Current Competence News and Events

Current Competence News and Events, Competence News Articles.
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Metabolism: Researchers first to shed light on structure of huge enzyme complex
A new method has enabled the natural structure of particularly large and complex enzymes to be revealed. Scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and TU Berlin have published their findings in the journal Cell Reports. They investigated a multi-enzyme complex that plays an essential role in metabolism and have discovered that it functions differently than previously thought. This will help scientists better understand certain diseases. (2021-02-10)

Voters perceive political candidates with a disability as qualified for elected office
Political candidates with a disability have historically been underrepresented. A new study has found for the first time that voters do not apply certain stereotypes associated with disability to such candidates. Voters see them as honest, hard-working, and concerned with social welfare issues. The results show that the cause of under-representation may not lay with voters' perceptions, but with a lack of support from governments and political parties. (2021-01-28)

Physicists develop record-breaking source for single photons
Researchers at the University of Basel and Ruhr University Bochum have developed a source of single photons that can produce billions of these quantum particles per second. With its record-breaking efficiency, the photon source represents a new and powerful building-block for quantum technologies. (2021-01-28)

New study identifies bird species that could spread ticks and Lyme disease
A new study published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography used machine learning to identify bird species with the potential to transmit the Lyme disease bacterium (Borrelia burgdorferi) to feeding ticks. The team developed a model that identified birds known to spread Lyme disease with 80% accuracy and flagged 21 new species that should be prioritized for surveillance. (2021-01-27)

For older adults, specific Facebook activities more important than overall use
The actions that older adults take on Facebook may be more important to their user experience and well-being than their overall use of the site, according to researchers. In a study conducted by a team that included researchers from Penn State, older adults experienced different levels of competence, relatedness and autonomy on Facebook based on the types of their activities on the site. (2021-01-26)

CHEOPS finds unique planetary system
The CHEOPS space telescope detects six planets orbiting the star TOI-178. Five of the planets are in a harmonic rhythm despite very different compositions - a novelty. CHEOPS is a joint mission by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Switzerland, under the aegis of the University of Bern in collaboration with the University of Geneva. (2021-01-25)

Childhood intervention can prevent 'deaths of despair'
Mortality rates among young adults are rising in the US due in part to 'deaths of despair' -- preventable deaths from suicide, drug overdoses and alcohol-related liver disease. An intensive childhood intervention program called Fast Track could help reduce these deaths by reducing risky behaviors in adolescence and young adulthood, finds new research from Duke University and the Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (2020-12-17)

A pair of lonely planet-like objects born like stars
An international research team led by the University of Bern has discovered an exotic binary system composed of two young planet-like objects, orbiting around each other from a very large distance. Although these objects look like giant exoplanets, they formed in the same way as stars, proving that the mechanisms driving star formation can produce rogue worlds in unusual systems deprived of a Sun. (2020-12-16)

St. Edward's University study finds a manly beard may help drive sales
Business researchers conducted five studies to test the ''power of the beard,'' predicting that the beard would be an advantage in sales and service roles. The studies examined the beard's effect on perception of expertise, trustworthiness, likelihood of sales and service satisfaction. Their findings are published online in the Journal of Business Research in their article titled, ''It Grows on You: Perceptions of sales/service personnel with facial hair.'' (2020-12-15)

Call for 'debt driving licence'
People borrowing money for the first time should only be given small amounts until they have proved their competence, a new study says. (2020-11-27)

Single-cell technique could provide 'egg health' indicators
Using the power of single-cell analysis, researchers at the Babraham Institute have assessed the effects of age on egg cells (oocytes) in mice, particularly looking to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that relate to reduced developmental competence. The knowledge uncovered by this research provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying egg quality and is relevant to the development of techniques to assess the quality of human egg cells, an area of growing importance as the use of fertility treatments increases. (2020-11-18)

Children misdiagnosed with "impairment of language acquisition"
Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German. Those who our experiencing difficulty in learning the second language are often diagnosed as having a suspected ''impairment of language acquisition''. In fact, this often merely reflects the fact that they have not yet fully acquired the second language. (2020-11-16)

Slow-living animal species could be disease 'reservoirs'
Animals that live slowly - breeding less rapidly and living longer - could be ''reservoirs'' of diseases that could jump to new species including humans, new research suggests. (2020-11-09)

New study by ESMT Berlin shows political commitment increasingly important for CEOs
Political and social engagement is a relevant topic for European business leaders. CEOs are increasingly making public statements on political issues in order to make a positive contribution to socially relevant topics. These are the findings of a recent study at ESMT Berlin. (2020-11-02)

Two planets around a red dwarf
The 'SAINT-EX' Observatory, led by scientists from the National Centre of Competence in Research NCCR PlanetS of the University of Bern and the University of Geneva, has detected two exoplanets orbiting the star TOI-1266. The Mexico-based telescope thus demonstrates its high precision and takes an important step in the quest of finding potentially habitable worlds. (2020-10-16)

Donors more likely to give to COVID causes when font matches message
Appeals seeking donations to help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic were more successful when the typeface in which the appeal was written mirrored the tone of the donation request, a new study has found. (2020-10-06)

Boosting public trust in scientists hangs on communications methods
According to Geah Pressgrove, of West Virginia University, scientists and communications professionals need to rethink how they communicate through four distinct dimensions of trust: competence, integrity, benevolence and openness. (2020-09-28)

Scholars untangle marketing's complex role in understanding political activities
This month's special issue of the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing acknowledges the role that marketing does and can play in addressing political activities with articles that explore key topics like elections, voting, corporate political advocacy, and consumer political identities. (2020-09-25)

Older the person, higher the self-esteem: age differences in self-esteem in Japan
Self-esteem, or the value one assigns oneself, changes through life. Studies from western countries report a decline in self-esteem post-60 years, but studies in Japan have not sufficiently explored this, owing to partial perspectives on self-esteem and not investigating people aged 70 and older. Now, a new study by Japanese researchers examines the relationship of self-esteem with age and presents an analysis of web-based surveys, expanding our understanding of self-esteem. (2020-09-24)

Prior abortion does not negatively affect feelings of parental competence
A recent study found that a prior induced abortion did not negatively impact a woman's psychological well-being or her thoughts about her competence as a parent when she later became a mother. (2020-09-23)

Russian chemists proposed a new design of flow batteries
Redox flow batteries are promising long-term energy storage devices in smart power grids. Scientists from Mendeleev University, IPCP RAS and other institutes have proposed a new design of RFB with flow plates made from graphite foil by laser cutting procedure. It will simplify and reduce the cost of research and help to unleash the full potential of new technology. The research article was published in the journal ChemPlusChem. (2020-08-18)

Research suggests bias against natural hair limits job opportunities for black women
New research suggests Black women with natural hairstyles, such as curly afros, braids or twists, are often perceived as less professional than Black women with straightened hair. (2020-08-12)

Patient experiences in medical imaging and radiation therapy: The importance of skilled patient care professionals
I went into the MRI bracing for the wave of panic I knew would come as soon as I was strapped down and inside the machine.'' In ''A Tale of Two MRIs'' by patient Lelainia Lloyd, her experiences--good and bad--are shared as part of an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, published by Elsevier. (2020-08-10)

Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting
The tension in the membrane of cells plays an important role in a number of biological processes. A localised drop in tension makes it easier for the surface to be bending inward and form invaginations that will become free vesicles inside the cell. Are the functions of these so-called endosomes also modulated by variations in tension? Scientists have answered in the affirmative thanks to a high-precision research, using molecular probes. (2020-08-03)

Brain builds and uses maps of social networks, physical space, in the same way
Even in these social-distanced days, we keep in our heads a map of our relationships with other people: family, friends, coworkers and how they relate to each other. New research from the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis shows that we put together this social map in much the same way that we assemble a map of physical places and things. (2020-07-22)

New candidate for raw material synthesis through gene transfer
Cyanobacteria hardly need any nutrients and use the energy of sunlight. Bathers are familiar with these microorganisms as they often occur in waters. A group of researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has discovered that the multicellular species Phormidium lacuna can be genetically modified by natural transformation and could thus produce substances such as ethanol or hydrogen. They present their results in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone. 0234440). (2020-07-02)

Responses to cyberbullying
It is well-known that victims of bullying can have higher risks of future health and social problems. However, different victims experience a broad range of responses and some may not suffer at all. Researchers felt this implied there might be factors that could protect against some consequences of bullying. In a study of over 6,000 adolescents in Japan, they found a strong candidate in the moderation of what is known as emotional competence. (2020-06-29)

Gender bias kept alive by people who think it's dead
Workplace gender bias is being kept alive by people who think it's no longer an issue, new research suggests. (2020-06-26)

To make a good impression, leave cell phone alone during work meetings
New hires especially should keep their cell phones stashed away during business meetings, a new study strongly implies. Two University of Kansas researchers have just published a paper that finds viewers perceive someone who appears to be using their cell phone during a business meeting far more negatively than someone who takes notes on a pad. (2020-06-17)

Novel DNA analysis will help to identify food origin and counterfeit food in the future
Estonian scientists are developing a DNA-based method of analysis that enables them to identify food components and specify the origin of a foodstuff. (2020-06-09)

Editorial: COVID-19 pandemic likely to result in lasting changes to medical school curricula
Following disruptions to medical education that the COVID-19 pandemic brought to the United States this spring, 'a return to a typical pre-COVID-19 teaching platform is unlikely,' say Diane Wayne and colleagues in this Editorial. (2020-06-05)

Increased usability and precision in vascular imaging
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments. (2020-05-26)

People think robots are pretty incompetent and not funny, new study says
Detecting gender bias against robots was the original intent of a study that revealed two surprises: The gender bias didn't appear. In its place, people were predisposed to find robots mostly incompetent -- no matter the gender. (2020-05-05)

Malaria risk is highest in early evening, study finds
Wide-scale use of insecticide-treated bed nets has led to substantial declines in global incidences of malaria in recent years. As a result, mosquitos have been shifting their biting times to earlier in the evening and later in the morning. In a new study, an international team of researchers has found that mosquitoes are most likely to transmit malaria in the early evening, when people are exposed, then at midnight, when people are protected by bed nets, or in the morning. (2020-05-04)

How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. In a Review publishing March 30 in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Andreas Nieder, a neurobiologist at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, explores the current literature on how different animal species comprehend numbers and the impact on their survival, arguing that we won't fully understand the influence of numerical competence unless we study it directly. (2020-03-30)

Brain or muscles, what do we lose first?
From the age of 50, there is a decline not just in physical activity but also in cognitive abilities since the two are correlated. But which of them influences the other? Researchers (UNIGE) used a database of over 100,000 people aged 50-90 whose physical and cognitive abilities were measured every two years for 12 years. The findings show that cognitive abilities ward off inactivity much more than physical activity prevents the decline in cognitive abilities. (2020-03-24)

Like patching a flat tire: New fix heals herniated discs
A new two-step technique to repair herniated discs uses hyaluronic acid gel to re-inflate the disc and collagen gel to seal the hole, essentially repairing ruptured discs like you'd repair a flat tire. (2020-03-11)

Collaborating with a team of rivals can resolve conflict -- and advance science
Five social scientists holed up in an Amsterdam hotel for a week with the goal of reaching a scientific consensus on how people form stereotypes. They emerged with a joint theory paper, which they published as a how-to guide March 9 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2020-03-09)

Don't blame the messenger -- unless it's all stats and no story
In some cases of ineffective messaging, it might be appropriate, despite the aphorism to the contrary, to blame the messenger. ''Our findings suggest that telling stories when communicating can make the speaker appear more warm and trustworthy, as opposed to... providing only statistics and figures,'' says UB researcher (2020-03-06)

Anti-evolution drug could stop antibiotic resistance
The spread of antibiotic resistance is partly due to the ability of bacteria to pick up DNA from their surroundings. A new study, which started at the University of Groningen, showed that drugs blocking this ability in the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae can indeed stop the spread of resistance in mice. As competence is blocked without affecting cell growth, it will be difficult for the bacteria to evolve resistance to the blockade. (2020-03-03)

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