Current Confidence News and Events

Current Confidence News and Events, Confidence News Articles.
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Friends fur life help build skills for life
A new UBC Okanagan study finds children not only reap the benefits of working with therapy dogs-they enjoy it too. (2021-02-17)

The quick choice might be a choice-overload avoidance strategy
Making a choice quickly might appear effortless, but University at Buffalo research that measured cardiovascular responses in the moment of making a choice, rather than after-the-fact, suggests that the apparent swift certainty might instead be a defense from having to think too deeply about the choices being presented to them. (2021-02-03)

Sport participation levels lower in students from lower socio-economic groups
Students from lower socio-economic groups (SEG) are less likely to participate in sport or physical activity at university, research from Sheffield Hallam University has found. (2021-02-01)

Many junior doctors feel out of their depth with the end-of-life decisions faced during COVID-19 pandemic
In normal times, end-of-life care discussions are most commonly led by senior doctors. However, new research from a busy London hospital shows that the high numbers of deaths taking place in hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic, frequently out-of-hours, is leading to junior (foundation level) doctors having to lead on these difficult discussions with families, often with no formal experience or training. (2021-01-20)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Simple, cheap test can help save lives from colorectal cancer
New research has demonstrated that a simple, cheap test can help identify who is at risk of developing colorectal cancer, aiding early diagnosis and potentially saving lives. (2021-01-18)

Research finds increased trust in government and science amid pandemic
New Curtin University research has found a dramatic increase in people's trust in government in Australia and New Zealand as a result of the COVID pandemic. (2021-01-08)

Study: Religion, psychology share methods for reducing distress
Religious people facing life crises rely on emotion-regulation strategies that psychologists also use, a new study finds. They look for positive ways of thinking about hardship, a practice known to psychologists as ''cognitive reappraisal.'' They also tend to have confidence in their ability to cope with difficulty, a trait called ''coping self-efficacy.'' Both have been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. (2021-01-08)

Two thirds of people with lupus would take COVID-19 vaccine, shows LRA survey
Two out of three people with lupus (64%) are willing to take a COVID-19 vaccine if it is free and determined safe by scientists according to results of a survey conducted by the Lupus Research Alliance (LRA). (2020-12-16)

Exercise for low back pain beneficial but no one agrees on why
A new UNSW evidence review has found there is still no consensus between researchers about why exercise works for low back pain patients - despite decades of studies on the topic. (2020-12-16)

New computational method validates images without 'ground truth'
Researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering have developed a computational method that allows them to determine not if an entire imaging picture is accurate, but if any given point on the image is probable, based on the assumptions built into the model. (2020-12-11)

Program reduces social isolation among middle-aged and older adults
An existing service in the North West of England called Community Connectors, which enables adults to access social activities within their community, can help reduce loneliness and social isolation, according to an analysis published in Health & Social Care in the Community. (2020-12-09)

Study highlights strategies for boosting accuracy of personal genetic risk scores
As the consumer genetics industry rapidly expands, more and more people are turning to DNA-based services to learn their risk of developing a wide range of diseases. However, the risk scores from these genetic tests are not always as precise as they could be, according to a new study from Scripps Research. The scientists examine many approaches to calculating the scores and recommend that personal genomics organizations adopt standards that will raise the bar for accuracy. (2020-12-03)

Why does it matter if most Republican voters still think Biden lost?
As President-elect Joe Biden and his administrative team officially begin the transition process, only about 20 percent of Republican voters consider him the true winner of the election. Nearly half of all respondents--48 percent--still expect President Donald Trump to be inaugurated for a second term on January 20, despite plenty of indicators to the contrary. Those are among the findings of the latest Bright Line Watch (November) survey--conducted by political science faculty at the University of Rochester, Chicago, and Dartmouth. (2020-12-02)

Dogmatic people seek less information even when uncertain
People who are dogmatic about their views seek less information and make less accurate judgements as a result, even on simple matters unrelated to politics, according to a study led by UCL and Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics researchers. (2020-11-20)

Study of hope and optimism: New paper examines research in emerging fields
A new paper published by the John Templeton Foundation explores the latest scientific and philosophical research on the related but distinct virtues of hope and optimism. The 45-page white paper, written by Michael Milona, a philosophy professor at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, examines findings on the benefits and risks involved in both hope and optimism. It examines projects by more than 29 researchers worldwide on topics related to the effects of hope and optimism in education, faith, healthcare, politics, and more. (2020-11-19)

A neural network learns when it should not be trusted
MIT researchers have developed a way for deep learning neural networks to rapidly estimate confidence levels in their output. The advance could enhance safety and efficiency in AI-assisted decision making, with applications ranging from medical diagnosis to autonomous driving. (2020-11-19)

UCF researcher examines benefits of supportive communities for older adults
To find out just how well the aging-in-community strategy is working, a University of Central Florida health management and informatics researcher examined three aging-in-community programs in Florida. Her study, which is among the first to examine some key variables for these programs, was recently published in the journal Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine. (2020-11-17)

Comprehensive safety testing of COVID-19 vaccines based on experience with prior vaccines
'The urgent need for COVID-19 vaccines must be balanced with the imperative of ensuring safety and public confidence in vaccines by following the established clinical safety testing protocols throughout vaccine development, including both pre- and post-deployment,' write David M. Knipe and colleagues in this Perspective. (2020-11-17)

Just hours of training triples doctor confidence in use of handheld ultrasound devices
Filling a training gap, a Penn Medicine doctor created a geriatric medicine-centered course for point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) devices that doubled doctor confidence. (2020-11-17)

US nephrology fellows' perceptions on home dialysis training
This study assessed nephrology fellows' confidence and clinical experience with these therapies near the completion of their training. Researchers surveyed trainee attendees of 3 separate home dialysis-focused conferences. Overall, perceived preparedness was moderate for peritoneal dialysis and low for home hemodialysis. The majority reported participation in a continuity clinic and other home dialysis education, but nearly all desired more focused teaching on PD and HHD. This study suggests that redesign of nephrology fellowship training in home dialysis is warranted. (2020-11-16)

Continuity determines whether physical activity on prescription works for the least active
Ongoing support for several years and focus on the individual. These are success factors that make physical activity on prescription a workable concept for patients, including those who, after six months, have not reached their desired physical activity level, a University of Gothenburg thesis shows. (2020-11-12)

Divide and conquer: a new formula to minimize 'mathemaphobia'
Maths - it's the subject some kids love to hate, yet despite its lack of popularity, mathematics is critical for a STEM-capable workforce and vital for Australia's current and future productivity. New research finds that boosting student confidence in maths, is pivotal to greater engagement with the subject. (2020-10-26)

Coronavirus vaccines stir doubts among many people worldwide, new study shows
New Nature Medicine study highlights potential global hesitancy to accept a COVID-19 vaccine. Based on data collected with the previously validated COVID-SCORE survey of a sample of over 13,400 individuals from 19 countries that have been hard-hit by the virus, the investigators found that 72 % of participants would likely take the vaccine. Of the remaining 28 %, 14% would refuse, while 14% would hesitate, which translates into tens of millions of potential vaccine avoiders. (2020-10-20)

Higher hypothetical disease risk linked with greater willingness to vaccinate
A survey of US adults showed that as local case counts of a hypothetical disease increased -- indicating increased risk of infection -- the proportion of people willing to receive a vaccine for the disease also increased. Bert Baumgaertner of the University of Idaho, Moscow, United States and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. (2020-10-15)

Nerve cell activity shows how confident we are
Should I or shouldn't I? The activity of individual nerve cells in the brain tells us how confident we are in our decisions. This is shown by a recent study by researchers at the University of Bonn. The result is unexpected - the researchers were actually on the trail of a completely different evaluation mechanism. The results are published in the journal Current Biology. (2020-10-09)

Trust and income inequality fueling the spread of COVID-19
Trust in public institutions is linked to fewer COVID-19 deaths, but trust and belonging to groups is associated with more deaths, according to a wide-ranging, McGill-led study of 30-day COVID-19 mortality rates in 84 countries. Greater economic inequality is also associated with COVID-19 mortality. (2020-10-07)

DECT in the ED: better diagnoses, less follow-up, more savings
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), dual-energy CT (DECT) added value to routine interpretation of emergency department (ED) imaging studies by increasing radiologists' diagnostic confidence, leading to a reduction in downstream imaging and associated costs. (2020-10-02)

Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid ''catastrophizing'' worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University. (2020-09-29)

The Lancet: Largest global vaccine confidence survey reveals hesitancy hotspots
Public confidence in vaccines varies widely between countries and regions around the world, with signs that public trust may be improving in parts of Europe, whilst several countries experiencing political instability and religious extremism are seeing growing scepticism that vaccines are safe, and the spread of misinformation online is threatening vaccination programmes worldwide. (2020-09-10)

Unravelling the potential of the unconscious mind
By using a combination of artificial intelligence and brain imaging technology, researchers have discovered that humans can be trained to rationally use the unconscious contents of their mental processes. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, could open the way to important new approaches in neuroscience and artificial intelligence, but also lead to novel applications in clinical, educational or social settings. (2020-08-27)

Survey finds election concerns vary by race, education levels, party affiliation
The coronavirus pandemic is creating concerns about the safety of the 2020 elections, with some people also questioning the integrity of the safety precautions being taken. A new survey finds that while most voters believe that voting will be safe and that their ballot will be counted despite the pandemic, those who question election safety and some who question election integrity appear less likely to vote. (2020-08-27)

New research contradicts claims that Asian American students are harmed when they cannot attend their first-choice university
A new study finds evidence that contradicts claims in legal complaints to the U.S. Department of Justice arguing that Asian American students face negative consequences while in college as a result of not being admitted to and not attending their first-choice institution. These complaints led to the Trump administration launching formal investigations into the race-conscious admissions practices of Harvard and Yale universities. The findings were published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-08-24)

New study: Hydroxychloroquine ineffective as a preventive antiviral against COVID-19
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have added to the growing body of understanding about how hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is not a possible defense against COVID-19. Specifically, they found that HCQ is not effective in preventing COVID-19 in patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting a broader interpretation of HCQ as ineffective preventive medicine for the general population. Their findings were recently published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. (2020-08-17)

Project Raphael brings improved health to disadvantaged populations
Project Raphael, a novel social incubator for improving health in disadvantaged regions, was developed by Bar-Ilan University to create academic-community partnerships that define and address the most pressing health needs in northern Israel. Raphael offers local community and health organizations an opportunity to define the most pressing problems in their communities, and develop creative solutions. Thirteen organizations whose proposals were implemented were closely tracked over time and tangible improvements in health for disadvantaged populations resulted. (2020-08-11)

Challenges in diagnosing hypersensitivity pneumonitis addressed in latest guidelines
More than 30 years after the last guidance on the clinical evaluation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), the American Thoracic Society - in collaboration with the Asociación Latinoamericana de Tórax or ALAT and the Japanese Respiratory Society- has developed new guidelines for clinicians. The guidelines are available online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-08-03)

Helicopter parents should step back and watch, study recommends
As part of her PhD at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, Mandy Richardson conducted the world's first data-driven study of parenting classes based on the Respectful Approach intervention. The Respectful Approach, modelled on Resources for Infant Educators (RIE)TM, guides parents to treat young children as capable and independent humans who can flourish if given safe space and freedom from too much adult direction. (2020-07-30)

Therapy helps children with food allergies manage severe anxiety
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has launched the Food Allergy Bravery (FAB) Clinic to help children with a phobia of anaphylaxis. This revolutionary clinic, housed within the Food Allergy Center, is the first in the world to bring together psychologists and food allergy experts to treat food allergic children with severe phobia of anaphylaxis. (2020-07-28)

More than meets the eye
New findings reframe the traditional view of face blindness as a disorder arising strictly from deficits in visual perception of facial features. Findings suggest prosopagnosia may be a more complex disorder rooted in multiple deficits. Findings can help inform the design of tools to improve face recognition in those with the condition. (2020-07-10)

Achievement isn't why more men are majoring in physics, engineering and computer science
Researchers at New York University's Steinhardt School found that the reason there are more undergraduate men than women majoring in physics, engineering and computer science is not because men are higher achievers. On the contrary, the scholars found that men with very low high-school GPAs in math and science and very low SAT math scores were choosing these math-intensive majors just as often as women with much higher math and science achievement. (2020-06-18)

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