Current Conspiracy Theories News and Events

Current Conspiracy Theories News and Events, Conspiracy Theories News Articles.
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Scientists propose a new heavy particle similar to the Higgs boson
Unlike the Higgs boson, discovered at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in 2012 after a 40-year quest, the new particle proposed by these researchers is so heavy that it could not be produced directly even in this collider The University of Granada is among the participants in this major scientific advancement in Theoretical Physics, which could help unravel the mysteries of dark matter (2021-02-23)

The mass of Cygnus X-1's black hole challenges stellar evolution models
Weighing in at roughly 21 solar masses, the black hole in the X-ray binary system Cygnus X-1 is so massive that it challenges current stellar evolution models, a new study reveals. (2021-02-18)

CT scans of Egyptian mummy reveal new details about the death of a pivotal pharaoh
A CT scan study of the mummy of Pharaoh Seqenenre-Taa-II, an Egyptian ruler whose death eventually helped reunite the kingdom, revealed new details about how the king died. A recent paper suggests that the pharaoh died close to the battlefield and was ceremoniously executed by several people using Hyksos weapons. Additionally, the computer-processed X-rays revealed his embalmers had skillfully concealed some of the wounds, implying professional mummification of the body, despite its poor preservation. (2021-02-17)

Supercomputer turns back cosmic clock
Astronomers have tested a method for reconstructing the state of the early Universe by applying it to 4000 simulated universes using the ATERUI II supercomputer at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). They found that together with new observations the method can set better constraints on inflation, one of the most enigmatic events in the history of the Universe. The method can shorten the observation time required to distinguish between various inflation theories. (2021-02-16)

The smallest galaxies in our universe bring more about dark matter to light
Our universe is dominated by a mysterious matter known as dark matter. Its name comes from the fact that dark matter does not absorb, reflect or emit electromagnetic radiation, making it difficult to detect. (2021-02-16)

Strange creatures accidentally discovered beneath Antarctica's ice shelves
Prior research has suggested that the watery depths below the Antarctic ice shelves are too cold and nutrient poor to sustain much life. But a new study from British Antarctic Survey published in Frontiers in Marine Science reveals the discovery of a colony of sponges and other animals attached to a boulder on the sea floor - challenging researchers' understanding about the existence of life in extreme environments. (2021-02-15)

Citizens versus the internet
The online world is driven by the logic of the attention economy: Users' attention is a precious currency, and online environments are designed to capture and steer that attention. How can users respond to these challenges of the digital age and how might the design of the online world be improved? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the University of Bristol has addressed these questions from the perspective of behavioral science. (2021-02-12)

Which conspiracy theory do you believe in?
Everyone believes in at least one conspiracy theory, according to conspiracy researchers. Conspiracy theories aren't reserved for angry Republicans in the United States. Do you think Biden stole the election? (2021-02-11)

New machine learning theory raises questions about nature of science
A novel computer algorithm, or set of rules, that accurately predicts the orbits of planets in the solar system could be adapted to better predict and control the behavior of the plasma that fuels fusion facilities designed to harvest on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars. (2021-02-11)

How governments address COVID-19 misinformation--for better or for worse
In a new article in the Journal of Public Health Policy, legal scholars at NYU School of Global Public Health and the global health organization Vital Strategies identify five approaches countries have taken to address misinformation about COVID-19. (2021-02-01)

Paving the way for effective field theories
This special issue, published in EPJ A, presents a coherent collection of work by theoretical experts from around the world regarding the use of effective field theories. Several unanswered questions are addressed and clarified, leading to detailed assessments of the philosophical foundations of effective field theories. (2021-02-01)

Nuclear physicist's voyage towards a mythical island
Theories were introduced as far back as the 1960s about the possible existence of superheavy elements. Their most long-lived atomic nuclei could give rise to a so-called ''island of stability'' far beyond the element uranium. However, a new study, led by nuclear physicists at Lund University, shows that a 50-year-old nuclear physics manifesto must now be revised. (2021-01-26)

Positive messaging plays a key role in increasing COVID-19 mask compliance
Among his first acts, President Joe Biden is asking Americans to wear a mask to help curb coronavirus. Research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests positive messages of unity and togetherness are critical to the effort, and work better than messages of fear or instructiveness. (2021-01-21)

Stop global roll out of 5G networks until safety is confirmed, urges expert
We should err on the side of caution and stop the global roll out of 5G (fifth generation) telecoms networks until we are certain this technology is completely safe, urges an expert in an opinion piece published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2021-01-18)

Helium nuclei at the surface of heavy nuclei discovered
Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an experiment the existence of preformed helium nuclei at the surface of several tin isotopes could be identified in a reaction. The results confirm a theory, which predicts the formation of helium clusters in low-density nuclear matter and at the surface of heavy nuclei. (2021-01-15)

COVID-19 deaths really are different. But best practices for ICU care should still apply
COVID-19 deaths are indeed different from other lung failure deaths, according to two recent studies, with 56% of COVID-19 patients dying primarily from the lung damage caused by the virus, compared with 22% of those whose lungs fail due to other causes. But, the researchers conclude, the kind of care needed to help sustain people through the worst cases of all forms of lung failure is highly similar, and just needs to be fine-tuned. (2021-01-15)

Autism theory 25 years in the making
A unifying explanation of the cause of autism and the reason for its rising prevalence has eluded scientists for decades, but a theoretical model published in the journal Medical Hypotheses describes the cause as a combination of socially valued traits, common in autism, and any number of co-occurring disabilities. (2021-01-08)

Social media use increases belief in COVID-19 misinformation
The more people rely on social media as their main news source the more likely they are to believe misinformation about the pandemic, according to a survey analysis. The study also found that levels of worry about COVID-19 increased the strength of people's belief in that misinformation. Two factors weakened beliefs in false information: having faith in scientists and a preference for ''discussion heterogeneity,'' meaning people liked talking with others who held different beliefs. (2020-12-14)

Americans must be vigilant against anti-vax rumors in 'fractured media universe'
As the world watches how UK residents respond to COVID-19 vaccinations, three leading experts on the virus are urging Americans and the US government to be vigilant against anti-vaccination advocates and their 'rumors, misinformation, and conspiracy theories in a fractured media universe.' (2020-12-10)

Key building block for organic molecules discovered in meteorites
Scientists from Japan and the USA have confirmed the presence in meteorites of a key organic molecule which may have been used to build other organic molecules, including some used by life. The discovery validates theories of the formation of organic compounds in extraterrestrial environments. (2020-12-07)

UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers. (2020-12-03)

A French team has improved the measurement of a fundamental physical constant
A team of French researchers has just conducted the most accurate measurement to date of the fine-structure constant, which characterizes the strength of interaction between light and charged elementary particles, such as electrons. This value has just been determined with an accuracy of 11 significant digits; improving the precision of the previous measurement by a factor of 3. (2020-12-02)

How the insect got its wings: Scientists (at last!) tell the tale
How insect wings evolved has puzzled biologists for over a century. Finally, a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, has shown that the insect wing evolved from an outgrowth on the crustacean leg that was incorporated into the animal's body wall. (2020-12-01)

Breaking the skill limit, pianists attain more delicate touch
Japanese scientists discovered a training method to further improve the delicate touch of pianists by optimizing the method rather than increase the amount of training. They developed a system that freely controls the weight of piano keys using a haptic device, which enables to control the strength and direction of the force. The results of experiments showed that enhancing the somatosensory function of fingertips with AHT could improve the accuracy of keystrokes. (2020-11-25)

Xenophobia in Germany is declining, but old resentments are paired with new radicalism
Xenophobia in Germany has decreased, but right-wing extremist attitudes remain high. There is also evidence of ''radicalisation and disinhibition among those with far-right views''. These are key findings of the representative Leipzig Authoritarianism Study. Professors Oliver Decker and Elmar Brähler from the Competence Centre for Right-Wing Extremism and Democracy Research at Leipzig University presented the study results today (18 November) at the Federal Press Conference (BPK) in Berlin. (2020-11-18)

Like fire and ice: Why societies are increasingly fragmenting
Scientists at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna show that the accelerating fragmentation of society - often referred to as filter bubbles -- is a direct consequence of the growing number of social contacts. According to their new theory of social fragmentation, societies can only be either cohesive or fragmented, with abrupt changes from one state to the other at certain tipping points. Filter bubble societies are a risk for democracies. (2020-11-17)

UChicago scientists uncover secrets to designing brain-like devices
Pritzker Molecular Engineering researchers predicted design rules for devices that mimic what occurs in our brain's neurons and synapses. (2020-11-10)

COVID Misinformation a Roadblock to Curbing Pandemic
Two new studies suggest that the spread of misinformation about COVID-19 will make it harder for communities to bring the pandemic under control. stereotypes and fears of stigma may be barriers to COVID testing, a finding that confirms previous studies about stigma around HIV and Ebola. And believing COVID conspiracies makes people less likely to support public health policies to reduce the spread of the virus. (2020-11-09)

Game 'pre-bunks' political misinformation by letting players undermine democracy
An online game helps ''inoculate'' players against fake news by showing them how political misinformation is created and circulated. Launched today, Harmony Square has been created by Cambridge University psychologists with support from US Department of Homeland Security. Accompanying study shows that a single play reduces the perceived reliability of misinformation in users. (2020-11-06)

Understanding the spread of infectious diseases
Physicists at Münster University (Germany) have shown in model simulations that the COVID-19 infection rates decrease significantly through social distancing. For this, they combined the dynamical density functional theory to describe interacting particles and the SIR model, a theory to describe the spread of infectious diseases. (2020-11-04)

COVID-19 a "golden opportunity" for terror organisations to intensify their propaganda
The uncertainty and confusion caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is being ''widely exploited by terror groups for spinning a plethora of sinister schemes'', which could lead to a new tide of violence against people and governments. (2020-10-30)

Election 2020 chatter on Twitter busy with bots, conspiracy theorists, USC study finds
USC scientists find right-leaning bot accounts outnumber left-leaning ones 4-to-1. A combination of right-leaning bots and users were responsible for millions of election-related tweets in the runup to Nov. 3. Besides Russia, foreign interference also has come from Nigeria and Ghana. (2020-10-28)

Study tracks public concerns on Twitter about COVID-19
Twitter users initially didn't feel positive about the state of the economy, prevention, treatment and recovery concerning COVID-19. That changed by the end of March 2020. In contrast, throughout the period examined from January to May 2020, the public, in general, felt negative about the way the pandemic had been handled by political leadership. (2020-10-28)

Facebook users spread Russian propaganda less often when they know source
Russia uses Facebook and other social media to polarize Americans, particularly those at the extreme ends of the political spectrum. A unique study that enrolled 1,500 Facebook users found that they are less likely to share content when they learn that it is part of a foreign propaganda campaign. (2020-10-15)

Popularity of COVID-19 conspiracies and links to vaccine 'hesitancy' revealed by international study
Study of UK, US, Ireland, Mexico and Spain suggests ''Wuhan lab'' myth is seen as reliable by between a fifth and a third of populations. Older people and those who are good with numbers are better at spotting fake coronavirus news, according to research. People who rate coronavirus conspiracy theories as more reliable say they are much less likely to get vaccinated. (2020-10-13)

A RUDN University physicist simplified the Einstein-lovelock theory for black holes
Allowing for quantum corrections, the Einstein-Lovelock theory describes black holes with an equation that contains an infinite number of terms. However, according to a RUDN University physicist, the geometry of a black hole in this theory can be presented in a compact form, and a limited number of terms can suffice to describe the observed values. This could help scientists study black holes in theories with quantum corrections to Einstein's equations. (2020-10-03)

Yan report's claims that SARS-CoV-2 was created in a Chinese lab are misleading, unethical
In the first published scholarly peer reviews of this controversial research, reviewers Robert Gallo, Takahiko Koyama, and Adam Lauring, write that its ''claims are at times baseless and are not supported by the data and methods used.'' (2020-10-02)

Vaccine opposition online uniting around 'civil liberties' argument
Anti-vaccination discourse on Facebook increased in volume over the last decade, coalescing around the argument that refusing to vaccinate is a civil right, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Public Health. (2020-10-01)

A question of reality
Physicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H. This review, 'Real or Not Real: that is the question', explores Bell's inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their relevance to quantum information and its applications. (2020-09-24)

Impurities enhance polymer LED efficiencies
New research published in EPJ B reveals that the higher-than-expected efficiency of PLEDs can be reached through interactions between triplet excitons, and impurities embedded in their polymer layers. (2020-09-24)

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