Current Computer Engineering News and Events

Current Computer Engineering News and Events, Computer Engineering News Articles.
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Researchers create 'beautiful marriage' of quantum enemies
Cornell University scientists have identified a new contender when it comes to quantum materials for computing and low-temperature electronics. (2021-02-22)

Blueprint for fault-tolerant qubits
Building a quantum computer is a challenging task because of the fragility of quantum bits. To deal with this problem, various types of active error correction techniques have been developed. In contrast, researchers from J├╝lich and Aachen together with partners from Basel and Delft have now proposed a design for an inherently fault protected circuit with passive error correction that could significantly accelerate the construction of a quantum computer with a large number of qubits. (2021-02-18)

In response to Stephen Colbert, FAU professor says 'spice it up'
A research professor gives a ''shout out'' to comedian Stephen Colbert. His motivation? Colbert previously referred to mathematical equations as the devil's sentences and an unnatural commingling of letters and numbers - the worst being the quadratic equation - an infernal salad of numbers, letters and symbols. In response, the professor suggests that mathematics education needs to be enlivened so that students will recognize that this discipline is not merely a necessary evil, but a vibrant, exciting and fascinating subject. (2021-02-17)

Modeling a better catalyst for PIBSAs
Polyisobutenyl succinic anhydrides (PIBSAs) are important for the auto industry because of their wide use in lubricant and fuel formulations. New research led by the Computer-Aided Nano and Energy Lab (CANELa) at the University of Pittsburgh, in collaboration with the Lubrizol Corporation, builds a deeper understanding of the catalyst used to synthesize PIBSAs. (2021-02-17)

3D microscopy clarifies understanding of body's immune response to obesity
Researchers who focus on fat know that some adipose tissue is more prone to inflammation-related comorbidities than others, but the reasons why are not well understood. Thanks to a new analytical technique, scientists are getting a clearer view of the microenvironments found within adipose tissue associated with obesity. This advance may illuminate why some adipose tissues are more prone to inflammation - leading to diseases like type 2 diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disorders - and help direct future drug therapies to treat obesity. (2021-02-17)

Skoltech's recent achievement takes us one step closer to Mars
Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that enables processing images from autonomous greenhouses, monitoring plant growth, and automating the cultivation process. In their article, they share the experience in the scope of controlled-environment agriculture automation in the Antarctic station greenhouse facility called EDEN ISS. (2021-02-17)

New tool predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation
A mathematical model predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation. The results of the study by a research team from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona-Spain) and the Institute of Health Research Pere Virgili show a potential reduction of the current rate of reintubation from 9% to 1% by using machine learning tools. Data from a thousand intensive-care patients with respiratory difficulties has been processed and analysed to create this tool (2021-02-15)

UMass Amherst team helps demonstrate spontaneous quantum error correction
Published by the journal Nature, research co-authored by University of Massachusetts Amherst physicist Chen Wang, graduate students Jeffrey Gertler and Shruti Shirol, and postdoctoral researcher Juliang Li takes a step toward building a fault-tolerant quantum computer. They have realized a novel type of QEC where the quantum errors are spontaneously corrected. (2021-02-11)

Solar awnings over parking lots help companies and customers
Michigan Tech engineers look into the untapped potential of parking lots in a study that investigates the energy-related benefits of developing charging stations powered with solar canopies built into the parking infrastructure of large-scale retailers like Walmart. (2021-02-10)

Samara Polytech chemists simplify crystal structures
Samara Polytech scientists have developed new methods of modelling the crystal structure of chemical substances, which makes it possible to obtain additional information about the object under study, unknown in the initial experimental data, and also to find regularities determining its structure and properties. (2021-02-09)

Geisinger researchers find AI can predict death risk
Researchers at Geisinger have found that a computer algorithm developed using echocardiogram videos of the heart can predict mortality within a year. The algorithm--an example of what is known as machine learning, or artificial intelligence (AI)--outperformed other clinically used predictors, including pooled cohort equations and the Seattle Heart Failure score. (2021-02-08)

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time
Systems designed to detect deepfakes --videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence--can be deceived, computer scientists showed for the first time at the WACV 2021 conference which took place online Jan. 5 to 9, 2021. Researchers showed detectors can be defeated by inserting inputs called adversarial examples into every video frame. The adversarial examples are slightly manipulated inputs which cause artificial intelligence systems such as machine learning models to make a mistake. (2021-02-08)

New AI tool can thwart coronavirus mutations
USC computer scientists used AI to create a new tool that rapidly identifies potential solutions to coronavirus mutations and screens vaccines much faster to give humans an advantage over the contagion. (2021-02-05)

Computer can determine whether you'll die from COVID
Using patient data, artificial intelligence can make a 90 percent accurate assessment of whether a person will die from COVID-19 or not, according to new research at the University of Copenhagen. Body mass index (BMI), gender and high blood pressure are among the most heavily weighted factors. The research can be used to predict the number of patients in hospitals, who will need a respirator and determine who ought to be first in line for a vaccination. (2021-02-05)

The Ramanujan Machine
The study, which was published in the journal Nature, was carried out by undergraduates from different faculties under the tutelage of Assistant Professor Ido Kaminer of the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion. (2021-02-05)

'Audeo' teaches artificial intelligence to play the piano
A University of Washington team created Audeo, a system that can generate music using only visual cues of someone playing the piano. (2021-02-04)

Retrained generic antibodies can recognize SARS-CoV-2
An alternative approach to train the immunity response is offered by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago and California State University at Sacramento who have developed a novel strategy that redirects antibodies for other diseases existing in humans to the spike proteins of SARS-CoV-2. (2021-02-03)

Researchers design next-generation photodetector
The new long-wavelength infrared photodetector from Professor Manijeh Razeghi could be used in night vision, optical communication, and thermal and medical imaging. (2021-02-02)

New realm of personalized medicine with brain stimulation
Millions of patients suffering from neurological and mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and chronic pain are treatment-resistant. New research paves the way for a promising alternative: personalized deep brain stimulation. Researchers have found a way to predict what effect electrical stimulation will have on an individual's brain activity across multiple brain regions. The work represents a major step forward in achieving new therapies for a whole host of neurological and mental disorders. (2021-02-01)

Threads that sense how and when you move? New technology makes it possible
Engineers have developed a thread-based sensor capable of monitoring the direction, angle of rotation and degree of displacement of the head. The design is a proof of principle that could be extended to measuring movements of other limbs by sensors attached like tatoos to the skin. (2021-01-29)

How the brain is programmed for computer programming?
Expert computer programmers show higher proficiency in certain behavioural and attention skills than their novice peers. To identify the responsible brain regions, scientists used fMRI to analyse the brain activities of 30 programmers of different skill level, finding that seven regions of the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices in expert programmers' brains are fine-tuned for programming. The findings could provide better methods and tools for everyone to learn programming. (2021-01-28)

Breakthrough design at UBCO vastly improves mechanical heart valve
New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus may take the current 'gold standard' for heart valves to a new level of reliability. A team of researchers at UBCO's Heart Valve Performance Lab (HVPL) has developed a way to improve overall blood flow through the valves, so the design of mechanical heart valves will more closely match the real thing. (2021-01-26)

Smart algorithm cleans up images by searching for clues buried in noise
In a new study published in Nature Machine Intelligence, researchers at Texas A&M University have unveiled a machine learning-based algorithm that can reduce graininess in low-resolution images and reveal new details that were otherwise buried within the noise. (2021-01-26)

New metamaterial offers reprogrammable properties
EPFL scientists have developed a metamaterial whose mechanical properties can be reprogrammed on demand and whose internal structure can be modified by applying a magnetic field. (2021-01-20)

Merging technologies with color to avoid design failures
Various software packages can be used to evaluate products and predict failure; however, these packages are extremely computationally intensive and take a significant amount of time to produce a solution. Quicker solutions mean less accurate results. (2021-01-20)

Cyber-evolution: How computer science is harnessing the power of Darwinian transformation
A new study highlights the progress our machines have made in replicating evolutionary processes and what this could mean for engineering design, software refinement, gaming strategy, robotics and even medicine, while fostering a deeper insight into foundational issues in biological evolution. (2021-01-18)

Broadening horizons for people with quadriplegia
An assistive technology uses magnetic skin to support freedom of movement for people with quadriplegia. (2021-01-17)

Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers
Scientists at the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu have found a way to develop optical quantum computers of a new type. Central to the discovery are rare earth ions that have certain characteristics and can act as quantum bits. These would give quantum computers ultrafast computation speed and better reliability compared to earlier solutions. The University of Tartu researchers Vladimir Hizhnyakov, Vadim Boltrushko, Helle Kaasik and Yurii Orlovskii published the results of their research in the scientific journal Optics Communications. (2021-01-15)

New videos show RNA as it's never been seen
Using data from RNA-folding experiments, the researchers generated the first-ever data-driven movies of how RNA folds as it is made by cellular machinery. By watching their videos of this folding occur, the researchers discovered that RNA often folds in surprising, perhaps unintuitive ways, such as tying itself into knots. (2021-01-15)

Study finds neglected mutations may play important role in autism spectrum disorder
Mutations that occur in certain DNA regions, called tandem repeats, may play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders, according to research led by Melissa Gymrek, assistant professor in the UC San Diego Department of Computer Science and Engineering and School of Medicine. The study, which was published in Nature on Jan. 14, was co-authored by UCLA professor of human genetics Kirk Lohmueller and highlights the contributions these understudied mutations can make to disease. (2021-01-13)

Team creates hybrid chips with processors and memory to run AI on battery-powered devices
Transactions between processors and memory can consume 95 percent of the energy needed to do machine learning and AI, which severely limits battery life. A team led by Stanford engineers has designed a system that can run AI tasks faster, and with less energy, by harnessing eight hybrid chips, each with its own data processor built right next to its own memory storage. (2021-01-11)

Robot displays a glimmer of empathy to a partner robot
Like a longtime couple who can predict each other's every move, a Columbia Engineering robot has learned to predict its partner robot's future actions and goals based on just a few initial video frames. The study, conducted at Columbia Engineering's Creative Machines Lab led by Mechanical Engineering Professor Hod Lipson, is part of a broader effort to endow robots with the ability to understand and anticipate the goals of other robots, purely from visual observations. (2021-01-11)

Machine learning accelerates discovery of materials for use in industrial processes
Research led by scientists at the University of Toronto and Northwestern University employs machine learning to craft the best building blocks in the assembly of reticular framework materials for use in a targeted application. The findings demonstrate that the use of artificial intelligence approaches can help in proposing novel materials for diverse applications such as clean energy, sensoring and biomedicine, by accelerating the design cycle for materials. (2021-01-11)

Detecting COVID-19 antibodies in 10-12 seconds
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University report findings on an advanced nanomaterial-based biosensing platform that detects, within seconds, antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to testing, the platform will help to quantify patient immunological response to the new vaccines with precision. (2021-01-08)

Accelerating AI computing to the speed of light
A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material. (2021-01-08)

DUAL takes AI to the next level
Scientists at DGIST in Korea, and UC Irvine and UC San Diego in the US, have developed a computer architecture that processes unsupervised machine learning algorithms faster, while consuming significantly less energy than state-of-the-art graphics processing units. The key is processing data where it is stored in computer memory and in an all-digital format. The researchers presented the new architecture, called DUAL, at the 2020 53rd Annual IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Microarchitecture. (2020-12-30)

The first endovascular technology that can explore capillaries
EPFL scientists have invented a technique to navigate electronic devices that are smaller than human hair inside blood vessels and reach arterioles. The next step will be conducting in vivo tests. (2020-12-22)

Japanese art technique inspires new engineering technique
A team of Northwestern University engineers is using ideas taken from paper-folding practices to create a sophisticated alternative to 3D printing. (2020-12-22)

A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4D image data
A joint research team co-led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualise three-dimensional (3D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analysing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionising the way biologists analyse image data, this tool can advance further studies in developmental and cell biology, such as the growth of cancer cells. (2020-12-22)

High-five or thumbs-up? New device detects which hand gesture you want to make
A new device developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can recognize hand gestures based on electrical signals detected in the forearm. The system, which couples wearable biosensors with artificial intelligence (AI), could one day be used to control prosthetics or to interact with almost any type of electronic device. (2020-12-21)

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