Current Contraceptive News and Events

Current Contraceptive News and Events, Contraceptive News Articles.
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Reimbursing hospitals for postpartum contraception could prevent unintended pregnancies
Researchers at Brown found that expanding access to long-acting reversible contraception methods, such as IUDs and implants, could give adolescents more agency in choosing whether and when to become pregnant again. (2021-02-09)

90-day vaginal ring shows promise as method for preventing both HIV and pregnancy
A vaginal ring containing the antiretroviral drug dapivirine and the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel delivered sustained levels of each drug when used continuously for 90 days - levels likely sufficient to serve its dual purpose for protecting against both HIV and unwanted pregnancy, according to results being presented at HIVR4P. The 90-day dual-purpose ring builds on the monthly dapivirine ring, which, if approved, would be the first biomedical HIV prevention method specifically for women. (2021-01-26)

'Tri-active' contraceptive gel combines spermicidal, anti-viral, libido-enhancing agents
Researchers have created a trifunctional contraceptive gel that contains spermicidal, anti-viral and libido-enhancing agents in one formulation. (2021-01-26)

OR Medicaid expansion helped more women access insurance coverage for abortion services
A recent study from Oregon State University found that after Oregon expanded Medicaid in 2014, more women were able to receive insurance coverage for abortion services, rather than paying out of pocket. (2021-01-13)

CDC report: removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception use by people with certain characteristics or medical conditions. The CDC is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the release of its U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (MEC), (2021-01-12)

Gates Foundation helps UC study sexual health of South African youth
An important new finding by University of Cincinnati researchers could help slow the transmission of HIV/AIDS and reduce pregnancies among adolescent girls in rural South Africa. (2020-12-22)

Oral contraceptive pills protect against ovarian and endometrial cancer
A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer. The protective effect remains for several decades after discontinuing the use. The study is published in the journal Cancer Research. (2020-12-17)

UC research finds low rates of contraceptive use in women with kidney failure
New research from the University of Cincinnati finds that women with kidney failure have low rates of contraceptive use. The study, published in the journal Kidney Medicine, finds an overall contraceptive use rate of 5.3% among women with kidney failure undergoing dialysis in the United States. (2020-11-12)

Use of some contraceptives may temporarily delay a woman's fertility from resuming
Women who stop using some forms of contraception may have to wait up to eight months before their fertility returns, suggests research published online in The BMJ. (2020-11-11)

Postpartum care fails to provide women with key recommended services
Most women are receiving fewer than half the services recommended during their comprehensive postpartum medical checkup, according to a study by University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers. (2020-11-10)

Expanded birth control coverage may help reduce disparities in unplanned pregnancies
Removing out-of-pocket costs for contraception may help reduce the income-related disparities that play such a significant role in unintended pregnancies, a new Michigan Medicine-led study suggests. (2020-11-06)

Pregnancy complications linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life
Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data published by The BMJ today. (2020-10-07)

Paying GPs to provide contraception information linked to reduced abortions
Providing general practitioners (GPs) with financial incentives to offer information about long-acting contraceptives, such as the hormonal implant, is associated with an increase in their use, and a fall in the number of abortions . (2020-09-14)

How birth control, girls' education can slow population growth
Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends. But new research from the University of Washington analyzes those factors to determine, what accelerates a decline in otherwise high-fertility countries. (2020-09-08)

Age-appropriate contraception counseling helps health care providers educate teens
Preventing unplanned pregnancies in adolescents with effective and easy-to-use contraception is key to ensuring that adolescents do not become parents before they are ready. Adolescents view their health care providers as trusted sources of medical information. Thus, providers are tasked with providing adolescent patients with comprehensive, age-appropriate and nonjudgmental contraception counseling. (2020-08-27)

Your brain on birth control
Millions of women have been taking oral contraceptives, but little is known about whether the synthetic hormones found in the oral contraceptives have behavioural and neurophysiological effects, especially during puberty and early adolescence, which are critical periods of brain development. A uOttawa team of researchers found that oral contraceptive use is related to significant structural changes in brain regions implicated in memory and emotional processing. It also alters stress reactivity. (2020-07-28)

Cost prevents one in five US women from using their preferred contraception
Recent Supreme Court Ruling Will Increase Birth Control Costs for Many Women, Make it Less Likely They Will Use the Birth Control They Want (2020-07-13)

Use of continuous combined oral contraceptives demonstrates bone health benefits
Women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) become estrogen deficient at an early age, which makes them more vulnerable to the loss of bone mineral density. A new study suggests that use of continuous combined oral contraceptives may be especially effective in reducing bone mass loss. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-06-24)

Genes may play a role in weight gain from birth control
A woman's genetic make-up may cause her to gain weight when using a popular form of birth control, according to a study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-05-12)

Use of emergency contraceptive pills among Scandinavian women
Use of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) is common among Scandinavian women, with one-third having used them at least once, according to a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. (2020-05-06)

Birth and pregnancy experts fail to deliver on contraception advice
Health care professionals who provide contraceptive services outside of general practice are unlikely to discuss long-acting reversible contraception such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) or implants for women without children -- despite their proven safety, effectiveness and convenience. A review published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing analysed the views of non-GP practitioners often tasked with delivering contraceptive advice. It found lack of knowledge, time constraints and inaccurate personal beliefs shaped their reluctance to recommend these superior contraception methods. (2020-05-06)

Study reveals how spaceflight affects risk of blood clots in female astronauts
A study of female astronauts has assessed the risk of blood clots associated with spaceflight. The study, published in Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, in collaboration with King's College London, the Centre for Space Medicine Baylor College of Medicine, NASA Johnson Space Centre and the International Space University, examines the potential risk factors for developing a blood clot (venous thromboembolism) in space. (2020-05-05)

Doubts cast over accuracy of many popular fertility and pregnancy planning apps
Many popular fertility and pregnancy planning apps may be inaccurate, suggest the results of a scoping review of the available evidence, published online in the journal BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2020-04-06)

Columbia study evaluates cervical cancer risks of IUDs
Patients who used copper intrauterine devices were found to have a lower risk of cervical cancer compared to users of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. (2020-03-10)

Providing contraceptive care in the pediatric emergency department
A new study found that two-thirds of female adolescents ages 16-21 seen in a pediatric Emergency Department (ED) were interested in discussing contraception, despite having a high rate of recent visits to a primary care provider. More than 22% indicated that they would be likely to start or change contraception during the ED visit. (2020-03-09)

Menopause timing hard to determine in every third woman
Is it possible to investigate menopausal age, or not? In more than one in three women aged 50, the body provides no clear answer about the menopause, Swedish study shows. Increased use of hormonal intrauterine devices and contraceptive pills are the cause. (2020-02-07)

Stopping sperm in its tracks: latest progress in the hunt for a male contraceptive
Researchers at the University of Dundee have developed an unrivalled, fully automated robotic screening system which allows them to rapidly test the effect of drugs and other chemicals on human sperm. The research team at Dundee, led by Professor Chris Barratt and Dr Paul Andrews, are working towards finding a safe and effective male contraceptive. (2020-01-28)

Long-acting contraception has proven highly effective but is restricted by some hospitals
Long-acting reversible contraceptives like intrauterine implants have greatly reduced unintended pregnancies and abortions, but government protections allowing religious hospitals to restrict care are limiting access to health care consumers, according to an expert at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2019-12-17)

Women with a low desire to avoid pregnancy still use contraception
A new study challenges assumptions that women with the highest preference against pregnancy use more effective contraceptive methods and that women who might welcome pregnancy do not use contraception. Overall, women with a stronger preference to avoid pregnancy were far more likely to use any contraceptive method. Still, over half of the women studied who reported low preference to avoid pregnancy nevertheless used a contraceptive method. (2019-12-16)

Study finds key brain region smaller in birth control pill users
Researchers studying the brain found that women taking oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills, had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill, according to a new study. (2019-12-04)

Once-a-month oral contraceptive could improve patient adherence
Researchers have created a new ingestible drug delivery platform that expands in the stomach and could safely deliver a contraceptive over one month when tested in pigs. (2019-12-04)

Contraceptive drug shows promise for preventing and regressing cervical cancer
A new study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, reports that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the active ingredient in the common contraceptive injection Depo-Provera, was effective in preventing the development of cervical cancer in mice with precancerous lesions. The drug also decreased existing precancerous lesions. If proven effective clinically, MPA may be a boon to women who do not have access to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. (2019-11-12)

One-third of reproductive age women have health conditions that may complicate pregnancy
One in three women of reproductive age have at least one chronic condition that could compromise their health or lead to adverse outcomes during pregnancy, according to University of Utah Health scientists. Yet few of these women are using the most effective forms of contraception to prevent unplanned pregnancies. The researchers say this could be a sign that women with preexisting health problems aren't receiving adequate counseling about birth control. (2019-11-07)

Birth control options out of reach for many low-income women
Young, low-income women in Canada are less likely to use more effective methods of birth control like the pill, and more likely to use no contraception or condoms only, according to new UBC research. (2019-11-05)

Teens taking oral contraceptives may be at increased risk for depressive symptoms
In a study published in JAMA Psychiatry, investigators report that there was no association between oral contraceptive use and depressive symptom severity in the entire population they studied (ages 16 through 25). However, they found that 16-year-old girls reported higher depressive symptom severity compared with 16-year-old girls not using oral contraceptives. (2019-10-02)

How were oral contraceptives, concurrent depressive symptoms associated among adolescents, young women?
This observational study examined associations between depressive symptoms and oral contraceptive use in adolescents and young women and how those associations might differ by age. Oral contraceptive use has been associated with increased risk for subsequent depression in adolescents. The study included about 1,000 girls and young women in the Netherlands who completed at least 1 of 4 assessments about their oral contraceptive use and depressive symptoms at ages 16, 19, 22 and 25. (2019-10-02)

Secret-shopper-style study shows online birth control prescription overall safe, efficient
Secret-shopper-style study of nine Web-based and digital-app vendors of contraception scripts shows their services are overall safe and efficient. Analysis also reveals reliable screening by vendors for contraindicated health conditions and medications in line with CDC prescription guidelines. (2019-09-25)

Later puberty and later menopause associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women, while use of contraceptive pill and longer time between periods associated with higher risk
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 Sept) shows that use of the contraceptive pill and longer menstrual cycles are associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), while later puberty and later menopause are associated with lower risk. (2019-09-16)

Study shows cost savings from same-day long-acting reversible contraception
According to a new study by Indiana University School of Medicine doctors, providing adolescents seeking birth control the ability to obtain a long-acting reversible contraceptive on the same day as their clinic visit could lead to significant cost savings for insurance providers. (2019-09-11)

Teen birth control use linked to depression risk in adulthood
Women who used oral contraceptives during adolescence are more likely to develop depression as adults, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-08-28)

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