Current Communications News and Events

Current Communications News and Events, Communications News Articles.
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Record-breaking laser link could help us test whether Einstein was right
Scientists from Australia have set a world record for the most stable transmission of a laser signal through the atmosphere. The team combined Aussie 'phase stabilisation' technology with advanced self-guiding optical terminals to 'effectively eliminate atmospheric turbulence,' an advance which could help test Einstein's theory of general relativity. (2021-01-22)

Rapid-forming giants could disrupt spiral protoplanetary discs
Giant planets that developed early in a star system's life could solve a mystery of why spiral structures are not observed in young protoplanetary discs, according to a new study by University of Warwick astronomers. (2020-11-26)

Weather-proof chip aims to take self-driving tech, wireless communications to next level
A new device created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin can overcome challenges like bad weather to deliver more secure, reliable communications. This could aid military communications in challenging areas, improve the ability of self-driving cars to see the environment around them and speed up wireless data for potential 6G networks. (2020-11-12)

Building blocks of language evolved 30-40 million years ago
The capacity for language is built upon our ability to understand combinations of words and the relationships between them, but the evolutionary history of this ability is little understood. Now, researchers from the University of Warwick have managed to date this capacity to at least 30-40 million years ago, the last common ancestor of monkeys, apes and humans. (2020-10-21)

Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk
A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found. (2020-09-29)

Criticism of COVID-19 models by democratic political leaders may erode public trust in science
Criticisms of COVID-19 models by Democratic elites in May 2020 appeared to undermine public support for the models' use - and trust in science more broadly -- according to a series of survey experiments conducted with the participation of more than 6,000 Americans. (2020-09-25)

Risk factors for mortality in diabetic patients discharged from hospital identified
When patients are discharged from Hospital those with diabetes are at an increased risk of readmission and mortality, there are guidelines for discharging patients with diabetes to reduce these risks, however researchers from the Institute of Digital Healthcare at WMG, University of Warwick and Warwick Medical School have identified known risk factors for mortality in adult patients discharged from hospital with diabetes. (2020-09-02)

Ultraviolet communication to transform Army networks
Of ever-increasing concern for operating a tactical communications network is the possibility that a sophisticated adversary may detect friendly transmissions. Army researchers developed an analysis framework that enables the rigorous study of the detectability of ultraviolet communication systems, providing the insights needed to deliver the requirements of future, more secure Army networks. (2020-08-11)

Spintronics: Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic
A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic. The basis for this new phenomenon is controlled layer-by-layer growth of each material. An international research team with researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) reported on their unexpected findings in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-08-06)

How creating an "empathy lens" makes P2P marketing communications more effective
Provider-focused P2P marketing communications increase consumers' likelihood of purchase, app download, and willingness to pay. (2020-08-01)

Faster LEDs for wireless communications from invisible light
Researchers have solved a major problem for optical wireless communications - the process by which light carries information between cell phones and other devices. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) pulse their light in a coded message that recipient devices can understand. (2020-07-30)

Researchers identify N95 respirator decontamination method using microwave-generated steam
N95 respirators are recommended by the CDC as the ideal protection method from COVID-19 and, although traditionally single-use, PPE shortages have necessitated the need for reuse. New research published this week in mBio an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, describes an effective, standardized method of decontamination for hospitals and health care centers facing N95 respirator shortages. (2020-06-25)

Interference cancellation with high precision, high speed and low computational complexity
Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a self-interference cancellation filter that is indispensable for the realization of in-band full duplex using the same frequency to transmit and receive simultaneously in wireless communications. The developed self-interference cancellation filter can estimate the distortion caused by radio and the distortion of the radio channel with high accuracy and cancel self-interference. Additionally, it can quickly reach the solution of the filter with low computational complexity. (2020-05-01)

ETRI develops optical communications technology to double data transfer speed
Researchers in South Korea have developed a new optical communications technology that can transfer data in lightning speed. The new technology sends and receives twice as much data than conventional methods. It is expected to contribute to solving data traffic congestion in 5G networks. (2020-02-24)

Plugging into a 6G future with users at the center
For a communications revolution, 6G development needs more human-centric research. (2020-02-07)

New security system to revolutionise communications privacy
A new uncrackable security system created by researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), the University of St Andrews and the Center for Unconventional Processes of Sciences (CUP Sciences) is set to revolutionize communications privacy. (2019-12-20)

A record-setting transistor
A transistor that could be the key to higher bandwidth wireless communications...while requiring less battery life. A UD research team has created a high-electron mobility transistor with record-setting properties. It's an innovation in both material design and device application design. (2019-11-26)

Finding Nemo's cousins
New research reveals anemonefish can see UV light and may use it as a secret channel find their friends and food, while evading predators. (2019-11-11)

Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team led by Jani Kotakoski at the University of Vienna and Jannik Meyer at the University of Tübingen has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene. Direct images of the actual atoms and the analysis of the findings were published in the renowned journal Nature Communications. (2019-10-21)

Compute at the speed of light
A new way to achieve integrated photonics--a new device has been developed at the University of Delaware that could have applications in imaging, sensing and quantum information processing, such as on-chip transformation optics, mathematical operations and spectrometers. (2019-09-26)

New MRI computing technique can spot scar muscles of heart without damaging kidneys
3D MRI computing can measure strain in the heart using image registration method. Traditional method involves giving the patient a dose of gadolinium which can affect the kidney, researchers at WMG, University of Warwick have found. (2019-08-28)

Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study, in collaboration with Syngenta, found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day. The findings could benefit agriculture by reducing crop loss and improving harvests. (2019-08-16)

Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics
An innovative way to pattern metals has been discovered by scientists in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick, which could make the next generation of solar panels more sustainable and cheaper. (2019-08-14)

New insights into how the brain works
This study provides new insights into the functional relationships between inhibitory and excitatory neurons in the brain. (2019-07-29)

New method divides patients with ulcerative colitis in groups
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a way of using gene expression conserved across species to divide patients with the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis into two distinct groups. The findings are published in the journal Nature Communications, and the researchers hope that the method can also be used to subdivide other autoimmune diseases. (2019-06-28)

Discovered: A new property of light
Researchers have discovered that light can possess a new property, self-torque. (2019-06-27)

UQ researcher carving a new path for skier safety
A spectacular stack on a ski slope in Canada has led to a University of Queensland researcher determining a simple modification that could improve skier safety on the snow. UQ's Queensland Brain Institute researcher Dr Will Harrison studied visual perception under different lighting conditions to identify a better method for grooming ski runs. (2019-06-17)

It's not easy being green
Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. By creating mutant plants, UC Riverside researchers have uncovered a cellular communication pathway sought by scientists for decades. (2019-06-14)

Tiny fish a big lure for life on coral reefs
Researchers from Simon Fraser University have discovered how coral reefs support such an abundance and diversity of life. Banting Postdoctoral Fellow Simon Brandl and a team of international researchers revealed that tiny fish species around the world fuel life on coral reefs. The research, published in Science, examines how commonly overlooked 'cryptobenthic' fishes -- tiny, bottom-dwelling creatures -- are a bountiful food source for larger fishes. (2019-05-23)

Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues
Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. The new method, pioneered by Dr. Adam Perriman and colleagues, involves re-engineering the membranes of stem cells to effectively 'weld' the cells together. (2019-04-23)

Research provides important insight on the brain-body connection
A study conducted by University of Arkansas researchers reveals that neurons in the motor cortex exhibit an unexpected division of labor, a finding that could help scientists understand how the brain controls the body and provide insight on certain neurological disorders. (2019-04-18)

Scientists synthesize new nanowires to improve high-speed communication
Scientists from the Institute of Process Engineering, City University of Hong Kong and their collaborators synthesized highly crystalline ternary In0.28Ga0.72Sb nanowires to demonstrate high carrier mobility and fast IR response. The new nanowire could help to improve high-speed communication. (2019-04-10)

Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care
Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers at the University of Warwick and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have found on computer simulated patients. (2019-02-20)

Intuition and failure as valuable ingredients in chemical research
Researchers from the lab of NCCR MARVEL's deputy director Berend Smit and colleagues have developed a methodology for collecting the lessons learned from partially failed trials and incorrect hypotheses -- the experiments that didn't work. The research was published in Nature Communications. (2019-02-06)

Simply shining light on dinosaur metal compound kills cancer cells
A new compound based on iridium, a rare metal which landed in the Gulf of Mexico 66 million years ago, hooked onto albumin, a protein in blood, can attack the nucleus of cancerous cells when switched on by light, University of Warwick researchers have found. (2019-02-03)

How does a quantum particle see the world?
Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences proved that whether an object (in our example, the ball) shows quantum features depends on the reference frame. The physical laws, however, are still independent of it. The results are published in Nature Communications. (2019-01-30)

Discovered: Different brain areas linked to smoking and drinking
Academics at the University of Warwick have found that low functional connectivity of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex that is associated with the tendency to smoke is associated with increased impulsiveness -- which may contribute to the tendency to smoke. The high connectivity of the reward-related medial orbitofrontal cortex in drinkers may increase the tendency to be attracted to the reward of alcohol consumption. (2019-01-08)

Stress related responses regulate immune function
The immune system is composed of a wide range of different immune cells each with dedicated functions. Natural killer T cells form a specialized immune cell that protects against a variety of diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity, metabolic disease or certain infections such as Lyme disease (2018-12-19)

Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible
Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000km. The milestone experiment proves the feasibility of secure quantum communications on a global scale, using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It is reported in full today in the journal Quantum Science and Technology. (2018-12-19)

Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered by WSU researchers
A Washington State University research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics. (2018-12-13)

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