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Current Competition News and Events, Competition News Articles.
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Changes needed to prevent controversial pharmaceutical deals
New research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) recommends changes to the system which sees drug companies strike deals with competitors to stop them producing cheaper generic alternatives. (2020-05-21)

Supercomputer model simulations reveal cause of Neanderthal extinction
IBS climate scientists discover that according to new supercomputer model simulations, only competition between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens can explain the rapid demise of Neanderthals around 43 to 38 thousand years ago. (2020-05-20)

Study: Women entrepreneurs are more motivated by social impact than money
A new study from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Columbia sheds light on the attributes that drive different types of entrepreneurs. By examining how entrepreneurs responded to motivation-related messages that involve money and social impact, the researchers concluded that women and people in altruistic cultures are more motivated by messages of social impact than by those related to money while men and people in less altruistic cultures are more motivated by messages related to money. (2020-05-20)

Self-isolating? Get fit faster with multi-ghost racing
Eager to ramp up your fitness while stuck at home? A new generation of virtual reality (VR) exergames nudges home-based cyclists to perform a lot better by immersing them in a crowd of cyclists. And as all cyclists participating in the race are versions of the flesh-and-blood player, the Covid-19 norms of social distancing are maintained even in the parallel universe of VR. (2020-05-19)

A new concept of designing photocatalytic systems with reversed configurations
A reversed configuration of photocatalysts with a core/shell structure of microsized Mo2N cocatalysts and nanosized CdS photocatalysts exhibits superior solar hydrogen production. Compared to the conventional configuration with nanosized Mo2N cocatalysts deposited on the surface of CdS, the reversed configuration outperforms the conventional one in light absorption, charge separation and surface catalysis and avoids the competition of light absorption by cocatalysts and makes an effective confinement effect to promote the surface catalysis of Mo2N. (2020-05-12)

Considering how many firms can meet pollutant standards can spur green tech development
A new study developed a model of regulation in which the probability of a stricter standard being enacted increased with the proportion of firms in an industry that could meet the standard. The study found that regulations that consider the proportion of firms that can meet the new standard can motivate the development of a new green technology more effectively than regulations that do not consider this factor. (2020-05-05)

What protects minority languages from extinction?
A new study by Jean-Marc Luck from Paris and Anita Mehta from Oxford published in EPJ B, uses mathematical modelling to suggest two mechanisms through which majority and minority languages come to coexist in the same area. (2020-04-22)

Parasite carried by grey squirrels negatively impacts red squirrel behavior
Research published in the Journal of Animal Ecology reveals a new mechanism of how grey squirrels affect native red squirrels in Europe through parasite-mediated competition. (2020-04-16)

FSU research shows guppies help their brothers when it comes to the opposite se
In a new study published by a Florida State University team, researchers found that male Trinidadian guppies observe a form of nepotism when it comes to pursuing the opposite sex. These tiny tropical fish often help their brothers in the mating process by darting in front of other males to block access to a female. (2020-03-26)

More men, more problems? Not necessarily, FSU study finds
Men are more prone to competitive risk taking and violent behavior, so what happens when the number of men is greater than the number of women in a population? According to research by Florida State University Professor of Psychology Jon Maner, the answers might not be what you expect. (2020-03-24)

Love rivals risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations
Males that face tougher competition for females risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations in their genome than males without rivals. Researchers at Uppsala University have discovered this correlation in the beetle species Callosobruchus maculatus. Their study is published in the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-03-16)

Disease-causing virus manipulates crop plants to favor its vector
The virus that causes barley yellow dwarf, the most widespread disease of cereal crops, manipulates its host plant and insect vector to promote its own survival, according to an international team of researchers. The group found that the virus raises the temperature of its host plants along with the heat-tolerance of its aphid vectors to create regions on the plants where aphids can feed free from competing insects. The findings could have implications for crop health as the global climate warms. (2020-03-10)

Sweet beaks: What Galapagos finches and marine bacteria have in common
Ecological niches are a concept well known from higher animals. Apparently, bacteria act accordingly. Researchers from the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have found that marine Polaribacter bacteria find their ecological niche by specializing on their favorite sugar. They now present their results in ISME Journal. (2020-02-19)

Researchers discover new mechanism for the coexistence of species
Researchers from AMOLF (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) and Harvard University (USA) show how the ability of organisms to move around plays a role in stabilizing ecosystems. In their paper published Feb. 19, 2020, in Nature, they describe how the competition between 'movers' and 'growers' leads to a balance in which both types of bacteria can continue to exist alongside each other. (2020-02-19)

How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution
Since its inception in 1867, The American Naturalist has maintained its position as one of the world's premier peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and behavior research. Its goals are to publish articles that are of broad interest to the readership, pose new and significant problems, introduce novel subjects, develop conceptual unification, and change the way people think. AmNat emphasizes sophisticated methodologies and innovative theoretical syntheses--all in an effort to advance the knowledge of organic evolution and other broad biological principles. (2020-02-17)

Our memory prefers essence over form
What clues does our memory use to connect a current situation to a situation from the past? The researchers (UNIGE) have demonstrated that similarities in structure and essence guide our recollections rather than surface similarities. It is only when individuals lack sufficient knowledge that they turn to the surface clues to recollect a situation. These results are relevant in the field of education. They underline the need to focus on the conceptual aspects of situations. (2020-02-14)

Increasing number of grocery stores in some areas could reduce food waste up to 9%
Food waste is a big problem in the United States. According to the US Department of Agriculture, food waste is estimated at between 30-40 percent of the food supply. New research in the INFORMS journal Manufacturing & Service Operations Management finds that increasing the number of grocery stores in certain areas can drastically decrease waste. (2020-02-12)

What is the best way to encourage innovation? Competitive pay may be the answer
Economists and business leaders agree that innovation is a major force behind economic growth, but many disagree on what is the best way to encourage workers to produce the 'think-outside-of-the-box' ideas that create newer and better products and services. New research from the University of California San Diego indicates that competitive 'winner-takes-all' pay structures are most effective in getting the creative juices flowing that help fuel economic growth. (2020-02-12)

Not everything is ferromagnetic in high magnetic fields
High magnetic fields have a potential to modify the microscopic arrangement of magnetic moments because they overcome interactions existing in zero field. Usually, high fields exceeding a certain critical value force the moments to align in the same direction as the field leading to ferromagnetic arrangement. However, a recent study showed that this is not always the case. The experiments took place at the high-field magnet at HZB's neutron source BER II. (2020-02-10)

Conflict between ranchers and wildlife intensifies as climate change worsens in Chile
As Chile becomes drier due to climate change, new research has found ranchers are coming into conflict with guanacos who compete for pasture with livestock. (2020-02-06)

Is human cooperativity an outcome of competition between cultural groups?
A study by ASU researchers looks at how culture may have fueled our capacity to cooperate with strangers. The idea is that culturally different groups compete, causing the spread of traits that give groups a competitive edge. (2020-02-04)

Cave fights for food: Voracious spiders vs. assassin bugs
Killing and eating of potential competitors has rarely been documented in the zoological literature, even though this type of interaction can affect population dynamics. In a recent publication in the open-access journal Subterranean Biology, Brazilian scientists presented their notes regarding the predation of an assassin bug by a spider in neotropical caves. Underground, where food resources are scarce, such events might be possible as a result of ecological pressures imposed by the hostile environment, hypothesize the researchers. (2020-01-20)

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome
Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. In their recent study published in Ecology Letters, Sylvia Cremer and her research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) revealed that collective care-giving has the power to bias the outcome of coinfections in fungus-exposed colony members. (2020-01-17)

Diabolical points in coupled active cavities with quantum emitters
Diabolical points (DPs) introduce ways to study topological phase and peculiar energy dispersion. Scientists in China and cooperators from the United Kingdom demon-strated DPs in strongly coupled active microdisks. A new macroscopical control of backscattering based on the competition between defects and quantum emitters was used to achieve DPs. This work paves the way to integrate DPs and more exotic phe-nomena into quantum information process with quantum emitters and will inspire fur-ther research with DPs. (2020-01-15)

Male songbirds can't survive on good looks alone, says a new study
Brightly colored male songbirds not only have to attract the female's eye, but also make sure their sperm can last the distance, according to new research. (2020-01-15)

Prostate cancer can now be diagnosed better using artificial intelligence
Researchers at Radboud university medical center have developed a 'deep learning' system that is better than most pathologists at determining the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. The AI system, which uses tissue samples to arrive at its diagnosis, taught itself to identify prostate cancer based on data from over 1200 patients. The Radboud team is now working with researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and Kaggle, a Google subsidiary, with the intention to continue developing these methods as part of a major international competition. (2020-01-09)

Less offspring due to territorial conflicts
Territorial conflicts can turn violent in humans and chimpanzees, two extremely territorial species. An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has studied the effects of territoriality on female reproductive success in wild Western chimpanzees and found that high neighbor pressure at times when females typically reproduce can lead to reproductive delays with longer intervals between births. Having many males in a group, however, is of advantage and speeds up reproduction. (2020-01-03)

MRI predict intelligence levels in children?
A group of researchers from the Skoltech Center for Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) took 4th place in the international MRI-based adolescent intelligence prediction competition. For the first time ever, the Skoltech scientists used ensemble methods based on deep learning 3D networks to deal with this challenging prediction task. The results of their study were published in the journal Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Neurocognitive Prediction. (2019-12-27)

Bochum team wins second place in machine-learning competition
With their algorithm for material-property prediction, Dr. Yury Lysogorskiy and Dr. Thomas Hammerschmidt of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation Icams of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) won the second place in an international competition on machine learning. The secret of their success was the combination of data analytics with physical models and with properties of the chemical elements that potential materials for solar cells and touchscreens are made of. (2019-12-19)

Moongoose females compete over reproduction
A new study on wild banded mongooses reveals that females may use spontaneous abortion to cope with reproductive competition, and to save their energy for future breeding attempts in better conditions. (2019-12-13)

Hire more LGBTQ and disabled astronomers or risk falling behind, review finds
In a paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, Professor Lisa Kewley, director of the ARC Centre of Excellence in All Sky Astrophysics (ASTRO 3D), finds that encouraging astronomers from marginalized communities will increase the chances of significant research discoveries. (2019-12-06)

Gene discovery in fruit flies could help search for new treatments for mitochondrial disease
Scientists have identified a protein in fruit flies that can be targeted to reverse the effects of disease-causing mutations in mitochondrial genes. The discovery could provide clues about how to counteract human mitochondrial diseases, for which there is currently no cure. (2019-11-27)

Get your game face on: Study finds it may help
Could putting on a serious face in preparation for competition actually impact performance? According to a new study published in Stress and Health by experimental psychology researchers at UT, there may be substance to game face. (2019-11-14)

Study raises new warnings about frail surgery patients
A Veterans Affairs study has shown that frail surgery patients may be at higher risk than previously thought, leading the researchers to conclude that 'there are no 'low-risk' procedures among frail patients.' (2019-11-13)

Research highlights importance of crop competition as a weed control strategy
A new study featured in the journal Weed Science points to the formidable weed control challenges faced by growers today. Weeds have developed resistance to many existing herbicide options, and new herbicide discoveries have plummeted. As a result, nonchemical approaches are growing in importance. (2019-11-04)

Best of frenemies: Unexpected role of social networks in ecology
Social networking, even between competing species, plays a much bigger role in ecology than anyone previously thought, according to three biologists at UC Davis. (2019-11-01)

Study finds companies may be wise to share cybersecurity efforts
Research finds that when one company experiences a cybersecurity breach, other companies in the same field also become less attractive to investors. However, companies that are open about their cybersecurity risk management fare significantly better than peers that don't disclose their cybersecurity efforts. (2019-10-29)

To rid electric grid of carbon, shore up green energy support
Cornell and Northwestern University engineers, along with a federal economist, have created an energy model that helps to remove carbon-generated power from the US electric grid -- replacing it with a greener, financially feasible wind, solar and hydro energy system. (2019-10-28)

Charta of Neurourbanism dedicated to mental health in cities
How can planners reduce the stress of city living and improve the mental health of city dwellers? An interdisciplinary team of researchers led by Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has developed a set of recommendations which aim to address these questions. Entitled 'The Charta of Neurourbanism', their work has been published to coincide with the Berlin Mental Health Week. (2019-10-25)

As large chains grow to dominate dialysis, patient outcomes decline
As large, for-profit dialysis chains acquired more than 1,200 smaller providers across the U.S. from 1998 to 2010, they cut skilled medical staff, increased patient volumes, altered drug regimens and adopted other practices that hurt patient health, according to new research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. (2019-10-23)

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