Current Concrete News and Events

Current Concrete News and Events, Concrete News Articles.
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Controlling deflection in construction beams
In civil engineering, flexural beams are used to control the effect of vibrations that can cause cracks to appear in surfaces (concrete slabs) and beams. This is particularly important in buildings that require high tensile strength and where the use of machinery can cause a lot of vibrations that can disturb structural integrity. (2021-02-22)

Self-healing concrete for regions with high moisture and seismic activity
Preparing regular concrete scientists replaced ordinary water with water concentrate of bacteria Bacillus cohnii, which survived in the pores of cement stone. The cured concrete was tested for compression until it cracked, then researchers observed how the bacteria fixed the gaps restoring the strength of the concrete. The engineers of the Polytechnic Institute of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), together with colleagues from Russia, India and Saudi Arabia, reported the results in Sustainability journal. (2021-02-17)

Researchers study how lifelong environmentalists want their remains handled after death
A new study from the University of Kansas in the journal Mortality details how older environmentalists consider death care and how likely they are to choose ''green'' burials and other eco-friendly options. (2021-02-09)

Recycling face masks into roads to tackle COVID-generated waste
Researchers have developed a new road-making material that mixes shredded single-use face masks with processed building rubble. Their analysis shows making just 1km of a 2-lane road with the material would enable 3 million face masks to be recycled and kept out of landfill. (2021-02-02)

They're just not that into you: Consumer-brand relationship insights
To reap benefits from a variety of brand relationships, marketers should match their marketing communications to how close or distant consumers feel toward their brands. (2021-01-28)

Is there a link between cashless payments and unhealthy consumption?
The widespread use of cashless payments including credit cards, debit cards, and mobile apps has made transactions more convenient for consumers. However, results from previous research have shown that such cashless payments can increase consumers' spending on unhealthy food. (2021-01-27)

How complex oscillations in a quantum system simplify with time
With a clever experiment, physicists have shown that in a one-dimensional quantum system, the initially complex distribution of vibrations or phonons can change over time into a simple Gaussian bell curve. The experiment took place at the Vienna University of Technology, while the theoretical considerations were carried out by a joint research group from the Freie Universität Berlin and HZB. (2021-01-25)

Direct current stimulation of the brain over Wernicke's area can help people learn new words
Researchers from the Laboratory of Behavioural Neurodynamics at St Petersburg University have studied how different types of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the brain affect the acquisition of new words. Their experiments have shown that cathodal tDCS over Wernicke's area enables subjects to better remember new abstract words - those that refer to non-physical entities and ideas. (2021-01-20)

Bio-inspired: How lobsters can help make stronger 3D printed concrete
New research addresses some of the technical issues that still need to be solved for 3D printed concrete to be strong enough for use in more free-form structures. Researchers found lobster-inspired printing patterns can make 3DCP stronger and help direct the strength where it's needed. And combining the patterns with a concrete mix enhanced with steel fibres can deliver a material that's stronger than traditionally-made concrete. (2021-01-19)

Do as the Romans: Power plant concrete strengthens with time
Nagoya University scientists find a rare mineral in nuclear power plant walls, significantly improving their strength following years of full operation. (2021-01-13)

Flashing plastic ash completes recycling
Rice University's flash graphene process, adapted to convert worthless pyrolyzed plastic ash, could be used to strengthen concrete and toughen plastics used in medicine, energy and packaging applications. (2021-01-13)

Preserving workers' hearing health by improving earplug efficiency
How could we improve the comfort and effectiveness of these earplugs? What aspects of the ear canal must be taken into account? To answer these questions, researchers from the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS University) and the Institut de recherche en santé et sécurité du travail (IRSST) analyzed the varying structure of ear canals to find a correlation between their shapes and the effectiveness of three commonly-used models of earplugs. (2021-01-08)

Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home
The UPV/EHU's IXA group has use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represent the activation of both sensors and human activity. (2020-11-30)

Seismic guidelines underestimate impact of 'The Big One' on metro Vancouver buildings
Scientists examining the effects of a megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest say tall buildings across Metro Vancouver will experience greater shaking than currently accounted for by Canada's national seismic hazard model. (2020-11-30)

Recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfi
Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete. Researchers at UBC Okanagan's School of Engineering conducted side-by-side comparisons of recycled and conventional concrete within two common applications--a building foundation and a municipal sidewalk. They found that the recycled concrete had comparable strength and durability after five years of being in service. (2020-11-30)

Why experiences are better gifts for older children
What should we get for our kids this holiday? As children get older, giving them something they can experience (live through) instead of material things makes them happier, according to new research led by Lan Nguyen Chaplin, associate professor of marketing at the University of Illinois Chicago. (2020-11-24)

Analyzing biological and chemical damage on 20th-century construction materials
The UPV/EHU's IBeA research group has accurately determined the deterioration undergone by synthetic construction materials and its origin. Portable, high-resolution spectroscopic techniques were used to analyze the impact of the environment and surrounding biological conditions. The results obtained show that lichens play an active role in this deterioration, and a new method has been developed based on them to measure the degree of environmental contamination. (2020-11-02)

How computer scientists and marketers can create a better CX with AI
A failure to incorporate behavioral insight into technological developments may undermine consumers' experiences with AI. (2020-10-28)

Tracing the source of illicit sand--can it be done?
If you've visited the beach recently, you might think sand is ubiquitous. But in construction uses, the perfect sand and gravel is not always an easy resource to come by. ''Not all sand is equal in terms of what it can be used for,'' notes Zack Sickman, coauthor of a new study to be presented on Thursday at the Geological Society of America annual meeting. (2020-10-28)

Concrete structure's lifespan extended by a carbon textile
The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT) has announced the development of an effective structural strengthening method using a noncombustible carbon textile grid and cement mortar, which can double the load-bearing capacities of structurally deficient concrete structures and increase their usable lifespan by threefold. (2020-10-26)

Trees prefer the big city life
A new study examines how trees respond to different urban intensities by comparing tree size and age, foliage nitrogen signature, nutrient and heavy metal content and other factors in forests in Newark, Del., and Philadelphia, Pa. Not only were the trees acclimated to urban conditions in the higher density Philadelphia forests, but the red maples there were actually healthier and more productive compared to those surrounded by less urbanization in Newark. (2020-10-16)

Mental accounting is impacting sustainable behavior
Human beings tend to create separate mental budget compartments where specific acts of consumption and payments are linked. This mechanism can be counter-productive when it comes to energy consumption and can have a negative impact on attempts to reduce carbon emissions. Psychologists from the University of Geneva, have linked theories and research on mental accounting to energy and sustainability behaviour, proposing concrete strategies to improve the impact of climate-control measures. (2020-10-13)

Cement-free concrete beats corrosion and gives fatbergs the flush
Researchers from RMIT University have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion. (2020-09-28)

Words matter: Revealing 'how' restaurateurs land investors online
Online crowdfunding is a multibillion dollar industry, but crafting a compelling pitch that stands out among thousands of projects and lands investors is challenging, especially in the restaurant industry. Researchers at the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management have identified linguistic styles that could tip the scales for restaurateurs seeking financial backing online. (2020-09-01)

Growing demand for zero-deforestation cacao might not help Colombian forests
Cacao in Colombia is not a major driver of deforestation - yet. But increased demand could imperil forests in the future. New research shows cacao stakeholders have to overcome barriers to reach markets that value zero-deforestation, complicating one of Colombia's post-conflict strategies. (2020-08-27)

3D printing 'greener' buildings using local soil
The construction industry is currently facing two major challenges: the demand for sustainable infrastructure and the need to repair deteriorating buildings, bridges and roads. Concrete has a large carbon footprint, resulting in high waste and energy expenditure. Today, scientists report progress toward a sustainable building material made from local soil, using a 3D printer. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-20)

How to mix old tires and building rubble to make sustainable roads
A recycled blend developed by Australian researchers brings together construction and tyre waste, to deliver both environmental and engineering benefits. The material offers a zero-waste solution to a massive environmental challenge - construction, renovation and demolition account for about 50% of the waste produced annually worldwide, while around 1 billion scrap tyres are generated globally each year. (2020-07-29)

Recent advances in 2D, 3D and higher-order topological photonics
A research team from South Korea and the USA has provided a comprehensive review covering the recent progress in topological photonics, a recently emerging branch of photonics. This review introduces the basics of topological band theory and various two-dimensional topological phases, followed by three-dimensional topological phases and approaches to achieve them. Recently emerging fields including topological degeneracies in nonzero dimensions, Maxwellian spin waves, higher-order photonic topological phases, and layer pseudospin are also discussed. (2020-07-27)

Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure
Concrete sewer pipes around the world are most likely to fail either because their concrete is not strong enough or because they can't handle the weight of trucks that drive over them, a new study indicates. (2020-07-27)

Ancient viral DNA suggests smallpox widespread in Viking Age Northern Europe
Viral DNA isolated from ancient human remains reveals the presence of smallpox in 7th century northern Europe, increasing the definitive antiquity of the disease in humans by nearly 1,000 years, according to a new study. (2020-07-23)

Particulate plutonium released from the Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns
Small amounts of plutonium (Pu) were released from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) reactors into the environment during the site's 2011 nuclear disaster. However, the physical, chemical, and isotopic form of the released Pu has remained unknown. Now, recent work published in the journal ''Science of the Total Environment'' has shown that Pu was included inside cesium-rich microparticles (CsMPs) that were emitted from the site. (2020-07-14)

Harmful microbes found on sewer pipe walls
Can antibiotic-resistant bacteria escape from sewers into waterways and cause a disease outbreak? A new Rutgers study, published in the journal Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, examined the microbe-laden ''biofilms'' that cling to sewer walls, and even built a simulated sewer to study the germs that survive within. (2020-07-06)

Scientists use a Teflon pipe to make a cheap, simple reactor for silica particle synthesis
The synthesis of silica particles, used in bioimaging and drug delivery, could become considerably cheaper and more efficient by adopting a new flow synthesis method demonstrated by researchers in Australia and China, which involves a spiral channel and simple Teflon pipe to promote the rapid mixing of precursor fluids. (2020-07-01)

How the giant sequoia protects itself
A three-dimensional network of fibers makes the bark resistant to fire and rock fall. (2020-06-17)

Stiffer roadways could improve truck fuel efficiency
A theoretical study by MIT researchers suggests that small changes in roadway paving practices could reduce that efficiency loss, potentially eliminating a half-percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, at little to no cost. (2020-06-11)

New research leads to lighter and greener bridges
A recently completed research project revealed the potential for reducing material used for a suspension bridge deck by more than 25 per cent -- meaning a saving of up to 30 per cent of CO2 emissions. (2020-06-03)

A bio-inspired addition to concrete stops the damage caused by freezing and thawing
Concrete is one of the most durable building materials used in modern-day infrastructures, but it has a weakness -- ice -- which can cause it to crumble. Now, inspired by organisms that survive in sub-zero environments, researchers in Colorado are introducing polymer molecules with anti-freezing abilities into concrete. The method, which tests if the new concrete can stop the damage caused by freezing and thawing, appears in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science on May 27, 2020. (2020-05-27)

'Nature's antifreeze' provides formula for more durable concrete
Secrets to cementing the sustainability of our future infrastructure may come from nature, such as proteins that keep plants and animals from freezing in extremely cold conditions. CU Boulder researchers have discovered that a synthetic molecule based on natural antifreeze proteins minimizes freeze-thaw damage and increases the strength and durability of concrete, improving the longevity of new infrastructure and decreasing carbon emissions over its lifetime. (2020-05-27)

Bricks made from plastic, organic waste
Revolutionary 'green' types of bricks and construction materials could be made from recycled PVC, waste plant fibres or sand with the help of a remarkable new kind of rubber polymer discovered by Australian scientists. The rubber polymer, itself made from sulfur and canola oil, can be compressed and heated with fillers to create construction materials of the future, say researchers in the Young Chemist issue of Chemistry - A European Journal. (2020-05-26)

Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg studied the construction of an eight km stretch of road and calculated how emissions could be reduced now and by 2045, looking at everything from materials choice, production technology, supply chains and transport. (2020-05-18)

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