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Current Computed Tomography News and Events, Computed Tomography News Articles.
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New insight into how brain neurons influence choices
By studying animals choosing between two drink options, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the activity of certain neurons in the brain leads directly to the choice of one option over another. The findings could lead to better understanding of how decision-making goes wrong in conditions such as addiction and depression. (2020-11-02)

Lung scans for stroke patients could provide earlier COVID-19 detection
Examination of the lungs via computed tomography angiogram (CTA) scans helped researchers screen for and detect COVID-19 earlier than traditional nasal swab tests in acute stroke patients. Using CTA scan results in combination with COVID-19 symptom questionnaires, researchers were able to detect COVID-19 with 83% accuracy. (2020-10-29)

Lost and found: UH geologists 'resurrect' missing tectonic plate
A team of geologists at the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics believes they have found the lost plate known as Resurrection in northern Canada by using existing mantle tomography images. (2020-10-20)

Results from the FORECAST Trial reported at TCT Connect
In the FORECAST randomized clinical trial, the use of fractional flow reserve management derived from computed tomography (FFRCT) did not significantly reduce costs but did reduce the use of invasive coronary angiography (ICA). (2020-10-16)

Assessing state of the art in AI for brain disease treatment
The range of AI technologies available for dealing with brain disease is growing fast, and exciting new methods are being applied to brain problems as computer scientists gain a deeper understanding of the capabilities of advanced algorithms. In APL Bioengineering, Italian researchers conducted a systematic literature review to understand the state of the art in the use of AI for brain disease. Their qualitative review sheds light on the most interesting corners of AI development. (2020-10-14)

Scientists reconstruct beetles from the Cretaceous
An international research team led by the University of Bonn (Germany) and Palacky University (Czech Republic) has examined four newly found specimens of the Mysteriomorphidae beetle using computer tomography and has been able to reconstruct them. The results allow to draw conclusions about the evolution of the species during the Cretaceous period. The study has been published in the journal ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-10-08)

Coupling antibiotics with stem cells to fight off bone infections
Researchers from Kanazawa University investigated the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) loaded with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on osteomyelitis caused by implants. By administering ADSC-loaded ciprofloxacin to the site of bone infection in rats, the researchers found a significant improvement of the infection, as shown by reduced soft tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone degradation. These findings suggest a potential new therapy for implant-related bone infections that have traditionally been difficult to treat with antibiotics. (2020-10-01)

Study highlights lack of evidence for plasticity-led evolution in lizards
Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife. (2020-09-29)

Noninvasive sleep test may help diagnose and predict dementia in older adults
Researchers have discovered and validated a marker of dementia that may help clinicians identify patients who have the condition or are at risk of developing it. (2020-09-28)

3D biometric authentication based on finger veins almost impossible to fool
Biometric authentication, which uses unique anatomical features such as fingerprints or facial features to verify a person's identity, is increasingly replacing traditional passwords for accessing everything from smartphones to law enforcement systems. (2020-09-28)

Stroke alarm clock may streamline and accelerate time-sensitive acute stroke care
An interactive, digital alarm clock may speed emergency stroke care, starting at hospital arrival and through each step of the time-sensitive treatment process. The alarm clock is a low-cost strategy for streamlining stroke care and could translate to fewer deaths and less disability from stroke. (2020-09-24)

Stanford researchers combine CAT scans and advanced computing to fight wildfires
Engineers at Stanford have used X-ray CT scans, more common in hospital labs, to study how wood catches fire. They've now turned that knowledge into a computer simulation to predict where fires will strike and spread. (2020-09-22)

Computational study of famous fossil reveals evolution of locomotion in 'ruling reptiles'
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis-a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago-and inferred that it had a ''mosaic'' of functions in locomotion. (2020-09-21)

Stroke scans could reveal COVID-19 infection
New research from King's College London has found that COVID-19 may be diagnosed on the same emergency scans intended to diagnose stroke. (2020-09-17)

PET/MRI improves lesion detection, reduces radiation exposure
A single-center observational study of more than 1,000 oncological examinations has demonstrated that positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) facilitates cancer staging as well as PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) and improves lesion detectability in select cancers, potentially helping to promote fast, efficient local and whole-body staging in one step. (2020-09-17)

100-million-year-old amber reveals sexual intercourse of ostracods
Dr. WANG He and Prof. WANG Bo, from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS), and their collaborators presented exceptionally well-preserved ostracods with soft parts (appendages and reproductive organs) from mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber (~100 million years old), which revealed sexual intercourse of ostracods. (2020-09-15)

Researchers find cuttlebone's microstructure sits at a 'sweet spot'
Ling Li has a lesson in one of his mechanical engineering courses on how brittle materials like calcium carbonate behave under stress. In it, he takes a piece of chalk composed of the compound and snaps it in half to show his students the edge of one of the broken pieces. The break is blunt and straight. (2020-09-11)

Seeing the eye like never before
In a big step for ophthalmology, scientists created a method to view the inner workings of the eye and its diseases at the cellular level. Currently, researchers can only see a broad section of the retina. This new technology allows them to zoom into just one part of a cell. In their words, they have accelerated the process for vision restoration. (2020-09-10)

Structure of 'immortality protein' now better understood
A key role in studying the telomerase of Hansenula polymorpha was played by KFU's nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. (2020-09-10)

Coming up for air: Extinct sea scorpions could breathe out of water, fossil detective unveils
Through computed tomography (CT) imaging, West Virginia University geologist James Lamsdell led a team that found evidence of air breathing in a 340 million-year-old sea scorpion, or eurypterid. (2020-09-10)

Special journal issue features Nemours heart specialists' best practices for children
The September issue of Progress in Pediatric Cardiology will exclusively feature articles by pediatric cardiologists at Nemours Children's Health System on echocardiography and other cardiac imaging techniques used in the care of children with cardiovascular disease. The 15 original papers and four case studies highlight best practices for imaging to screen, diagnose, and manage congenital heart disease (CHD) and other forms of cardiovascular disease over the entire lifespan to improve patient outcomes. (2020-09-09)

ENT physicians and researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Virtual Annual Meeting
During the AAO-HNSF 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting & OTO Experience, which runs from September 13 through October 25, the most current research in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be introduced during the Scientific Oral Presentations. Scientific Oral Presentations are a series of three- to six-minute presentations focusing on current evidence-based research, surgical procedures, and approaches in clinical sciences and their application to patient care. (2020-09-09)

International registries show PCI rates increased in Japan, US
Japan and the US have seen an increase in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures, which is driven primarily by a rise in elective PCIs in Japan compared to non-elective in the U.S., according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Since adoption of large-scale PCI trial results vary internationally, the study sought to analyze large national registries in both countries to illuminate international variation in PCI practice as a foundation for further quality improvement. (2020-09-07)

New technique to prevent imaging cyberthreats proposed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
As part of his Ph.D. research, Ben-Gurion University researcher Tom Mahler has developed a technique using artificial intelligence that analyzes the instructions sent from the PC to the physical components using a new architecture for the detection of anomalous instructions. (2020-08-25)

Battery life for wearable electronic devices could be improved
Researchers in WMG and the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick have found that asymmetric stresses within electrodes used in certain wearable electronic devices provides an important clue as to how to improve the durability and lifespan of these batteries. (2020-08-25)

New insights into lung tissue in COVID-19 disease
Physicists at the University of Göttingen, together with pathologists and lung specialists at the Medical University of Hannover, have developed a three-dimensional imaging technique that enables high resolution and three-dimensional representation of damaged lung tissue following severe Covid-19. Using a special X-ray microscopy technique, they were able to image changes caused by the coronavirus in the structure of alveoli (the tiny air sacs in the lung) and the vasculature. Results were published in eLife. (2020-08-21)

Children with cognitive delays are more likely to have CT scan to diagnose appendicitis
Computed tomography (CT) is used at a higher rate than ultrasound in children with developmental and cognitive impairments to diagnose appendicitis, even though CT scans increase radiation risk in smaller bodies. (2020-08-21)

Dynamic full-field optical coherence tomography: 3D live-imaging of retinal organoids
Optical coherence tomography offers astounding opportunities to image the complex structure of living tissue but lacks functional information. We present dynamic full-field optical coherence tomography as a technique to noninvasively image living human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived retinal organoids. Coloured images with an endogenous contrast linked to organelle motility are generated, with submicrometre spatial resolution and millisecond temporal resolution, creating a way to identify specific cell types in living tissue via their dynamic profile. (2020-08-18)

Low-dose real-time X-ray imaging with nontoxic double perovskite scintillators
X-ray imaging is widely used in probing the inside information non-destructively. Towards this goal, Scientist in China realized high-resolution X-ray image with the lowest X-ray dose to date, and demonstrated the first real-time X-ray imaging based on nontoxic Cs2Ag0.6Na0.4In0.85Bi0.15Cl6 double perovskite scintillator. This research unfolds huge potentials to explore scintillators beyond lead halide perovskites and lay the foundation for the development of low-dose, high-quality, high-stability X-ray imaging technology. (2020-08-18)

Flexible and protected
In the fight against the coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 researchers from multiple research institutions in Germany have combined their resources to study the spike protein on the surface of the virus. With its spikes, the virus binds to human cells and infects them. The study gave surprising insights into the spike protein, including an unexpected freedom of movement and a protective coat to hide it from antibodies. The results are published in Science. (2020-08-18)

Current lung cancer public health screening guidelines under count African Americans
Public health screening guidelines for lung cancer followed by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) undercount African Americans, contributing to disparities in lung cancer screening and treatment, according to a study published today in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. The JTO is the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2020-08-18)

Method proposed for more accurate determinations of neutron star radii
Neutron stars are the smallest and densest astrophysical objects with visible surfaces in the Universe. They form after gravitational collapses of the iron nuclei of massive (with masses about ten solar masses) stars at the end of their nuclear evolution. We can observe these collapses as supernovae explosions. (2020-08-17)

Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors
A software based on artificial intelligence (AI), which was developed by researchers at the Eye Clinic of the University Hospital Bonn, Stanford University and University of Utah, enables the precise assessment of the progression of geographic atrophy (GA), a disease of the light sensitive retina caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). (2020-08-13)

The larynx has evolved more rapidly in primates
The larynx is larger, more variable in size, and has undergone faster rates of evolution in primates than in carnivores, according to a study published August 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Daniel Bowling of Stanford University, W. Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna, and colleagues. (2020-08-13)

Simpler and faster microscopy system enabling broader biomedical applications
Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has demonstrated great values in biomedical research. However, most OR-PAM systems suffer from limited imaging speed due to their inherent design limitation. A novel, two-dimensional multifocal OR-PAM system using a single-element ultrasonic transducer has been proposed. This system, termed as MFOR-PAMER, enables 400 times shorter scanning time than a conventional OR-PAM system at the same resolution and laser repetition rate. This system is envisaged with promising potential for many biomedical applications. (2020-08-12)

New approach for calculating radiation dosimetry allows for individualized therapy
Researchers have developed a simplified process that could enhance personalization of cancer therapy based on a single nuclear medicine scan. The novel method uses a follow-up single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scan to obtain reliable radiation dose estimates to tumors and at-risk organs. The study is published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-08-11)

Advance in programmable synthetic materials
DNA information is stored in a sequence of chemical building blocks; computers store information as sequences of zeros and ones. Researchers want to transfer this concept to artificial molecules. UC Berkeley and Ruhr-Universität Bochum researchers have taken another step toward encoding information in the sequence of metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), showing how to read the sequence. Multivariate MOFs could encode digital information, but also conduct programmed chemical modifications or controlled drug release. (2020-08-07)

Long neck helped reptile hunt underwater
Its neck was three times as long as its torso, but had only 13 extremely elongated vertebrae: Tanystropheus, a bizarre giraffe-necked reptile which lived 242 million years ago, is a paleontological absurdity. A new study led by the University of Zurich has now shown that the creature lived in water and was surprisingly adaptable. (2020-08-06)

Unveiled: A channel SARS-CoV-2 may use to proceed with viral replication in the host cell
By visualizing coronavirus replication in an infected host cell, researchers may have answered a long-standing question about how newly synthesized coronavirus components are able to be incorporated into fully infectious viruses. (2020-08-06)

Study challenges idea that lower BMI shields smokers from fat-associated health risks
Some smokers might rationalize continuing to smoke because of lower body weight often associated with the habit. However, Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have determined that even with a lower body mass index (BMI), smokers have a higher risk of depositing fat in and around organs and tissues compared to those who never smoked. (2020-07-27)

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