Current Constipation News and Events

Current Constipation News and Events, Constipation News Articles.
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New treatment in development for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation
Researchers devised a plan to treat IBS with constipation by delivering chenodeoxycholic acid in a bilayered capsule, finding that this mode of delivery could decrease colon cramping and thus produce a better patient experience. (2020-12-08)

Autism study suggests connection between repetitive behaviors, gut problems
In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties. (2020-12-02)

Specific bacterium in the gut linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have detected a connection between Brachyspira, a genus of bacteria in the intestines, and IBS -- especially the form that causes diarrhea. Although the discovery needs confirmation in larger studies, there is hope that it might lead to new remedies for many people with irritable bowel syndrome. (2020-11-25)

Vitamin D: Consumption of high-dose food supplements is unnecessary
The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has prepared a health risk assessment for products sold on the market as food supplements containing a daily dose of chole-calciferol -- the precursor to active vitamin D -- of 50 or 100 micrograms. These products are representative of certain high-dose preparations used by some consumers to increase their intake of vitamin D. (2020-10-20)

Gut bacteria could be responsible for side effect of Parkinson's drug
Bacteria in the small intestine can deaminate levodopa, the main drug that is used to treat Parkinson's disease. Bacterial processing of the unabsorbed fractions of the drug results in a metabolite that reduces gut motility. These findings were described in the journal BMC Biology on 20 October by scientists from the University of Groningen. Since the disease is already associated with constipation, processing of the drug by gut bacteria may worsen gastrointestinal complications. (2020-10-19)

Asthma and food allergies during childhood associated with increased risk of IBS
Those with IBS at 16 were almost twice as likely to have had asthma at the age of 12 (11.2% vs 6.7%). Almost half of children with IBS at 16 (40.7%) reported food hypersensitivity at 12 years (compared to 29.2% of children without IBS at 16). (2020-10-11)

More than 40% of women suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth
Women are 2-3 times more likely to suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth than at any other time in their life, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-10-09)

Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found. (2020-09-28)

Studies of gut microbiota and contractility help deal with chronic constipation
Chronic constipation (CC) remains a serious medical and social problem because the complexity of diagnosis, the lack of a single approach to treatment, and unsatisfactory treatment results. The causes of constipation are varied - from the abnormal anatomical structure of the large intestine and its location in the abdominal cavity to impaired neurohumoral regulation of its motility, endocrine pathology, psychogenic factors, poor nutrition, as well as a combination of these factors. (2020-08-20)

Can a healthy diet reduce risk of Parkinson's?
While movement problems are the main symptoms of Parkinson's disease, people with the disease often have non-motor symptoms such as constipation, daytime sleepiness and depression 10 or more years before the movement problems start. A new study suggests that eating a healthy diet in middle age may be linked to having fewer of these preceding symptoms. The study is published in the August 19, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-08-19)

GI symptoms linked to behavioral problems in children, especially those with autism
A new UC Davis Health study found that common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and bloating are linked to troubling sleep problems, self-harm and physical complaints in preschool children. According to the study, published Aug. 6 in Autism Research, these GI symptoms are much more common and potentially disruptive in young kids with autism. (2020-08-10)

Multidisciplinary approach more effective for gut disorders: study
Researchers from the University of Melbourne and St Vincent's Hospital in Australia have conducted a trial involving 144 patients to compare the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary clinic - involving gastroenterologists, dieticians, psychiatrists and physiotherapists - with usual gastroenterology specialist-only care. (2020-07-15)

New review helps translate probiotic science into practical primary care recommendations
Probiotic supplements are widely available and are promoted as a general way to support the gut microbiome and promote health. A new publication in the Journal of Family Practice summarizes the latest evidence on using probiotics for a variety of specific health conditions, providing practical recommendations to assist primary care physicians in advising their patients. The article, authored by current International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics board members. (2020-06-01)

Four of ten adults worldwide have functional gastrointestinal disorders
For every ten adults in the world, four suffer from functional gastrointestinal disorders of varying severity. This is shown by a study of more than 73,000 people in 33 countries. University of Gothenburg scientists are among those now presenting these results. (2020-05-27)

Spider venom key to pain relief without side-effects
Molecules in tarantula venom could be used as an alternative to opioid pain killers for people seeking chronic pain relief. (2020-04-13)

Unearthing gut secret paves way for targeted treatments
Scientists have identified a specific type of sensory nerve ending in the gut and how these communicate pain or discomfort to the brain, paving the way for targeted treatments for common conditions like ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome or chronic constipation. While understanding of the gut's neurosensory abilities has grown rapidly, two great mysteries have been where and how different types of sensory nerve endings in the gut lie. (2020-03-29)

Why is appendicitis not always diagnosed in the emergency department?
A new study examines the factors associated with a potentially missed diagnosis of appendicitis in children and adults in the emergency department. (2020-03-16)

Electrical stimulation helps treat constipation in clinical trial
Electrical stimulation benefited women with constipation in a recent clinical trial published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. (2020-03-04)

Increased use of antibiotics may predispose to Parkinson's disease
Higher exposure to commonly used oral antibiotics is linked to an increased risk of Parkinson's disease according to a recently published Finnish study. The strongest associations were found for broad spectrum antibiotics and those that act against against anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The timing of antibiotic exposure also seemed to matter. (2019-11-22)

Fecal transplantation to treat patients with Parkinson's disease: Hope or hype?
Amsterdam, NL, November 15, 2019 - Constipation is a common complaint in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Fecal microbiome transplantation (FMT) and pre- and probiotics are potential options for treating constipation and restoring the microbiome of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but scientists warn that clinical data are scarce, and more research is needed before supporting their use. They present their findings in a review article in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (2019-11-15)

Targeting alpha-synuclein in the gut may slow down Parkinson's disease
Aggregates of the protein alpha-synuclein arising in the gut may play a key role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Investigators are testing the hypothesis that by targeting the enteric nervous system with a compound that can inhibit the intracellular aggregation of alpha-synuclein, they can restore enteric functioning in the short term, and possibly slow the progressive deterioration of the central nervous system in the long term. (2019-11-13)

Cracking the colon code -- new light shed on gut function
New insights into how the colon functions and actually expels its contents have been revealed for the first time following decades of study by Flinders University researchers. It promises new diagnostics tools and treatments for gastrointestinal disorders to address problems with bowel movements leading to constipation, diarrhea and pain, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. (2019-10-29)

Best medications to reduce drooling for those with developmental disability
A new study has revealed the most effective medications to reduce drooling in young people with a developmental disability, which can affect their socialisation, relationships and community life. (2019-09-30)

Popular pain medication associated with greater risk of hypoglycemia
As the opioid tramadol has grown in popularity so too have documented cases of adverse effects. In a new study, researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at UC San Diego show that patients who take tramadol are at greater risk for hypoglycemia, abnormally low blood sugar. (2019-08-28)

Opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy
National private insurance claims data were used to examine opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy and return visits for complications. Opioids are commonly used after tonsillectomy, although American Academy of Otolaryngology clinical practice guidelines recommend nonopioids such as NSAIDs. This analysis included 2016 and 2017 claims data coded for tonsillectomy for nearly 16,000 children; nearly 60% of whom had one or more prescription drug claims for opioids between seven days before to one day after tonsillectomy. (2019-08-08)

Six in 10 children receive opioids after tonsillectomy
Sixty percent of privately insured children undergoing tonsil removal received opioids -- with average prescriptions lasting about six to 10 days -- a new study finds. (2019-08-08)

Researchers take key step toward cancer treatments that leave healthy cells unharmed
Researchers have opened up a possible avenue for new cancer therapies that don't have the side effects that oftentimes accompany many current cancer treatments by identifying a protein modification that specifically supports survival of tumor cells. (2019-08-05)

Autism health challenges could be explained by problem behaviors
For years, researchers have documented both gastrointestinal issues and problematic behaviors, such as aggression, in many children with autism spectrum disorder. (2019-06-27)

Serotonin linked to somatic awareness, a condition long thought to be imaginary
An international team spearheaded by researchers at McGill University has discovered a biological mechanism that could explain heightened somatic awareness, a condition where patients experience physical discomforts for which there is no physiological explanation. (2019-06-19)

Large international study finds diabetes drug cuts cardiovascular and kidney problems
A clinical trial that followed more than 9,900 people in 24 countries has found that the drug dulaglutide reduced cardiovascular events and kidney problems in middle-aged and older people with type 2 diabetes. During more than five years of follow-up, cardiovascular events like heart attacks and strokes were reduced by 12% in people taking dulaglutide compared to people taking a placebo. This effect was seen in both men and women with or without previous cardiovascular disease. (2019-06-09)

Combination therapy advisable for bowel disorder IBS
The more abnormalities in intestinal and brain function that IBS sufferers have, the more severe their symptoms of this functional bowel disorder, and the more adversely their everyday life is affected. This is shown by a Sahlgrenska Academy study indicating that patients with IBS should get treatments for different abnormalities simultaneously, to improve both bowel function and signaling from the brain to the gut. (2019-05-15)

A moody gut often accompanies depression -- new study helps explain why
A new study suggests that depression and GI trouble sometimes spring from the same source -- low serotonin -- and identifies a potential treatment that could ease both conditions simultaneously. (2019-05-07)

Preschoolers with chronic constipation tend to be picky eaters
In the first study of its kind in the US, researchers found that normally developing preschool children with chronic constipation have underlying sensory issues that contribute to their difficulties with toileting behaviors. These children are often picky eaters who might be overly sensitive to food textures, tastes, or odors. They also might have an exaggerated response to noises, bright lights, or other sensory stimuli. Findings were published in the Journal of Pediatrics. (2019-04-18)

The involvement of the gut in Parkinson's disease: hype or hope?
There is growing evidence that at least in some patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the disease may begin in the gut. Writing in a special supplement to the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, experts explore the last two decades of research about the gut-brain axis in PD and look ahead at the possible development and impact of these research areas in the next two decades. (2019-02-07)

See-through fish aid scientists in autism-related breakthrough
University of Miami researchers have discovered a clue in the humble zebrafish's digestive tract that, one day, could help people on the autism spectrum alleviate one of the most common yet least studied symptoms of their disorder: gastrointestinal distress. (2019-02-06)

Scientists developed new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, have developed a new mouse model of Hirschsprung's disease and associated enterocolitis and shed light on the disease progression. (2019-01-07)

Research finds opioids may help chronic pain, a little
In a study published today by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), McMaster University researchers reviewed 96 clinical trials with more than 26,000 participants and found opioids provide only small improvements in pain, physical functioning and sleep quality compared to a placebo. (2018-12-18)

Understanding endometriosis
About 10 percent of women worldwide suffer from endometriosis, a painful and debilitating disease with inadequate treatments. Currently, doctors don't know what causes the condition, which occurs when endometrial tissue escapes the uterus and forms lesions on other organs. But scientists are working hard to better understand the disease and develop new diagnostic tests and medicines, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2018-10-31)

Home-based biofeedback therapy is effective option for tough-to-treat constipation
Biofeedback therapy used at home is about 70 percent effective at helping patients learn how to coordinate and relax bowel muscles and relieve one of the most difficult-to-treat types of constipation, investigators report. (2018-10-22)

Medical management of opioid-induced constipation differs from other forms of condition
Traditional laxatives are recommended as first-line agents to treat patients with a confirmed diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation, according to a new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association. If an adequate trial of laxatives results in suboptimal symptom control, the guidelines recommend peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) drugs, namely naldemedine, naloxegol and methylnatrexone. (2018-10-17)

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