Current Competition News and Events

Current Competition News and Events, Competition News Articles.
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Setting hospital prices would save more than increasing competition or price transparency
Spending on hospital services is the largest health spending category in the U.S., accounting for one-third of national health expenses. A new study finds that among strategies to curb hospital prices among the commercially insured population in the U.S., direct price regulations such as setting rates are likely to achieve greater savings than other approaches like increasing competition or improving price transparency. (2021-02-18)

Clues for improving sleep in visually impaired athletes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that approximately one-third of a group of visually impaired athletes had sleep disorders. A later wake-up time and stress regarding interpersonal relationships in competition activities were related to the rate of sleep disorders. Addressing these factors may be key in improving sleep quality in this population. (2021-02-14)

Winner-takes-all synthetic gene circuit process opens new pathways to disease treatment
Multicellular synthetic circuits will be a much more effective way to treat cancer. (2021-02-08)

Chimpanzee friends fight together to battle rivals
Humans cooperate with each other in large groups to defend territories or wage war. But what underlies the evolution of this kind of cooperation? Researchers at the Max PIanck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Harvard University show that there may be a link between social bonds and participation in large-scale cooperation: Chimpanzees join their close bond partners when fighting rivals. In humans, too, social bonds may have been essential to the evolution of cooperative abilities. (2021-01-22)

High-ranking male hyenas have better chances with females because they are less "stressed"
Scientists from the Leibniz-IZW have found that interacting with other males is more ''stressful'' for low-ranking than for high-ranking male spotted hyenas. This restricts the time and energy low-ranking males can invest in courting females and is therefore a key factor for lower reproductive success than their high-ranking rivals. This mechanism seems to be more important in determining the number and quality of offspring than physical traits such as attractiveness and fighting ability. (2021-01-18)

Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success
Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows. (2021-01-15)

Archaeology: sharing leftover meat may have contributed to early dog domestication
Humans feeding leftover lean meat to wolves during harsh winters may have had a role in the early domestication of dogs, towards the end of the last ice age (14,000 to 29,000 years ago), according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2021-01-07)

Global study on bird song frequency
Competition for mates leads to a deeper voice than expected based on size (2020-12-22)

Skinnier but resilient geese thriving in the high Arctic
Barnacle geese in the Arctic have been on a diet. So many now migrate to northern breeding grounds that in some places there's less food to go around. The good news is that it doesn't seem to restrict their population growth -- yet. (2020-12-17)

Fishing alters fish behaviour and features in exploited ecosystems
Not all specimens of the same species are the same: there is a marked variability within the same population and sometimes these morphological differences are translated into a different behaviour. (2020-12-16)

Elite soccer players help define normal heart measures in competitive athletes
Analyses of professional soccer players' heart test results provide insights on athletes' cardiac structure and function. The hearts of elite soccer players frequently exhibit electrical and structural patterns that are above guideline-defined normal ranges. (2020-12-16)

Biologists clarify how three species of cephalopods coexist in the Arctic
By analyzing the content of stable heavy isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in the beaks, the researchers studied three closely related cephalopod species: the highly boreal Rossia megaptera, the wide-boreal-Arctic Rossia palpebrosa, and the Arctic endemic Rossia moelleri, which are sympatric in the Arctic. (2020-12-15)

Measurements of tree height can help cycad conservation decisions
A multi-national research team has exploited long-term data sets that span 2001 to 2018 to reveal the utility of tree height quantifications in informing conservation decisions of an arborescent cycad species. The field work was led by the University of Guam and targeted Cycas micronesica from the Micronesian Islands of Guam, Tinian, and Yap as the model species. (2020-12-07)

Researchers develop virus live stream to study virus infection
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University developed an advanced technique that makes it possible to monitor a virus infection live. The researchers from the groups of Tanenbaum and Van Kuppeveld expect that the technique can be used to study a wide variety of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. The technique named VIRIM is very valuable for gaining insights in virus infection in the human body, which can lead to more targeted treatments. (2020-11-13)

A new mathematical front to understand species coexistence
In an effort to understand how different species coexist, researchers develop a mathematical model that establishes interactions in co-colonization as the key. The study, published in the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, links epidemiology, ecology and evolution and models host colonization by different microbial species, providing fundamental advances for the analysis of species coexistence and the understanding of biodiversity. (2020-11-03)

Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
New research shows that as species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change. (2020-10-19)

Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy? A study carried out at the University of Geneva reveals that people who support immigration are ready and willing to adopt an empathetic approach and a wider perspective. By contrast, when opponents of immigration are asked to engage in perspective taking, they feel more competition with their ''adversary.'' (2020-10-14)

Invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities
New research led by University of Konstanz ecologists reveals invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities and identifies the soil microbiome as a major driver of invasion success. (2020-10-05)

How to better understand what makes a virus win during transmission?
The framework, published in Frontiers in Microbiology, was applied on transmission data of the influenza virus, and offers to be a new tool for anticipating the consequences of microbial diversity and optimizing disease control measures. (2020-09-25)

Princeton scientists explaining how diverse species coexist in microbial communities
In their paper appearing September 11, 2020 in the journal eLife, Princeton researchers Amir Erez, Jaime Lopez, Ned Wingreen and colleagues use mathematical modeling to explore how species diversity in a bacterial community is affected when the nutrients the microbes depend upon are only seasonally available. (2020-09-16)

Heated rivalries for pollinators among arctic plants
Insect pollination is as important to Arctic plants as it is to plants further south. When flowers abound, the plants have to compete for pollinators. Researchers at the University of Helsinki reveal that higher temperatures cause the flowering periods of different plant species to pile up in time. As a consequence, climate change may affect the competitive relationships of plants. (2020-09-11)

Smart responsive lasing signals for high-security optical encryption
Very recently, Professor Yong Sheng Zhao's group in the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences propose a strategy to achieve multiple responsive lasing emission states for high-security optical encryption by modulating the competition between radiative rate of donor and the rate of energy transfer in FRET microlasers, which is published in National Science Review. (2020-08-21)

Swans reserve aggression for each other
Swans display more aggression to fellow swans than other birds, new research shows. (2020-08-18)

Species competition and cooperation influence vulnerability to climate change
Organisms need to work together to adapt to climate change, especially in the presence of competitors, suggests a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-18)

The (neuro)science of getting and staying motivated
Neuroscientists at EPFL and the University of Edinburgh have discovered that the degree of motivation and the stamina to keep it up depends on the ratio between the neurotransmitters glutamine and glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of the brain. (2020-08-12)

COVID-19 crisis exposes imbalance in EU state aid for aviation sector
Dr Steven Truxal, an aviation law expert in The City Law School, says state aid offered to airlines in response to the current crisis raises questions around unfair competition between European carriers and may be the subject of future challenge by carriers outside the EU. (2020-08-07)

Bargaining and the three-way transaction defines the daily deal market
If you've ever taken advantage of a nice discount thanks to a promotion from Groupon or LivingSocial, you've tapped the power of the daily deal market yourself. You, the consumer, benefited from the prior bargaining that took place between that big online platform and the merchant, resulting in a lower price for you. (2020-08-03)

Cell competition in the thymus is crucial in a healthy organism
The study published in Cell Reports demonstrates that the development of T lymphocytes lays on the coordination of signals followed by cells in order to ensure the maintenance of a healthy organism. The cells identified in the study integrate information regarding the needs of more mature cells and define their own development accordingly: adjusting the speed of the production of T lymphocytes and purging the system of other less efficient cells, that tend to cause leukemia. (2020-07-30)

New study takes closer look at how environment affects daily life of sloths
Scientists studying brown-throated three-toed sloths, where predators are extinct and food is more accessible, have found that the animals adapt to have a primarily diurnal, or daytime, schedule. (2020-07-21)

COVID-19 'price gouging' could be prevented
Excessive pricing or 'price gouging' of essential hygiene and medical products during the current global pandemic could be prevented, claims a new paper from the University of Portsmouth. (2020-07-15)

HKU study reveals the hidden fight within corals
Researchers from the School of Biological Sciences and Swire Institute of Marine Science at the University of Hong Kong are working to understand how the coral symbiosis may respond to global warming through changes in their microbiome, specifically their symbiotic algae. Using a newly developed method they revealed , which may be a determining factor in the sucthe metabolic function of algae changes in response to competition with other speciescess or failure of certain host-symbiont combinations. (2020-07-08)

Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions
Athletes who play contact sports are being particularly hard-hit by the prolonged restrictions imposed on games and training, according to a new study. (2020-07-06)

Order from noise: How randomness and collective dynamics define a stem cell
Without stem cells, human life would not exist. Due to them, a lump of cells becomes an organ, and a fertilized egg develops into a baby. But what actually makes a stem cell? Are these a stable population of specially gifted cells? Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria discovered that instead, stem cells might emerge due to the collective behavior of cells within the organs. (2020-07-06)

Crystal wars
Scientists at The University of Tokyo and Fudan University researched the process of crystallization in which competing structural forms coexist. By compensating for fluctuations, they were able to more accurately describe the process that determines the final crystalline form. This work may help industrial chemists design new methods. (2020-07-01)

Tennis: Losers move their heads more often than winners
Those sudden tantrums displayed on court by former US tennis player John McEnroe are legendary - but so too are those of Nick Kyrgios, Alexander Zverev, Serena Williams and Co. And their tennis rackets certainly bear witness to that! Emotions and nonverbal movement behaviour are closely linked processes. Up till now however, there has been insufficient knowledge about the spontaneous nonverbal expressions in response to the experience of positive and negative emotions, i.e. when winning or losing a sports competition. (2020-06-29)

'Spear and shield' inspire high toughness microstructure
Researchers designed a discontinuous fibrous Bouligand (DFB) architecture and tested the 3D-printed single-edge notched specimens with such architecture for optimization parameter. (2020-06-28)

How sexual competition and choice could protect species from extinction
New research shows that removing sexual competition and choice through enforced monogamy creates populations that are less resilient to environmental stress, such as climate change. The research team looked at how flour beetles coped with environmental and genetic stress after they had evolved under monogamous versus polyandrous mating patterns. The researchers say that their findings should apply to any species that reproduces sexually, experiences some degree of sexual selection, and faces environmental stress. (2020-06-18)

Do you want a cheerleader or a critic? The Voice shows how we really choose our mentors.
We think that we will choose our personal and professional advisors based on reasoned criteria about their expertise, competence and experience. In practice, we go more with our gut than our head, choosing the person who shows enthusiasm for us and our goals. A team of researchers has used the popular singing competition show The Voice to prove it. (2020-06-11)

In chimpanzees, females contribute to the protection of the territory
Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, extensively studied several neighboring groups of western chimpanzees and their findings reveal that females and even the entire group may play a more important role in between-group competition than previously thought. They found that even though adult males seem important in territory increase, territory maintenance and competitive advantage over neighbors act through the entire group in this population of chimpanzees in the Taï National Park. (2020-05-27)

Newspapers report on car safety recalls less when manufacturers advertise more with them
A new study looked at the relationship between advertising by car manufacturers in US newspapers and news coverage of car safety recalls in the early 2000s. The study found that newspapers provided less coverage of recalls issued by manufacturers that advertised more regularly in their publications than of recalls issued by other manufacturers that did not advertise, and this occurred more frequently when the recalls involved more severe defects. (2020-05-21)

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