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Current Contraception News and Events, Contraception News Articles.
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How were oral contraceptives, concurrent depressive symptoms associated among adolescents, young women?
This observational study examined associations between depressive symptoms and oral contraceptive use in adolescents and young women and how those associations might differ by age. Oral contraceptive use has been associated with increased risk for subsequent depression in adolescents. The study included about 1,000 girls and young women in the Netherlands who completed at least 1 of 4 assessments about their oral contraceptive use and depressive symptoms at ages 16, 19, 22 and 25. (2019-10-02)

Secret-shopper-style study shows online birth control prescription overall safe, efficient
Secret-shopper-style study of nine Web-based and digital-app vendors of contraception scripts shows their services are overall safe and efficient. Analysis also reveals reliable screening by vendors for contraindicated health conditions and medications in line with CDC prescription guidelines. (2019-09-25)

Kindness is a top priority in a long-term partner according to a new international study
One of the top qualities that we look for in a long-term partner is kindness, according to new research by Swansea University. (2019-09-19)

Study shows cost savings from same-day long-acting reversible contraception
According to a new study by Indiana University School of Medicine doctors, providing adolescents seeking birth control the ability to obtain a long-acting reversible contraceptive on the same day as their clinic visit could lead to significant cost savings for insurance providers. (2019-09-11)

Research shows OB-GYNs hesitate to talk about fertility
A new study in The Journal of Reproductive Medicine shows many OB-GYNs are uncomfortable counseling their patients on fertility at a time when more women are delaying pregnancy and needing their doctors to be more vigilant about this education. The study's lead author, Houston Methodist's Dr. Rashmi Kudesia, says the results indicate patients need to proactively bring up the subject with their doctors regardless of current relationship status or future plans for pregnancy. (2019-09-05)

Pregnant transgender men at risk for depression and lack of care, Rutgers study finds
Transgender men who become pregnant are at increased risk for depression and difficulty getting medical care due to a lack of knowledge among health care providers, a Rutgers study reports. The study, published in the journal Maturitas, examined health care research on transgender men who become pregnant at or after age 35 to determine their medical and mental health needs. (2019-08-15)

Managing ovarian cancer risk in women with BRCA1/2 genetic variants
A new review to help physicians manage the risk of ovarian cancer in women who carry the BRCA1/2 gene mutations is published in CMAJ. (2019-08-12)

Teens feel pressured to get pregnant
Female adolescents are experiencing relationship abuse at alarming rates, according to a new Michigan State University study that specifically researched reproductive coercion -- a form of abuse in which a woman is pressured to become pregnant against her wishes. (2019-08-08)

BU researcher asks, 'is it time for another contraception revolution?'
In an effort to protect the planet and preserve its natural treasures for future generations, another contraception revolution that provides options for populations not currently being served by modern contraception may be the answer according to a Perspective in this week's New England Journal of Medicine. (2019-07-31)

Study finds worrisome birth-control knowledge gaps
A new study has uncovered concerning gaps in knowledge about birth control effectiveness. The research, conducted in the Vietnam capital of Hanoi, included four forms of contraception: IUDs, birth control pills, male condoms and withdrawal. (2019-07-29)

Access to contraception not 'silver bullet' to stem population growth in Africa
The population of sub-Saharan Africa is set to double by 2050, yet a new study challenges a common misconception that this is caused solely by inadequate family planning. (2019-07-18)

The Lancet Global Health: Mexico City Policy linked to 40% increase in abortions in sub-Saharan African countries reliant on US foreign aid
The most comprehensive study to measure the impact of the Mexico City policy between 1995 and 2014 finds that abortion rates rose substantially among women in sub-Saharan African countries with high exposure to the policy relative to countries less exposed. In addition, the use of modern contraception declined and pregnancies increased. This pattern of more frequent abortions and lower contraceptive use was reversed after the policy was rescinded, suggesting a causal effect, according to an observational study published in The Lancet Global Health. (2019-06-27)

Is sexting associated with sexual behaviors, mental health among teens?
This study, called a systematic review and meta-analysis, combined the results of 23 studies with nearly 42,000 participants to summarize associations between sexting by adolescents, sexual behavior and mental health risk factors. The results suggest sexting was associated with sexual activity, multiple sex partners, a lack of contraception use, delinquent behavior, anxiety/depression, alcohol and drug use, and smoking. (2019-06-17)

The Lancet: First randomised trial finds no substantial difference in risk of acquiring HIV for three different forms of contraception
A randomised trial of more than 7,800 African women found that a type of contraceptive injection (intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate -- DMPA-IM) posed no substantially increased risk of HIV acquisition when compared with a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant. The results of this first ever randomised trial in the area, published in The Lancet, counter 30 years of epidemiology research suggesting a potential association between some types of contraceptives and risk of acquiring HIV. (2019-06-13)

Progress in family planning in Africa accelerating
A new study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that women in eight sub-Saharan African countries are gaining access to and using modern contraception at a faster rate than previously projected. (2019-05-20)

Physician procedure volume linked to outcomes after surgical abortion
Although surgically induced abortion is a low-risk procedure, women whose physician infrequently performs it have almost twice the risk of severe complications, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-05-13)

Study: Trump's 'Repeal and Replace' debate already impacting women's health
Trump recently renewed the repeal and replace battle cry promising to make the 2020 election a referendum on Obamacare. While many speculate about the impacts of a repeal, a new study by John W. Ayers, found the debate is already impacting women's health, namely their contraceptive choices. For instance, public interest in IUDs increased 15% during the week of March 25, 2019, when Trump urged congress to repeal and the Supreme Court to nullify Obamacare. (2019-04-09)

Second potential male birth control pill passes human safety tests
A new male birth control pill passed tests of safety and tolerability when healthy men used it daily for a month, and it produced hormone responses consistent with effective contraception, according to researchers at two institutions testing the drug. The phase 1 study results was presented Sunday, March 24, at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (2019-03-25)

Contraceptive jewelry could offer a new family planning approach
Family planning for women might one day be as simple as putting on an earring. (2019-03-25)

The world's adolescents -- large unmet needs and growing inequalities
The first detailed global study of adolescent health reveals: growing inequality with a large disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, obesity rates have doubled, with countries in the Pacific region having among the highest prevalence, anemia remains unchecked, India bearing heavy burden, investments in health, education, legal systems have not kept pace with needs, and gender inequity is a powerful driver of poor adolescent health. (2019-03-12)

New study shows use of medication abortion rebounded in Texas after FDA label change
Proportion of medication abortion plummeted after House Bill 2, bounced back after FDA label change on abortion medication mifepristone. (2019-02-25)

Demand for long-acting contraception rose sharply after 2016 election
A new, robust study conducted by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that rates of long-acting, reversible contraception went up by 21.6 percent in the 30 days after the presidential election compared to rates at the same time of year in 2015. (2019-02-04)

Layered cocktails inspire new form of male birth control
For decades, women have shouldered most of the burden of contraception. However, long-term use of female birth control pills could increase the risk for side effects such as blood clots or breast cancer. Now, inspired by colorful layered cocktails, researchers have developed a medium-term, reversible male contraceptive. They report their results in the journal ACS Nano. (2019-01-30)

Long-acting contraceptive designed to be self-administered via microneedle patch
A new long-acting contraceptive designed to be self-administered by women may provide a new family planning option, particularly in developing nations where access to healthcare can be limited, a recent study suggests. The contraceptive would be delivered using microneedle skin patch technology originally developed for the painless administration of vaccines. (2019-01-14)

Readiness for first sex is about more than age for many young Britons
A substantial proportion of young Britons are not ready for their first sexual activity -- whatever their age -- and lose their virginity 'under circumstances that are incompatible with positive sexual health,' reveals research published online in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-14)

One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives
As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-07)

A summary of electrospun nanofibers as drug delivery system
Recently, electrospun polymeric nanofibers have proven to be an interesting strategy for drug delivery systems application.This review presents an overview of the reported drugs loaded into polymeric nanofibers, to be used as drug delivery systems. (2018-12-14)

Information on reproductive health outcomes lacking in Catholic hospitals
As Catholic health care systems expand nationwide, little is known about the reproductive outcomes of their patients compared to patients in other settings, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2018-12-06)

Study shows low-income women in Texas are not getting contraception after childbirth
The study shows that two-thirds of women did not receive their desired contraception at the six-week postpartum visit, increasing risk of unintended pregnancy. (2018-12-04)

Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse
Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse. (2018-12-03)

When it comes to using birth control, both intention and attitude matter
A new VA study adds to the evidence that women's intentions around becoming pregnant don't fully explain whether and how they use contraception. Rather, their attitudes toward becoming pregnant also play a role. (2018-11-29)

Spay and neuter for dogs: Avoiding the health consequences
In the United States, spaying or neutering a dog has become standard practice to reduce pet overpopulation. Yet recent research has shed light on the long-term health impacts of the lack of natural hormonal balance resulting from removal of the gonads. This research article includes details on alternatives to traditional spay and neuter and encourages an individualized approach to determining the best contraceptive option for each dog. (2018-10-30)

Nephrologists may need more training in women's health issues
Nephrologists often lack confidence in managing women's health issues that may be related to kidney disease. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center. (2018-10-26)

First trial of dapivirine ring with both ARV and contraceptive finds no safety concerns
In the first clinical study of a vaginal ring that releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine as well as a contraceptive hormone, there were no safety concerns and the ring was well-tolerated. The ring is designed to provide protection against both HIV infection and unintended pregnancy for 90 days at a time. Given the encouraging results, researchers have already launched a second Phase I trial of the dual-purpose ring. (2018-10-24)

Religious leaders' support may be key to modern contraception
Women in Nigeria whose clerics extol the benefits of family planning were significantly more likely to adopt modern contraceptive methods, new research suggests, highlighting the importance of engaging religious leaders to help increase the country's stubbornly low uptake of family planning services. (2018-10-16)

'Domestic gag rule' will negatively impact women's health care
Texas study points to adverse impact of proposed federal title x guidelines on abortion counseling and referrals. (2018-10-11)

Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation
Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation. That is one of the recommendations in the 2018 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines for the management of cardiovascular diseases during pregnancy published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website. (2018-08-25)

Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have almost double the rate of repeat pregnancy
Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have nearly double the rate of having another baby within a year of delivering compared to women without such disabilities, according to a new study published in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)

Women's basic rights under threat from Trump gag rule, warn experts
The Trump administration is mounting a ferocious attack on abortion rights with plans for a domestic gag rule on abortion counselling and provision, warn experts in The BMJ today. (2018-06-13)

Many US women don't realize they're seeking reproductive care at Catholic hospitals
More than one-third of women who go to a Catholic hospital for reproductive care aren't aware they're seeking obstetrical and gynecological care at a facility that may have limited health care options due to its religious affiliation. (2018-06-05)

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