Current Compelling Evidence News and Events

Current Compelling Evidence News and Events, Compelling Evidence News Articles.
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Magnetic reversal 42,000 years ago triggered global environmental change
Nearly 42,000 years ago, when Earth's magnetic fields reversed, this triggered major environmental changes, extinction events, and long-term changes in human behavior, a new study reports. (2021-02-18)

What's the catch? Algal blooms influence fishing booms
The timing of phytoplankton blooms in the Red Sea could help determine next year's fish catch. (2021-02-10)

'Sleep hygiene' should be integrated into epilepsy diagnosis and management - study
Children with epilepsy sleep poorly compared to healthy children, and are more likely to experience disruptions such as night terrors, sleep walking or sleep disordered breathing, according to a new study. (2021-02-10)

Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes
Rain falls lightly on the ocean's surface. Marine mammals chirp and squeal as they swim along. The pounding of surf along a distant shoreline heaves and thumps with metronomic regularity. These are the sounds that most of us associate with the marine environment. But the soundtrack of the healthy ocean no longer reflects the acoustic environment of today's ocean, plagued with human-created noise. (2021-02-05)

Prostate drug associated with lower risk of Parkinson's disease
Taking a particular type of medication to treat enlarged prostate is associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a large observational study by researchers at the University of Iowa, and colleagues in Denmark and China. The findings, published in JAMA Neurology, suggest that terazosin, and similar medications, might have potential to prevent or delay the development of Parkinson's disease. (2021-02-01)

Using science to explore a 60-year-old Russian mystery
Researchers from EPFL and ETH Zurich have conducted an original scientific study that puts forth a plausible explanation for the mysterious 1959 death of nine hikers in the Ural Mountains in the former Soviet Union. The tragic Dyatlov Pass Incident, as it came to be called, has spawned a number of theories, from murderous Yeti to secret military experiments. (2021-01-28)

Hypnotic suggestions can make a complex task easy by helping vision fill in the blanks
New research demonstrates that hypnosis--the process of focusing a person's attention on a specific task or sensation--can turn a normally difficult visual task into a far easier one by helping individuals mentally ''fill in the gaps'' of missing visual cues. (2021-01-27)

Gastrointestinal surgery can be a cure for type 2 diabetes finds new long-term study
The results of a randomised clinical trial with the longest follow up to date show that metabolic surgery is more effective than medications and lifestyle interventions in the long-term control of severe type 2 diabetes. (2021-01-21)

Stop global roll out of 5G networks until safety is confirmed, urges expert
We should err on the side of caution and stop the global roll out of 5G (fifth generation) telecoms networks until we are certain this technology is completely safe, urges an expert in an opinion piece published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2021-01-18)

Gut microbes may antagonize or assist in anorexia
Anorexia is a debilitating eating disorder, and was long thought to be purely psychological. New research is challenging this by revealing that gut microbes may have a significant role in anorexia. A recent review examines the evidence that gut microbes can contribute to anorexia and may provide a new method to treat it. (2021-01-12)

Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that cells monitor for ribosome collisions to determine the severity of the problem and how best to respond when things start to go awry. (2020-12-17)

The ethics of human challenge trials
The first human challenge trial to test COVID-19 treatments and vaccines is set to begin in January in the United Kingdom. Daniel Hausman, a research professor at Rutgers Center for Population-Level Bioethics discussed the findings of his recently published paper in the Journal of Medicine & Philosophy examining ethical issues of challenge trials. (2020-12-09)

Drinking linked to a decline in brain health from cradle to grave
The evidence for the harmful effects of alcohol on brain health is compelling, but now experts have pin-pointed three key time periods in life when the effects of alcohol are likely to be at their greatest. (2020-12-03)

Team uses copper to image Alzheimer's aggregates in the brain
A proof-of-concept study conducted in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease offers new evidence that copper isotopes can be used to detect the amyloid-beta protein deposits that form in the brains of people living with -- or at risk of developing -- Alzheimer's. (2020-11-24)

A novel drug target for neonatal and infant heart failure
Researchers have identified a new druggable target for heart failure in neonates and infants. Approximately 60 percent of children born with congenital heart abnormalities will develop overt heart failure within the first year of life. The progression of heart failure in these infants is often rapid, with a high frequency of fatalities. Stimulation of this target significantly increased the cardiac contractility of newborns and infants in mice with few side effects. (2020-11-19)

Hydroxychloroquine does not help patients hospitalized with COVID-19: Study
Findings from a national study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) ''do not support'' the use of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

In mice, cadmium exposure during pregnancy linked to obesity in female offspring
In a mouse study aimed at modeling human exposure to the toxic metal cadmium, researchers found that female offspring of mice exposed to cadmium during pregnancy became obese in adulthood, developed fatty livers and could not process glucose normally. Male offspring were not affected in the same way. The study also sheds light on how cadmium exposure could affect mitochondrial function and developmental signaling pathways in the liver. (2020-11-12)

New study defines life cycle of a destructive plant pathogen 142 years after its discovery
''Using confocal and electron microscopic imaging, we provide compelling evidence to support the proposed life cycle of P. brassicae, making it more convincing and acceptable to the community,'' explained Liu. ''Notably, and most surprisingly, we discovered the existence of a sexual life stage of P. brassicae, starting from the fusion of two secondary zoospores within the infected epidermal cells.'' (2020-11-09)

Asian ethnicity strongly linked to COVID-related stroke
Asian ethnicity is strongly linked to COVID-related stroke, reveals an analysis of stroke centre activity in England and Scotland during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2020-11-05)

The National Human Genome Research Institute publishes new vision for human genomics
The National Human Genome Research Institute this week published its 'Strategic vision for improving human health at The Forefront of Genomics' in the journal Nature. This vision describes the most compelling research priorities and opportunities in human genomics for the coming decade, signaling a new era in genomics for the Institute and the field. (2020-10-28)

War songs and lullabies behind origins of music
Love is not the primary reason humans developed music. A new evolutionary theory of the origins of music argues more evidence supports music coming from the need for groups to impress allies and foes, and for parents to signal their attention to infants. They also argue against the theory that making music arose out of a need for social bonding, or that it is ''auditory cheesecake'' a fancy evolutionary byproduct with no purpose. (2020-10-26)

Body size of the extinct Megalodon indeed off the charts in the shark world
A new study shows that the body size of the iconic gigantic or megatooth shark, about 15 meters (50 feet) in length, is indeed anomalously large compared to body sizes of its relatives. (2020-10-05)

Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eaters - study
Scientists used single-cell genomics to show that two groups of poorly known marine protists routinely ingest viruses. They hypothesize that this serves to absorb phosphorus and nitrogen - that is, using viruses as food. This discovery has important implications for our understanding of oceanic food webs and carbon cycles. (2020-09-24)

Teens' social media use does not raise risk for depression: study
Contrary to popular wisdom, daily social media use is not a strong or consistent risk factor for depressive symptoms among adolescents, according to a new study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers. The results are published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. (2020-08-11)

Aspirin may accelerate progression of advanced cancers in older adults
For older adults with advanced cancer, initiating aspirin may increase their risk of disease progression and early death. (2020-08-10)

Body weight has surprising, alarming impact on brain function
Amsterdam and Costa Mesa, CA, August 5, 2020 - As a person's weight goes up, all regions of the brain go down in activity and blood flow, according to a new brain imaging study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-08-05)

Plate tectonics goes global
A research team led by Dr. WAN Bo from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics (IGG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has revealed that plate tectonics went global 2 billion years ago. (2020-08-05)

Replacing GDP with Gross Ecosystem Product reveals value of nature
Replacing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) with a new ''ecosystem'' measure reveals the enormous value of the natural world, new research shows. (2020-06-08)

New clues to deep earthquake mystery
A new understanding of our planet's deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth. (2020-05-27)

When plant pollen scarce, bumblebees biting leaves causes flowers to bloom early
Facing a scarcity of pollen, bumblebees will nibble on the leaves of flowerless plants, causing intentional damage in such a way that accelerates the production of flowers, according to a new study, which reports on a previously unknown behavior of bumblebees. (2020-05-21)

Half of moms-to-be at risk of preeclampsia are missing out on preventive aspirin
More than half of moms-to-be who are at risk of the dangerously high blood pressure condition, preeclampsia, are missing out on preventive aspirin treatment, says an expert in an editorial published online in Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin. (2020-05-21)

Three years of monitoring of Oregon's gray whales shows changes in health
Three years of 'health check-ups' on Oregon's summer resident gray whales shows a compelling relationship between whales' overall body condition and changing ocean conditions that likely limited availability of prey for the mammals. (2020-04-27)

A more balanced protein intake can reduce age-related muscle loss
Eating more protein at breakfast or lunchtime could help older people maintain muscle mass with advancing age -- but most people eat proteins fairly unevenly throughout the day, new research at the University of Birmingham has found. (2020-03-16)

Public health leaders call for coordinated communication response to COVID-19
On Thursday in the National Academy of Medicine's Perspectives, public health leaders including CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Distinguished Lecturer Scott Ratzan, MD called for informed and active public policy leadership to employ strategically coordinated health communication and outreach on COVID-19 and other emerging global health threats. (2020-03-05)

Study: PFAS Act similar to known cancer-causing chemicals
Scientists at the Environmental Working Group and Indiana University have for the first time conducted a review of 26 fluorinated chemicals, or PFAS, and found that all display at least one characteristic of known human carcinogens. (2020-03-03)

Antibiotics in animals: More research urgently needed
Resistance to antibiotics has been declared a global health emergency -- and it's not just humans who are impacted by this public health crisis. Antibiotics used in food-producing animals contribute to the development of bacteria that are resistant to treatment, impacting animal health and potentially human health. (2020-02-21)

The verdict is in: Courtrooms seldom overrule bad science
A new, multiyear study published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest (PSPI), a journal of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), finds that only 40% of the psychological assessment tools used in courts have been favorably rated by experts. Even so, lawyers rarely challenge their conclusions, and when they do, only one third of those challenges are successful. (2020-02-15)

New technologies, strategies expanding search for extraterrestrial life
New technologies that enable new strategies are revitalizing the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), by not only augmenting the traditional search for intelligently-generated radio signals but also allowing searches for other signs of life and technological activity. (2020-02-14)

Protein closely linked to commonest cause of blindness
An international team of scientists has identified a protein which is strongly linked to the commonest cause of blindness in developed countries when its levels are raised in the blood. (2020-02-07)

The benefits of physical activity for older adults
New findings published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports reveal how physically active older adults benefit from reduced risks of early death, breast and prostate cancer, fractures, recurrent falls, functional limitations, cognitive decline, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and depression. (2020-02-05)

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