fat in the cold? (video)
With the holidays in full swing, all of those feasts and festivities can lead to a few extra pounds. But the winter season also brings something that could help with weight loss -- cooler temperatures. In this episode of Reactions, we discuss the science behind boosting your body's ability to burn fat with cold temperatures. Watch it here: https://youtu.be/p-yVmpQoDTk. (2016-12-22)

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