Current Computed Tomography News and Events | Page 3

Current Computed Tomography News and Events, Computed Tomography News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
Look into the mirror
If the eyes are the mirror of the soul, then thanks to the translucent corneas, we can look deep into that soul. And thanks to the work of scientists from the IPC PAS we can look into the depths of the cornea itself. And that without touching it! All thanks to the introduction of an innovative method of holographic optical tomography. (2020-07-24)

Experimental optimal verification of entangled states using local measurements
USTC modified the original proposal to be robust to practical imperfections, and experimentally implement a scalable quantum state verification on two-qubit and four-qubit entangled states with nonadaptive local measurements. The research results were published in Physical Review Letters on July 17th. (2020-07-24)

Smile: Atomic imaging finds root of tooth decay
A collaboration between researchers from Cornell University, Northwestern University and University of Virginia combined complementary imaging techniques to explore the atomic structure of human enamel, exposing tiny chemical flaws in the fundamental building blocks of our teeth. The findings could help scientists prevent or possibly reverse tooth decay. (2020-07-21)

Diagnosing acute aortic syndrome: New guideline for hard-to-diagnose condition
A new guideline aimed at helping clinicians identify the difficult-to-diagnose acute aortic syndrome is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200021. (2020-07-20)

New theranostic agents show efficacy in prostate cancer treatment in preclinical studies
Researchers have developed a new pair of agents that show exceptional effectiveness for precision diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in preclinical studies. The agents, which target prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), can be easily and economically synthesized without specialized equipment. This research was presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2020 Annual Meeting on July 11-14, 2020. (2020-07-13)

In recurrent prostate cancer, PSMA PET/CT changes management in two-thirds of cases
New research confirms the high impact of PSMA PET/CT in the detection and management of recurrent disease in prostate cancer patients. In initial results from a multicenter trial assessing the impact of 18F-DCFPyL prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA PET/CT), a PET-directed change in management was observed in two-thirds of patients. The research was presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting. (2020-07-13)

Whole body scans for trauma patients saves time spent in emergency departments
A new study by a University of South Australia medical imaging student may have found the solution to easing hospital ramping and crowded emergency departments. (2020-07-12)

Targeted radionuclide therapy enhances prostate cancer response to immunotherapies
Targeted radionuclide therapy has been found to create a favorable tumor microenvironment in prostate cancer that improves the effectiveness of immunotherapies. The research, presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2020 Annual Meeting, shows that immunomodulation can be achieved with relatively low radiation dose that does not affect the normal immune system. (2020-07-11)

Total-body PET/CT captures full picture of systemic inflammatory arthritis
For the first time, physicians can examine the systemic burden of inflammatory arthritis simultaneously across all joints and organ systems, using the high-sensitivity, high-resolution uEXPLORER total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (TB-PET/CT) scanner. Results of the first in-human TB-PET/CT scans conducted in the arthritic population were presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting. (2020-07-11)

Age-related features of facial anatomy for increase safety during plastic surgery
Researchers from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine together with colleagues from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, University of Munich and Sechenov University used computed tomography to analyze the individual anatomy of the nasolabial triangle. They identified possible options for the distribution of blood vessels on three-dimensional course. (2020-07-10)

Nano-radiomics unveils treatment effect on tumor microenvironment
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have developed a novel noninvasive approach called nano-radiomics that analyzes imaging data to assess changes in the tumor microenvironment that are not detected with conventional imaging methods. (2020-07-10)

Non-invasive diagnostic procedures for suspected CHD: search reveals informative evidence
Non-invasive diagnostic procedures for suspected CHD: search reveals informative evidence Informative study results are available on diagnostic procedures using computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for suspected coronary heart disease (CHD). (2020-07-08)

Coronary calcium scoring: Personalized preventive care for those most at risk
An imaging test called coronary calcium scoring can help doctors to make the right recommendation about the use of statin therapy. The test is a 10-minute CT (computed tomography) scan looking for calcium deposits in the arteries supplying blood to the heart. Calcium deposits indicate the presence of coronary plaque, also known as atherosclerosis. (2020-07-06)

Cryo-electron tomography reveals uromodulin's role in urinary tract infection protection
Free-flowing filaments of Uromodulin protect against urinary tract infections (UTIs) by duping potentially harmful bacteria to attach to their fishbone-like molecular architecture - rather than to sensitive urinary tract tissues - before being flushed out of the body during urination, researchers report. (2020-07-02)

How the body fights off urinary tract infections
Some people are better protected than others against urinary tract infections. This may be because their bodies produce more of a protein called uromodulin. An interdisciplinary research team has now found out exactly how this helper protein brings relief when nature calls and how this knowledge might benefit the treatment and prevention of these painful inflammations. (2020-07-02)

Moffitt develops tool to detect patients at high risk for poor lung cancer outcomes
In a new study published in Nature Scientific Reports, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have shown how the use of radiomics can improve lung cancer screening by identifying early stage lung cancer patients who may be at high risk for poorer outcomes, and therefore require aggressive follow-up and/or adjuvant therapy. (2020-07-01)

Faster processing makes cutting-edge fluorescence microscopy more accessible
Scientists at NIBIB have developed new image processing techniques for microscopes that can reduce post-processing time up to several thousand-fold. (2020-06-29)

Excessive sugar intake linked with unhealthy fat deposits
Sugar consumption is linked with larger fat deposits around the heart and in the abdomen, which are risky for health. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ''When we consume too much sugar the excess is converted to fat and stored,'' said study author Ms. So Yun Yi, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. (2020-06-28)

Bringing burnt bones back to life using 3D technology
Forensic scientists at the University of Portsmouth have discovered a new way of presenting fragile evidence, by reconstructing a 'jigsaw' of human bone fragments using 3D printing. In the first known study of its kind, researchers took fragmented burnt human bones and tested the ability to make 3D models suitable to be shown to a jury in court. (2020-06-24)

High-tech CT reveals ancient evolutionary adaptation of extinct crocodylomorphs
New insights into the anatomy of the inner ear of prehistoric reptiles, the thalattosuchians, revealed details about the evolutionary adaption during the transition into the ocean after a long semiaquatic phase. These new findings of an international research team were made possible by the use of a Canon high-tech computed tomography (CT) scanner from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW). (2020-06-18)

Oncotarget: Preoperative geriatric nutritional risk index is a useful prognostic indicator
The cover for issue 24 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, 'Cancer-specific survival curves based on GNRI according to pTNM stage,' by Hirahara, et al. Volume 11 Issue 24 of @Oncotarget reported that this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between preoperative Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index and long-term outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. (2020-06-16)

Low physical function increase the risk for bone loss in older hip fracture patients
Low physical function and low muscle mass after hip fracture increased the risk for accelerated bone deterioration in older hip fracture patients. (2020-06-15)

Overactive enzyme causes hereditary hypertension
After more than 40 years, several teams at the MDC and ECRC have now made a breakthrough discovery with the help of two animal models: they have proven that an altered gene encoding the enzyme PDE3A causes an inherited form of high blood pressure. This could lead to new concepts for the treatment of hypertension. (2020-06-11)

A rare heart bone is discovered in chimpanzees
Experts from the University of Nottingham have discovered that some chimpanzees have a bone in their heart, which could be vital in managing their health and conservation. (2020-06-10)

Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day. An international study, co-led by Flinders University's Dr Vera Weisbecker, has revealed the critically endangered parrot's visual system is not as well-adapted to life in the dark as would be expected for a nocturnal bird, raising concerns it might be adversely impacted by fencing in the Australian outback. (2020-06-09)

To think like a dinosaur
Palaeontologists from St Petersburg University have been the first to study in detail the structure of the brain and blood vessels in the skull of the ankylosaur Bissektipelta archibaldi. It was a herbivorous dinosaur somewhat similar in appearance to a modern armadillo. (2020-06-05)

Exercise levels can help doctors predict risk of heart disease and death among elderly
Clinicians can use this information to improve care with early interventions. (2020-06-05)

'Excretion of sugar into stool'? New action of anti-diabetic drug discovered
A research team led by Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine's Professor OGAWA Wataru and Project Associate Professor NOGAMI Munenobu has discovered that metformin, the most widely prescribed anti-diabetic drug, causes sugar to be excreted in the stool. Taking advantage of the new bio-imaging apparatus PET-MRI, they revealed that metformin promotes the excretion of blood sugar from the large intestine into the stool. This is a completely new discovery that was not previously anticipated. (2020-06-03)

Artificial intelligence can improve how chest images are used in care of COVID-19 patients
According to a recent report by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, artificial intelligence (AI) should be used to expand the role of chest X-ray imaging -- using computed tomography, or CT -- in diagnosing and assessing coronavirus infection so that it can be more than just a means of screening for signs of COVID-19 in a patient's lungs. (2020-06-03)

New guidelines for assessment of bone density and microarchitecture in vivo with HR-pQCT
There is an urgent need for guidance and consensus on the methods for, and reporting of, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) imaging so that different studies can be compared to each other. This position paper, published by a joint working group from IOF, ASBMR and ECTS addresses the need for standardization of techniques and terminology, provides guidance on interpretation and reporting of results, and discusses unresolved issues in the field. (2020-06-02)

New technique takes 3D imaging an octave higher
A collaboration between Colorado State University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign resulted in a new, 3D imaging technique to visualize tissues and other biological samples on a microscopic scale, with potential to assist with cancer or other disease diagnoses. Their technique, which allows specimens to generate light at double the frequency, or half the wavelength, of the incident light, is referred to as harmonic optical tomography. (2020-06-02)

Advanced X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease
The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body. Using synchrotron X-rays, researchers at Uppsala University have discovered a drainage system that may be assumed to play a major role in the onset of Ménière's disease, a common and troublesome disorder. These results are published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-05-19)

Molecular imaging offers insight into therapy outcomes for neuroendocrine tumor patients
A new proof-of-concept study published in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine has demonstrated that molecular imaging can be used for identifying early response to 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment in neuroendocrine tumor patients. Monitoring the DNA damage response with molecular imaging in the early days after the radionuclide injection could allow physicians to determine the therapeutic outcome and adapt the therapy regimen accordingly. (2020-05-14)

Unlocking the gate to the millisecond CT
Researchers have developed a new multi-beam method for conducting CT scans that improve image quality whilst drastically cutting the required time to one millisecond. (2020-05-14)

Cutting-edge imaging may provide insight into the functional significance of a stenosis
A novel study aims to evaluate whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) parameters may predict fractional flow reserve (FFR) values and assess if OCT parameters may predict clinical outcome in patients with negative FFR. The study was presented as late-breaking science at the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference. (2020-05-14)

Patients with intermediate left main disease experience worse cardiovascular events
A new study shows that when compared with patients without intermediate left main coronary artery disease, those with intermediate left main disease have greater risk of cardiovascular events. The findings of the ISCHEMIA trial sub study were presented during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference as featured clinical research. (2020-05-14)

New imaging tool helps researchers see extent of Alzheimer's early damage
New imaging technology allows scientists to see the widespread loss of brain synapses in early stages of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that one day may help aid in drug development, according to a new Yale University study. (2020-05-13)

Scientists reveal solar system's oldest molecular fluids could hold the key to early life
Scientists from the Royal Ontario Museum have analysed a meteorite atom by atom to reveal the chemistry and acidity of the earliest fluids in the solar system. By finding evidence of sodium-rich alkaline water in the Tagish Lake meteorite, this new study suggests amino acids could have formed rapidly on the parent asteroid, opening the door for the early evolution of microbial life. (2020-05-11)

International research improves quality of CT scan imagery
Computerized tomography (CT) is one of the most effective medical tests for analysing the effects of many illnesses, including COVID-19. An international team has developed a new method that improves the quality of the images obtained from CT scans. The algorithm, tested on simulated data, enables them to distinguish different body's tissue types better and opens the door to lowering the doses of radiation to which patients are exposed during this type of test. (2020-05-08)

Novel radiotracer meets gold standard for imaging prostate cancer
The novel radiopharmaceutical 18F-PSMA-1007 is both effective and readily available for detecting malignant prostate cancer lesions, according to research published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. With this new option and 68Ga-PSMA-11, which is already widely used, nuclear medicine departments will have two effective options for staging of prostate cancer, potentially increasing availability for patients worldwide. (2020-05-08)

Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.