Current Compassion News and Events

Current Compassion News and Events, Compassion News Articles.
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COVID-19 communication
In this narrative medicine essay, a medical school professor expresses gratitude for the caring and empathy expressed by the team caring for her mother hospitalized with COVID-19 and emphasizes the importance of humanity and compassion over facts and statistics for families physically separated from their critically ill loved ones. (2021-02-23)

Mayo Clinic researchers develop test to measure effect of breast cancer gene variants
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have combined results from a functional test measuring the effect of inherited variants in the BRCA2 breast and ovarian cancer gene with clinical information from women who received genetic testing to determine the clinical importance of many BRCA2 variants of uncertain significance (VUS). The findings were published today in a study in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2021-02-19)

Proton therapy induces biologic response to attack treatment-resistant cancers
Mayo Clinic researchers have developed a novel proton therapy technique to more specifically target cancer cells that resist other forms of treatment. The technique is called LEAP, an acronym for 'biologically enhanced particle therapy.' The findings are published today in Cancer Research, the journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2021-02-17)

Researchers identify gene implicated in neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer
A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers has identified that a chromosome instability gene, USP24, is frequently missing in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma, an aggressive form of childhood cancer. The finding provides important insight into the development of this disease. The study is published in Cancer Research, the journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2021-02-17)

Study examines role of biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury in cancer patients
A study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in Kidney International Reports finds that immune checkpoint inhibitors, may have negative consequences in some patients, including acute kidney inflammation, known as interstitial nephritis. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are used to treat cancer by stimulating the immune system to attack cancerous cells. (2021-02-03)

Study updates breast cancer risk estimates for women with no family history
A new multi-institution study led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic pathologist, provides more accurate estimates of breast cancer risk for U.S. women who harbor inherited mutations in breast cancer predisposition genes. The findings of the CARRIERS Consortium study, published Jan. 20 in The New England Journal of Medicine, may allow health care providers to better assess the risk of breast cancer in women ? many of whom have no family history of breast cancer. (2021-01-21)

Study: loneliness highest in the 20s and lowest in the 60s
Seeking to develop effective interventions, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine examined the psychological and environmental factors that lead to patterns of loneliness in different age groups. (2020-11-10)

Is spirituality a component of wisdom?
In a recent study, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found a seventh component of wisdom: spirituality. (2020-10-22)

Nonverbal doctor-patient rapport relieved pain during acupuncture treatment
When 22 acupuncture clinicians and 23 patients seeking pain relief mirrored each other's facial expressions during acupuncture treatment, patients experienced less pain, according to a new study. Additionally, brain activity involved in representing the mental state of others, which is key for empathy and compassion, became more aligned after the doctor and (2020-10-21)

Study provides new hope for children suffering from rare muscle diseases
Stephen Greenspan and Laura Zah were devastated when they learned their son Alexander had a rare genetic mutation, which causes a deadly neuromuscular disease with no known treatment or cure. But the results of an international study, led by researchers from Monash University in Australia, provides renewed hope for children suffering from the progressive and devastating muscle disease. (2020-10-13)

New research provides fresh hope for children suffering from rare muscle diseases
Results of an international study published today in Autophagy and led by researchers from Monash University, School of Biological Sciences, provides renewed hope for children suffering from a progressive and devastating muscle disease. (2020-10-09)

From San Diego to Italy, study suggests wisdom can protect against loneliness
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. The wiser the person, the less lonely they were. (2020-10-01)

Pioneering dual surgery a safe option for patients with polycystic kidney disease
Patients with large polycystic kidneys in need of a kidney transplant can have their diseased kidneys safely removed laparoscopically at the same time as their transplant surgery. That is the finding of a Mayo Clinic study recently published in the American Journal of Transplantation. (2020-09-29)

Loving-kindness meditation will make you happier
Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices - loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM). Loving-kindness meditation turned out to be more effective when it comes to increasing happiness, but, in contrast with previous studies, compassion meditation also did not result in a growth of negative emotions. The paper was published in Mindfulness journal. (2020-09-24)

Mayo study identifies barriers to physician adoption of federal Right to Try law
A new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute is the first to examine the opinions and experiences of clinical oncologists working at a major medical center on the Federal Right to Try (RTT) law. (2020-09-22)

'Awe walks' boost emotional well-being
A regular dose of awe is a simple way to boost healthy 'prosocial' emotions such as compassion and gratitude, according to a new study by researchers at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center (MAC) and the Global Brain Health Institute (GBHI) -- a partnership between UCSF and Trinity College Dublin to improve brain health worldwide. (2020-09-21)

Fear of missing out impacts people of all ages
The social anxiety that other people are having fun without you, also known as FoMO, is more associated with loneliness, low self-esteem and low self-compassion than with age, according to a recent study led by Washington State University psychology professor Chris Barry. (2020-08-26)

Online searches for 'chest pain' rise, emergency visits for heart attack drop amid COVID
A study of search engine queries addressed the question of whether online searches for chest pain symptoms correlated to reports of fewer people going to the emergency department with acute heart problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-08-24)

High blood pressure during pregnancy may mean worse hot flashes during menopause
Women with a history of high blood pressure disorders during pregnancy are more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, according to a study published Wednesday, Aug. 19, in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society. (2020-08-19)

Climate stabilization: Lessons from the corona crisis
Highlighting the parallels between the global health and the climate emergency, a team of researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) has analyzed what policy makers and citizens can learn from the corona outbreak and how to apply it to the global effort of reducing CO2 emissions. Their proposal: A Climate Corona Contract that unites the younger and the older generations. (2020-08-14)

Patient experiences in medical imaging and radiation therapy: The importance of skilled patient care professionals
I went into the MRI bracing for the wave of panic I knew would come as soon as I was strapped down and inside the machine.'' In ''A Tale of Two MRIs'' by patient Lelainia Lloyd, her experiences--good and bad--are shared as part of an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, published by Elsevier. (2020-08-10)

Extra police powers during COVID-19 could affect relationship with public for good
Serving police officer and Huddersfield PhD researcher Dan Jones warns against police forces adopting an authoritarian or militarised approach, following new study (2020-06-15)

Mindfulness combined with hypnotherapy aids highly stressed people, study finds
A new treatment for stress which combines mindfulness and hypnotherapy has shown positive results in a Baylor University pilot study. (2020-06-15)

'Breast is best' push out of touch
University of Queensland researchers have discovered why only 34 per cent of mothers exclusively breastfeed to six months, despite the global push to increase rates to 50 per cent. (2020-06-03)

Olanzapine may help control nausea, vomiting in patients with advanced cancer
Olanzapine, a generic drug used to treat nervous, emotional and mental conditions, also may help patients with advanced cancer successfully manage nausea and vomiting unrelated to chemotherapy. These are the findings of a study published Thursday, May 7, 2020 in JAMA Oncology. (2020-05-07)

Connecting the dots between heart disease, potential for worse COVID-19 outcomes
People with certain heart diseases may be more susceptible to worse outcomes with COVID-19, but the reason why has remained unknown. New research from Mayo Clinic indicates that in patients with one specific type of heart disease ? obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) ? the heart increases production of the ACE2 RNA transcript and the translated ACE2 protein. (2020-04-27)

Mayo Clinic offer guidance on treating COVID-19 patients with signs of acute heart attack
Much remains unknown about COVID-19, but many studies already have indicated that people with cardiovascular disease are at greater risk of COVID-19. There also have been reports of ST-segment elevation (STE), a signal of obstructive coronary artery disease, in patients with COVID-19 who after invasive coronary angiography show no sign of the disease. (2020-04-09)

Pain in a well-toned body
They are young and well-trained - but a fourth of sport science students suffers from pain in combination with psychosocial stresses. This was revealed in a study that originated at Goethe University. (2020-03-23)

Homeless people receive less treatment in hospitals for heart attacks, have higher readmission rates
Homelessness has become a social crisis and public health problem around the world, affecting people of all ages. Most homeless people are at a disadvantage with few resources, and may or may not have adequate health insurance. Mental illness and substance abuse are common issues in the homeless community. People living on the streets have a high likelihood of developing heart disease. Yet they have little ability to take care of their health. (2020-03-19)

Mayo Clinic-led study links obesity with pancreatitis
A study by researchers at Mayo Clinic in Arizona published in the The Journal of Clinical Investigation has found that obesity is not only implicated in chronic diseases such as diabetes, but also in sudden-onset diseases such as pancreatitis. (2020-03-09)

Gene variants may increase susceptibility to accumulate Alzheimer's protein tau
The toxic protein tau is a key biological feature in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Yet the factors that make people susceptible or resistant to tau accumulation are not well-understood. A preliminary Mayo Clinic study shows that inherited DNA variants may be associated with developing tau deposits in older adults. The research will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto April 25-May 1. (2020-03-03)

Mayo researchers recommend all women with breast cancer diagnosis under age 66
A study by researchers at Mayo Clinic published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology suggests that all women with a breast cancer diagnosis under the age of 66 be offered germline genetic testing to determine if they have a gene mutation known to increase the risk of developing other cancers and cancers among blood relatives. (2020-03-02)

Immune cells may improve accuracy of predicting survival in colorectal cancer
The density of immune cells, called tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, when combined with analysis of tumor budding may serve as a method to more accurately predict survival in patients with stage III colon cancer. The findings, by a team of researchers led by Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and oncologist, Frank Sinicrope, M.D., were published today in Annals of Oncology. (2020-03-02)

Mayo researchers discover way to prime cancer tumors for immunotherapy
A cancer tumor's ability to mutate allows it to escape from chemotherapy and other attempts to kill it. So, encouraging mutations would not be a logical path for cancer researchers. Yet a Mayo Clinic team and their collaborators took that counterintuitive approach and discovered that while it created resistance to chemotherapy, it also made tumors sensitive to immunotherapy. They also found that this approach worked successfully across tumor types and individual patient genomes. (2020-02-07)

Novel intervention in senior housing communities increases resilience and wisdom
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with Mather Institute, developed a method to enhance resilience and reduce subjective stress in residents living in senior housing communities. (2020-02-05)

Earlier detection of women's vascular health issues can affect heart disease risk
Men and women differ in the way their vascular systems age and the rate at which atherosclerosis -- the hardening of artery walls or buildup of arterial blockage -- progresses over time. These sex- and age-related differences have a direct bearing on a woman's risk factors for cardiovascular disease. (2020-02-05)

Subtle structural features in donated kidneys may predict risk of transplant failure
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that subtle structural features in kidneys from living donors that can only be seen with a microscope may predict the risk of transplant failure in recipients. The findings are published online in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2020-01-23)

Certain liver cells may help prevent organ rejection after transplant, study finds
Mesenchymal stromal cells from fat tissue and bone marrow are widely used in therapeutic trials for their anti-inflammatory qualities, but new Mayo Clinic research finds that liver cells may be of greater value. The study, published in Liver Transplantation, finds that liver mesenchymal stromal cells have immunoregulatory qualities that make them more effective than similar cells derived from adipose, or fat, tissue and bone marrow. (2020-01-21)

Diabetes can independently lead to heart failure, population study shows
Heart problems are a common development for people with diabetes. In fact, about 33% of people in the US admitted to the hospital for heart failure also have diabetes. Heart failure may be the result of a co-condition, such as hypertension or coronary heart disease, but not always. (2020-01-02)

Study finds less-aggressive chemotherapy after initial treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer to be more beneficial
A Mayo Clinic study involving 5,540 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer finds that maintenance chemotherapy after initial treatment is more beneficial for patients whose disease is under control, compared with more aggressive treatment. (2019-12-19)

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