Current Commerce News and Events

Current Commerce News and Events, Commerce News Articles.
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Mummified baboons shine new light on the lost land of Punt
Ancient Punt was a major trading partner of Egyptians for at least 1,100 years. It was an important source of luxury goods, including incense, gold, and living baboons. Located somewhere in the southern Red Sea region in either Africa or Arabia, scholars have debated its geographic location for more than 150 years. A new Dartmouth-led study tracing the geographic origins of Egyptian mummified baboons provides new insight into Punt's location, demonstrating the tremendous nautical range of early Egyptian seafarers. (2020-12-15)

Boosting returns on e-commerce retargeting campaigns
Delivering ECR ads too early can engender worse purchase rates than without delivering them, thus wasting online advertising budgets. (2020-11-13)

New tool improves fairness of online search rankings
In a new paper, Cornell University researchers introduce a tool they've developed to improve the fairness of online rankings without sacrificing their usefulness or relevance. (2020-08-18)

COVID-19 pandemic likely to cause sales tax loss for Ohio municipalities
Small municipalities in Ohio that rely on retail sales taxes from apparel, vehicle sales, restaurants and tourism could see as much as a 50 percent decline in tax revenue because of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study has found. (2020-08-18)

Local food
The COVID-19 pandemic exposes weaknesses in the supply chain when countries go into lockdown. Some are small, such as the toilet paper shortages early on, that, while annoying, were eventually resolved. But what happens when the effects of the pandemic reach the food systems of countries highly reliant on food imports and income from abroad, and commerce slows to a halt? (2020-08-05)

No honor among cyber thieves
A backstabbing crime boss and thousands of people looking for free tutorials on hacking and identity theft were two of the more interesting findings of a study examining user activity on two online 'carding forums,' illegal sites that specialize in stolen credit card information. (2020-07-22)

Nitrogen pollution policies around the world lag behind scientific knowledge
National and regional policies aimed at addressing pollution fueled by nitrogen lag behind scientific knowledge of the problem. (2020-07-06)

Could drones deliver packages more efficiently by hopping on the bus?
In a simulation, drones were able to hitch rides on public transit vehicles to save energy and increase flight range. An algorithm decided which drones should make which deliveries, one package at a time, in what order -- and when to fly versus hitching a ride. (2020-06-23)

Black and female principal candidates more likely to experience delayed and denied promotions
Black and female assistant principals are systematically delayed and denied promotion to principal, compared to their White or male counterparts, despite having equivalent qualifications and more experience on average, according to a new study. The findings were published in June in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed, open access journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-06-15)

Effects of recommender systems in e-commerce vary by product attributes and review ratings
A new study sought to determine how the impact of recommender systems (also called recommenders) is affected by factors such as product type, attributes, and other sources of information about products on retailers' websites. The study found that recommenders increased the number of consumer views of product pages as well as the number of products consumers consider, but that the increase was moderated by product attributes and review ratings. (2020-05-04)

Business-to-business customers expect personal service in online chat
Companies engaged in business-to-business (B2B) sales are also increasingly moving their activities online, but their online chat services and customer interaction have not been studied much yet. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that the nature of social presence in B2B online chat dialogues varied depending on the stage of the customer relationship. (2020-04-17)

What makes an Airbnb host look trustworthy?
Professors Eyal Ert and Aliza Fleischer analyzed 320 Airbnb listings in Stockholm, Sweden and gleaned two main criteria that determine 'visual trustworthiness': One, is the host's characteristics (e.g., gender, facial expression) and the second is the quality of the image itself (e.g., blurry or clear). (2020-02-25)

Researchers validate transferable & accessible method to quantify flavanols & procyanidins
Building on over two decades of research, Mars and the University of California Davis have developed a new methodology to measure cocoa flavanols and procyanidins that is more accurate and more reliable than previous analytical approaches. The method, published in Food & Function, has been developed in partnership with Waters, the world's leading specialty measurement company and chromatography pioneer, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, US Dept. of Commerce (NIST). (2020-02-03)

New research shows live chats can increase sales by nearly 16%
Live chat tools allow for communication between sellers and buyers. They are popular instruments for e-commerce sites that don't have the advantage of face-to-face communication that brick-and-mortar stores do. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research says these live chats can actually increase sales and boost profits. (2020-01-08)

Ancient Roman port history unveiled
A team of international researchers led by La Trobe University and the University of Melbourne have, for the first time worldwide, applied marine geology techniques at an ancient harbour archaeological site to uncover ancient harbour technologies of the first centuries AD. (2019-07-15)

AGS commends bipartisan leaders on bringing training legislation closer to law
As members of the House Committee on Energy & Commerce move to debate, amend, and revise a host of important health proposals, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) again pledged enthusiastic support for one of the Committee's most important bills under consideration: The Educating Medical Professionals and Optimizing Workforce Efficiency and Readiness (EMPOWER) for Health Act of 2019 (H.R. 2781). (2019-07-11)

Location-based data can provide insights for business decisions
Data from social commerce websites can provide essential information to business owners before they make decisions that could determine whether a new venture succeeds or fails. (2019-07-01)

USC researchers imagine a cheaper, fairer marketplace for digital goods
Bhaskar Krishnamachari, a professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, and Aditya Asgaonkar -- a recent undergraduate computer science alum at BITS Pilani, India who visited and worked with Krishnamachari at USC Viterbi over several months in 2018 -- believe they have found a way to make the buying and selling of digital goods less costly, more efficient, and less vulnerable to fraud. Their proposed solution involves blockchain, 'smart contracts,' and game theory. (2019-05-17)

Ultra-secure form of virtual money proposed
A new type of money that allows users to make decisions based on information arriving at different locations and times, and that could also protect against attacks from quantum computers, has been proposed by a researcher at the University of Cambridge. (2019-05-07)

'Ambidextrous' robots could dramatically speed e-commerce
Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley present a novel, 'ambidextrous' approach to grasping a diverse range of object shapes without training. (2019-01-16)

Selling plants on Amazon: A forest of untapped opportunity
The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which horticultural businesses were directly selling live plant products online, either through Amazon, Ebay, or from their own websites. (2018-11-16)

A world without brick-and-mortar stores? Even avid online shoppers say, 'no, thanks'
The majority of consumers, even those who prefer online shopping, think the extinction of brick-and-mortar stores would be bad for society, according to a new University of Arizona-led study that explores consumers' perceptions of today's transforming retail environment. (2018-11-14)

Thanks, statistics! A faster way to improve mobile apps
A Cornell statistician and his colleagues have found a faster way for developers to improve mobile apps, with a new text-mining method that aggregates and parses customer reviews in one step. (2018-11-12)

Sea science: Navy task force promotes increased knowledge of ocean environment
At the 2018 Oceans Conference, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. David Hahn discussed the goals of the US Navy's Task Force Ocean, a signature program of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson. TFO is designed to reinvigorate the Navy's commitment to ocean sciences, advancing its tactical advantage through a better knowledge of the ocean environment and its impact on sensors, weapons and operations. (2018-10-29)

Study sheds light on why the US and China don't see eye-to-eye on e-commerce
New research from Singapore Management University has found that the US is more concerned with digital barriers like internet censorship and cross-border data flow, while China cares more about traditional trade barriers like tariffs. (2018-09-13)

A reliable cryptocurrency needs good governance, say researchers
Participants in cryptocurrency networks like Bitcoin need to be better at preempting beneficial software changes. This will ensure the security and privacy of addresses and transactions, and help retain the value of cryptocurrencies, says Benjamin Trump (ORISE Fellow, United States Army Corps of Engineers). He is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Environment Systems and Decisions, which analyzes the governance challenges of many cryptocurrencies and explains why such challenges threaten the long-term usefulness of such cryptocurrencies. (2018-09-12)

Old Theban port of Chalcis: A medieval maritime crossroads in Greece
One CNRS researcher, in cooperation with Greek colleagues, has focused her attention on a widely disseminated style of ceramics called the 'main Middle Byzantine Production,' found in all four corners of the Mediterranean. The team's findings have just been published online by the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. (2018-07-18)

Do we really buy 'Top-Rated' deals online? New research may surprise you
Anyone who shops online is familiar with those 'top-rated' products or services that rise to the top of their search on e-commerce intermediary sites like Amazon or Expedia. So, do those rankings really help those products or services get sold? According to a new study, the answer is, 'yes' and 'no.' (2018-07-11)

Legal barriers hindering ASEAN trade: Report
ASEAN's legal frameworks must keep pace with how businesses use technology today, say Singapore Management University researchers. (2018-04-05)

Organic fertilizers are an overlooked source of microplastic pollution
Organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation act as a vehicle for microplastic particles to enter the terrestrial environment, with the amount of microplastic particles differing based on pre-treatment methods and plant type, a new study shows. (2018-04-04)

New study uncovers major differences in billing complexity among US health insurers
One frequently proclaimed advantage of single-payer health care is its potential to reduce administrative costs, but new research from the Vancouver School of Economics calls that assumption into question. (2018-04-02)

Want people to fund your Kickstarter project? Sell them on your reputation first
When trying to entice people to invest in your product on a crowdfunding website, potential funders are more concerned about your ethical characteristics than your actual ability to make and deliver the product, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2018-03-28)

Ratings rise over time because they feel easier to make
Tasks often feel easier to perform as we gain experience with them, which can have unintended consequences when the task involves rating a series of items, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings show that ratings given by individuals tend to become more positive over time, whether they're judging a televised dance competition, grading college coursework, or rating short stories. (2018-03-12)

Late-year change in income tax rate leads to billions in unexpected profits and losses
In a paper being published Feb. 5 in Tax Notes, professors from Indiana University and the University of Virginia report that Tax Cuts and Jobs Act this could result in unexpected drops in earnings for two thirds of companies in the Standard & Poor's 500, with a median drop of $100 million. (2018-02-05)

Proceed to checkout? Not on your mobile, say researchers
Shoppers hoping to bag a bargain in the post-Christmas sales are much less likely to go through with their purchases if they are using phones and tablets to buy goods online. This is because consumers often worry they are not seeing the full picture on a mobile app or that they could be missing out on special offers or overlooking hidden costs, according to new research. (2018-01-05)

Regulating toxic chemicals for public and environmental health: A PLOS Biology collection
Over the past several decades thousands of new chemicals have been approved for commerce, even as evidence of their ability to cause serious harm has emerged. A new collection 'Challenges in Environmental Health: Closing the Gap between Evidence and Regulations' publishing Dec. 18-21 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology examines the divide between evidence and policy. (2017-12-18)

Legal analysis finds Arkansas law that bars protection of LGBTQ people unconstitutional
An original legal analysis by NYU College of Global Public Health finds an Arkansas law that prohibits local governments from enacting civil rights protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) individuals to be unconstitutional. (2017-11-21)

NIST, NFL, GE and Under Armour announce grand prize winner in Head Health Challenge III
The US Commerce Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Football League, GE, and Under Armour today announced that a team of materials designers led by Dynamic Research Inc. has been selected as the grand prize winner of Head Health Challenge III, a contest meant to spur the discovery, design and development of advanced materials to better absorb or mitigate force within helmets, pads and other sports and consumer products that protect against traumatic brain injury. (2017-09-06)

How a bunch of bird brains led to the development of touch screens
During WWII, B.F. Skinner and scientists at NIST worked on a project that trained pigeons to be bomber pilots. Although the birds never did any actual missions, the results helped to create modern touch screens. (2017-08-31)

Hope for improving protection of the reticulated python
Trading in skins of the reticulated python is such a lucrative business that illegal exports are rising sharply and existing trade restrictions are being circumvented on a large scale. This is endangering the stability of populations. Therefore, researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the Royal Zoological Society Scotland are developing genetic methods for tracking down individual origins and potential trade routes of the skins. (2017-08-30)

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