Current Congenital Heart Disease News and Events

Current Congenital Heart Disease News and Events, Congenital Heart Disease News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Breakthrough design at UBCO vastly improves mechanical heart valve
New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus may take the current 'gold standard' for heart valves to a new level of reliability. A team of researchers at UBCO's Heart Valve Performance Lab (HVPL) has developed a way to improve overall blood flow through the valves, so the design of mechanical heart valves will more closely match the real thing. (2021-01-26)

Childhood cancer survivors are not more likely to terminate their pregnancies
Study finds they have a reduced likelihood of becoming pregnant, however. (2021-01-25)

Mental health is important to overall health, and heart disease prevention and treatment
Depression and negative psychological health conditions are associated with a less healthy heart and body, while optimism and other positive mental health states are associated with a healthier heart and body. Health care professionals should consider patients' psychological health when evaluating or treating people with or at risk for heart disease. (2021-01-25)

Genetic breakthrough to target care for deadly heart condition
New genetic faults discovered in people with a heart condition that is sometimes inherited in families could transform the diagnosis and treatment of the hidden disease, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Genetics. (2021-01-25)

University of Cincinnati student uses zebrafish to study spinal deformities
Oriana Zinani, a doctoral student in molecular developmental biology at the University of Cincinnati, is part of a team of researchers using zebrafish embryos to study a gene mutation that causes scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine that typically occurs in humans just before puberty. (2021-01-22)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

New study on the role of monocytes in sarcoidosis
The cause of the inflammatory lung disease sarcoidosis is unknown. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have investigated whether a type of immune cell called a monocyte could be a key player in sarcoidosis pathogenesis and explain why some patients develop more severe and chronic disease than others. The study, which is published in The European Respiratory Journal, opens new possibilities for future diagnostic and therapeutic methods. (2021-01-21)

Counting patients social determinants of health may help doctors avert fatal heart attacks
Doctors may be able to predict their patients' risks of fatal coronary heart disease more accurately by taking into account the number of adverse social factors affecting them, according to a new study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2021-01-21)

Mayo Clinic study indicates age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks. Mayo Clinic researchers discuss these sex and age differences in study findings published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2021-01-20)

CRISPR technology to cure sickle cell disease at UIC
The first cases treated with gene-editing technology were recently published in an article co-authored by Dr. Damiano Rondelli, the Michael Reese Professor of Hematology at the UIC College of Medicine. The article reports two patients have been cured of beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease after their own genes were edited with CRISPR-Cas9 technology. The two researchers who invented this technology received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2020. (2021-01-20)

Where COVID-19 hit hardest, sudden deaths outside the hospital increased
A new study comparing the incidence of sudden deaths occurring outside the hospital across New York City's highly diverse neighborhoods with the percentage of positive SARS-CoV-19 tests found that increased sudden deaths during the pandemic correlate to the extent of virus infection in a neighborhood. The analysis appears in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier. (2021-01-18)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease and stroke risk
Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart. (2021-01-18)

Approximately half of AD dementia cases are mild, one-fifth are severe
What percent of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) currently have severe dementia? Do more people have mild disease? Or are the majority suffering with moderate dementia? A new study using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) sheds light on these trends. (2021-01-13)

New research reveals early warning sign for heart disease
The build-up of calcium in a major artery outside of the heart could predict future heart attack or stroke, a new Edith Cowan University led study has demonstrated. (2021-01-13)

New taxonomy of non-skeletal rare disorders with impact on bone
A new paper published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Skeletal Rare Diseases Working Group provides a first taxonomic classification of selected non-skeletal rare congenital disorders with an impact on bone physiology on the basis of phenotypes. The diseases have been described according to the systemic disease; genetic defect; pathophysiology of bone phenotype; and therapy, where available. (2021-01-12)

Enhanced oral uptake of exosomes opens cell therapy alternative
Cell-derived exosomes are effective in treating disease when mixed with the dominant protein in breast milk and given orally, a new Smidt Heart Institute study of laboratory mice shows. The findings, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Extracellular Vesicles, could help develop new oral medications for treating patients with muscular dystrophy and heart failure. (2021-01-12)

Impact of COVID lockdown on aeromedical retrievals in remote parts of Australia
New data released this week by Australian researchers reveals the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown period on aeromedical retrievals in rural and remote regions. (2021-01-12)

COVID-19 pandemic indirectly disrupted heart disease care
Deaths from ischemic heart disease and hypertensive diseases in the United States increased during the COVID-19 pandemic over the prior year, while globally, COVID-19 was associated with significant disruptions in cardiovascular disease testing. These findings are from two papers publishing in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the indirect effects of the pandemic on cardiovascular disease patients and their care. (2021-01-11)

Cardiac MRI shows lower degrees of myocarditis in athletes recovered from COVID-19
In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's medical journal Circulation a group of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) dispute the most recent findings of the incidence of myocarditis in athletes with a history of COVID-19. (2021-01-08)

Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell
Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. (2021-01-07)

Statins may protect the heart from chemotherapy treatment of early breast cancer
Women who take statins, the common cholesterol-lowering medication, during chemotherapy with anthracyclines for early-stage breast cancer are half as likely to require emergency department visits or hospitalization for heart failure in the 5 years after chemotherapy. (2021-01-06)

Common drug may protect hearts from damage caused by breast cancer chemotherapy
New research from UHN's Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMCC) shows statins, commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, may also protect the heart from damaging side-effects of early breast cancer treatment. (2021-01-06)

Dual smoking and vaping doesn't cut cardiovascular risk: Boston University study
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death associated with smoking cigarettes. But as use of e-cigarettes (''vaping'') becomes more popular, including as a way to cut back on cigarettes, little is known about its effect on cardiovascular health. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study, published in the journal Circulation, finds that vaping may not cut risk of cardiovascular disease in the way that most adults use them--in combination with cigarettes. (2021-01-06)

COVID-19 infection linked with higher death rate in acute heart failure patients
Patients with acute heart failure nearly double their risk of dying if they get COVID-19, according to research published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The small, single centre study highlights the need for patients with heart failure to take extra precautions to avoid catching COVID-19. ''Our results support prioritising heart failure patients for COVID-19 vaccination once it is available,'' said study lead investigator Dr. Amardeep Dastidar. (2021-01-06)

In-utero exposures associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer
A recent study shows that thyroid cancer is related to in-utero exposures. (2021-01-05)

Heart transplantations: prospects of success increase with larger case volumes
Heart transplantations: prospects of success increase with larger case volumes The survival probabilities for patients undergoing surgery are higher in hospitals where heart transplants are performed more frequently. (2020-12-28)

Chest pain risk assessment may reduce treatment disparities
The use of a standardized tool for assessing the risk of serious outcomes in patients with chest pain was associated with women at high risk receiving comparable care to men, according to new research published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Care received by women at low and intermediate risk was consistent with current clinical recommendations. Men received more stress testing and were more likely to be hospitalized than women. (2020-12-23)

CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 5 Issue 2
The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the second issue of Volume 5. This issue brings together important research from authors in the USA and China, and includes new papers on 'Current Management Strategies in Patients with Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation' and 'Epicardial Adipose Tissue in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.' (2020-12-22)

Zika virus affects eye development before but not after birth
A new study from UC Davis finds that Zika infection during the first trimester of pregnancy can impact fetal retinal development and cause congenital ocular anomalies. The virus does not appear to affect ocular growth postnatally. (2020-12-18)

Impaired blood vessel and kidney function underlie heart disease risk in people with HIV
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired blood vessel function, which increases risk of heart and blood vessel-disease. The increased heart disease risk is especially pronounced in people with HIV who also have kidney disease. The increased heart disease risk remains regardless of HIV severity or use of antiretroviral therapy. (2020-12-17)

ACE2 protein protects against severe COVID-19: Study
Female COVID-19 patients face less severe disease complications and a lower risk of dying than male patients thanks to hormones and chromosomes that contribute to a stronger immune response, according to new research from a University of Alberta-led team. (2020-12-17)

Aboriginal women share their stories on keeping the heart strong
More than a decade after committing $130+ billion to Closing the Gap, there has been little improvement in health outcomes experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. (2020-12-17)

Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems in the US
Significant racial disparities exist in heart-related complications among pregnant and postpartum women in the United States. Despite improvements in recent years, Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems. Clinicians treating pregnant women should be aware of the heart risks associated with pregnancy and should closely monitor women who are at increased risk. (2020-12-16)

Novel biomarkers predict the development of incident heart failure
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital have discovered several new biomarkers that are associated with incident heart failure. In a new study, several inflammatory biomarkers and cell energy metabolites were linked to an increased risk of incident heart failure. (2020-12-16)

Elite soccer players help define normal heart measures in competitive athletes
Analyses of professional soccer players' heart test results provide insights on athletes' cardiac structure and function. The hearts of elite soccer players frequently exhibit electrical and structural patterns that are above guideline-defined normal ranges. (2020-12-16)

Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: study
Women face a 20 per cent higher risk than men of dying or having heart failure during the five years following a heart attack, according to a new study from University of Alberta cardiology researchers. (2020-12-15)

Study reveals networks of genes involved in congenital heart disease
A group researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco led by Benoit Bruneau have made inroads into understanding what genes are improperly deployed in some cases of congenital heart disease. Their study, published in Developmental Cell, could point toward new ways to prevent or treat one of the most common birth defects. (2020-12-14)

Test your heart health by climbing stairs
Climbing four flights of stairs in less than a minute indicates good heart health, according to research presented at EACVI - Best of Imaging 2020, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'The stairs test is an easy way to check your heart health,' said study author Dr. Jesús Peteiro, a cardiologist at University Hospital A Coruña, Spain. (2020-12-11)

Insufficient screening for heart damage after noncardiac surgery puts patients at risk
About five percent of patients experience heart muscle injury around the time of their surgery for a noncardiac condition, yet guideline recommendations to identify patients at risk using biomarkers are not being followed. A five-year study in Alberta, Canada appearing in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, published by Elsevier, determined that the recommended biomarker screening is very much underutilized. (2020-12-10)

Predicting heart disease from the skin
Jefferson researchers find that the genetic underpinnings of a skin disorder at birth indicate future heart problems. (2020-12-10)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.