Current Consortium News and Events

Current Consortium News and Events, Consortium News Articles.
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Microbiome boost may help corals resist bleaching
Providing corals with cocktails of natural probiotics could enhance their tolerance to stress and reduce mortality in coral bleaching events. (2021-02-23)

International research network identifies triggers for severe course of liver cirrhosis
Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a common cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. In ACLF the progressive loss of function of the scarred liver can no longer be compensated (acute decompensation). As a result, other organs such as the kidney or brain fail. The triggers for acute decompensation of liver cirrhosis and an ACLF are most frequently bacterial infections, liver inflammation caused by alcohol, or a combination of both factors. (2021-02-02)

No overall difference in concussion recovery time for male and female college athletes
Researchers found female and male collegiate athletes take approximately the same amount of time to recover from a concussion, with subtle differences in recovery time depending on the type of sports being played and the division level of the sport. The findings suggest that equity in access to sports medical care among college athletes may be contributing to these similar outcomes. (2021-01-26)

Lack of sleep, stress can lead to symptoms resembling concussion
A new study suggests that a lot of people might be going through life with symptoms that resemble concussion - a finding supporting researchers' argument that athletes recovering from a brain injury should be assessed and treated on a highly individualized basis. (2021-01-22)

Study updates breast cancer risk estimates for women with no family history
A new multi-institution study led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic pathologist, provides more accurate estimates of breast cancer risk for U.S. women who harbor inherited mutations in breast cancer predisposition genes. The findings of the CARRIERS Consortium study, published Jan. 20 in The New England Journal of Medicine, may allow health care providers to better assess the risk of breast cancer in women ? many of whom have no family history of breast cancer. (2021-01-21)

Study demonstrates efficacy of new treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1-related tumors
Based on preclinical studies of an investigational drug to treat peripheral nerve tumors, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) as part of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium have shown that the drug, cabozantinib, reduces tumor volume and pain in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results of the Phase 2 clinical trial, co-chaired by Michael J. Fisher, MD at CHOP, were published recently in Nature Medicine. (2021-01-14)

New PTSD biotypes enables improved tests, sheds light on divergent treatments efficacy
Researchers from the PTSD Systems Biology Consortium identified distinct biotypes for post-traumatic stress disorder, the first of their kind for any psychological disorder. These biotypes can refine the development of screening tools and may explain the varying efficacy of PTSD treatments. PTSD diagnosis is complicated by over-reliance on self-reporting of patient symptoms, particularly underreporting signs of distress due to perceived stigma. Researchers identified two PTSD biotypes with differing genetic markers and underlying mechanisms of disease. (2021-01-14)

Mapping the introduction of the COVID-19 epidemic in the United Kingdom using genomic analysis
The SARS-CoV-2 virus was introduced to the United Kingdom well over 1,000 times in early 2020, according to researchers who analyzed more than 50,000 viral sequences from the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. (2021-01-08)

Most countries are violating international law during the COVID-19 pandemic: Legal experts
In 2019, the Global Health Law Consortium, hosted at York U, analyzed key aspects of the International Health Regulations (IHR) to authoritatively interpret what countries are legally allowed to do during public health crises like Ebola & SARS. This work became even more relevant when COVID-19 began spreading around the world early this year; the Consortium members reviewed how countries reacted to the outbreak based on the IHRs that legally bind 196 countries (2020-12-03)

Scientists organize to tackle crisis of coral bleaching
An international consortium of scientists has created the first-ever common framework for increasing comparability of research findings on coral bleaching. (2020-11-23)

Folding of SARS-CoV2 genome reveals drug targets -- and preparation for 'SARS-CoV3'
For the first time, an international research alliance has observed the RNA folding structures of the SARS-CoV2 genome with which the virus controls the infection process. Since these structures are very similar among various beta corona viruses, the scientists not only laid the foundation for the targeted development of novel drugs for treating COVID-19, but also for future occurrences of infection with new corona viruses that may develop in the future. (2020-11-20)

Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine analyzed more than 15,000 cranial radiographs from nearly 2,000 participants to create the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS). (2020-11-17)

Genetic determinants of fertility and ongoing natural selection in humans
A recent study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting suggests genetic variants may be associated with reproductive success. (2020-10-29)

Immunotherapy combo halts rare, stage 4 sarcoma in teen
The patient, whose tumor responded within two weeks after receiving the combination, resumed normal activity and was in a complete remission at the time of the report. (2020-10-16)

New genetic knowledge on the causes of severe COVID-19
A proportion of the most severe COVID-19 cases can be explained by genetic defects in the patients' immune system. Professor Trine Mogensen from Aarhus University, Denmark, is participating in an international research consortium as the only Danish researcher, and thereby helping to generate new knowledge which may in the future lead to early and improved treatment of those who are affected by severe COVID-19. (2020-09-29)

How loss of single gene fuels deadly childhood brain cancer
UC San Diego researchers describe how the functional loss of a single gene negatively impacts neural development and promotes the growth of a particularly deadly form of pediatric brain cancer. (2020-09-10)

Tumour gene test could help to predict ovarian cancer prognosis
A global team of medical researchers led by UNSW have developed a test that could help to predict survival for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and pave the way towards personalised treatment. (2020-08-17)

New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe
An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of caesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighbouring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This study was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-07-16)

Scientists achieve first complete assembly of human X chromosome
Although the current human reference genome is the most accurate and complete vertebrate genome ever produced, there are still gaps in the DNA sequence, even after two decades of improvements. Now, for the first time, scientists have determined the complete sequence of a human chromosome from one end to the other ('telomere to telomere') with no gaps and an unprecedented level of accuracy. (2020-07-14)

Call for immunology to return to the wild
In an article published today in Science, a multidisciplinary research team from more than 10 universities and research institutes outlines how integrating a more diverse set of species and environments could enhance the biomedical research cycle. (2020-07-02)

Study quantifies socioeconomic benefits of satellites for harmful algal bloom detection
A Resources for the Future (RFF) and NASA VALUABLES Consortium study published in GeoHealth examines the benefits of using satellite data to detect harmful algal blooms and manage recreational advisories in Utah Lake. The study finds that the use of such data can result in socioeconomic benefits worth hundreds of thousands of dollars from one harmful algal bloom event. (2020-06-24)

TERAVOLT registry tracks outcomes among thoracic cancer patients sickened by COVID-19
New data from TERAVOLT, a global consortium that tracks outcomes of people with thoracic cancers affected by COVID-19, offers clues as to why they experienced a high death rate of 33% when the coronavirus swept across Europe. (2020-06-16)

NIST develops benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a way for laboratories to determine how accurately they can detect large mutations. The new method and the benchmark material enable researchers, clinical labs and commercial technology developers to better identify large genome changes they now miss and will help them reduce false detections of genome changes. (2020-06-15)

Fewer complications after organ transplantation
A large international study coordinated by University Hospital Regensburg and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has demonstrated the safety of new cell therapy approaches for use in kidney transplant recipients. Transplant recipients were shown to require lower levels of immunosuppression in order to prevent organ rejection. This reduces the risk of side effects such as viral infections. Results from this study have been published in The Lancet.* (2020-06-10)

Survey identifies learning opportunities related to health impacts of climate change
An international survey of Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education (GCCHE) membership found that the majority of members -- health professions schools and programs, including medical, nursing, and public health -- offer learning opportunities related to the health impacts of climate change, yet many also encountered challenges in instituting or developing curricula. The results of the survey provide a baseline assessment of the state of climate-health education internationally among health professions institutions. (2020-05-28)

Heart surgery stalled as COVID-19 spread
In two recent journal articles, Dr. Marc Ruel explores how hospitals worldwide scaled back on heart surgeries as the pandemic hit, and how they can resume those operations in a world still plagued by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-05-28)

Critical window for re-infection with HIV after stem cell transplantation
So far, allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of severe blood cancers has been the only medical intervention to have cured at least three people infected with the HI virus. It is still unclear why this procedure was unable to cure other HIV-infected patients successfully. In a study with 16 HIV infected people, scientists identified a critical time window after an allogeneic stem cell transplantation, during which the donor cells could be particularly vulnerable. (2020-05-14)

Parkinson's disease may start in the gut
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the University of North Carolina in the USA have mapped out the cell types behind various brain disorders. The findings are published in Nature Genetics and offer a roadmap for the development of new therapies to target neurological and psychiatric disorders. One interesting finding was that cells from the gut's nervous system are involved in Parkinson's disease, indicating that the disease may start there. (2020-04-27)

Understanding brain tumors in children
The causes of 40% of all cases of certain medulloblastomas -- dangerous brain tumors affecting children -- are hereditary. These are the findings of a recent genetic analysis carried out by scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and numerous colleagues around the world. A genetic defect that occurs in 15% of these children plays a key role by destabilizing the production of proteins. The researchers suspect that protein metabolism defects could be a previously underestimated cause of other types of cancer. (2020-04-01)

GARDP partners with Japanese pharmaceutical in pursuit of new antibiotics
The Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership (GARDP) has today announced an agreement with Daiichi Sankyo for GARDP to access and screen the Daiichi Sankyo chemical library. (2020-03-12)

A close-up look at mutated DNA in cancer cells
PCAWG, the largest cancer research consortium in the world, has set itself the task of improving our understanding of genetic mutations in tumors. A new study by the international research group, to which the MDC substantially contributed, is now being published in the journal Nature. (2020-02-05)

Major Asia gene study to help doctors battle disease
'Under-representation of Asian populations in genetic studies has meant that medical relevance for more than half of the human population is reduced,' one researcher said. (2020-01-28)

'To safeguard people from chemical pollution, another approach is warranted'
As many as nine million people (16% of all deaths worldwide) die yearly as a result of air, water and soil pollution. Although there is extensive evidence that exposure to specific chemicals can lead to disease, the current research approach does not provide sufficient insight to intervene. In an article in Science, Utrecht professor Roel Vermeulen and his colleagues therefore call for a systematic approach, at a scale comparable to that of the human genome. (2020-01-23)

Scientists show we don't need horses to treat diphtheria
A project taking the first steps towards ending the use of horses to treat diphtheria has succeeded. Funded by the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. and carried out at the Institute of Biochemistry, Biotechnology, and Bioinformatics at the Technische Universität Braunschweig in Germany, the project created human antibodies capable of blocking the poisonous toxin that causes diphtheria. The results were published Friday in Scientific Reports (a Nature research journal). (2020-01-21)

NASA's TESS helps astronomers study red-giant stars, examine a too-close planet
Iowa State astronomers are part of an international team that has been analyzing data from NASA's TESS Mission. The astronomers describe their study of two red-giant stars -- older, 'retired' stars no longer burning hydrogen in their cores -- in a paper recently published by The Astrophysical Journal. The study details an interesting case of planetary evolution and demonstrates how star studies can be an important part of the mission's search for planets beyond our solar system. (2019-11-19)

Breakthrough in malaria research
An international scientific consortium led by the cell biologists Volker Heussler from the University of Bern and Oliver Billker from the Umeå University in Sweden has for the first time systematically investigated the genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium throughout its life cycle in a large-scale experiment. The researchers were able to identify hundreds of targets that are urgently needed in drug and vaccine development to eradicate the disease. (2019-11-14)

High rates of vaccine-preventable infections in pediatric transplant patients
University of Colorado researchers have found lower vaccination rates among children who receive liver transplants, increasing the risk of sickness for those children, who already face significant health issues. The findings are discussed in a 'Research Letter' included in the November 12, 2019 issue of JAMA and also call attention to data that CU School of Medicine faculty members published earlier this year in JAMA Pediatrics. (2019-11-13)

Successful collaboration of community -- and state-based heart disease prevention programs focused on
A collaborative of community -- and state-based heart disease prevention programs helped states achieve major goals for eliminating health disparities, according to new research. Researchers said the success of the eight-state program was taking the collaborative power of individual organizations and scaling it to reach people where they are, something they think could be replicated in other areas across the country. (2019-11-11)

New tool predicts five-year risk of chronic kidney disease
A new risk calculator tool that uses a mix of variables including age, hypertension, and diabetes status can be used to predict accurately whether someone is likely to develop chronic kidney disease within five years. (2019-11-08)

Complete genome of devastating soybean pathogen assembled
An international research collaboration has successfully assembled the complete genome sequence of the pathogen that causes the devastating disease Asian soybean rust. (2019-10-03)

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